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Huntington's Disease

Huntington’s disease is a hereditary disorder that destroys certain areas of the brain involved in intellect, emotion, and movement development. It is characterized by the loss of mental abilities; developing of emotional problems; and uncontrollable movement of the limbs and face.

237 Questions

Does Stephen Hawking have Huntington's disease?

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Asked by Wiki User

No, Stephen Hawking did not have Huntington's disease. He had amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.

Is huntington disease a autosomal dominant disorder?

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Yes, Huntington's disease is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by a mutation in the HTT gene on chromosome 4. An affected individual has a 50% chance of passing on the mutated gene to each of their children.

Is huntington disease multifactorial inheritance?

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No, Huntington's disease is a genetic disorder caused by a single gene mutation on chromosome 4. It follows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance, meaning that a person only needs to inherit one copy of the mutated gene from a parent to develop the condition. It is not considered a multifactorial inheritance disorder.

A woman heterozygous for Huntington disease reproduces with a man without the condition. What are the chances the child will have the condition?

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There is a 50% chance the child will inherit the Huntington disease allele from the mother and develop the condition. The inheritance of Huntington disease follows an autosomal dominant pattern, meaning the child has a 50% chance of inheriting the allele.

When was the huntington disease found?

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Huntington's disease was first described by American physician George Huntington in 1872. He published a paper detailing the symptoms and progression of the disease in several generations of a family living in Long Island, New York.

Where is Huntington disease found in the body?

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Huntington's disease primarily affects the brain. It is a neurodegenerative disorder that causes the progressive breakdown of nerve cells in the brain. Symptoms typically include movement disorders, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disturbances.

Total how many diseases are in the world?

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There are thousands of diseases in the world, estimated at around 30,000 different types. This includes infectious diseases, chronic conditions, genetic disorders, and others that affect human health.

What does a lack of chromosomes do?

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A lack of chromosomes can lead to serious genetic disorders or birth defects. For example, Turner syndrome is caused by the absence of one X chromosome in females, leading to various developmental and physical abnormalities. In some cases, chromosomal disorders can result in miscarriage or stillbirth.

Did Rosa have a disease?

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Rosa Parks did not have a specific disease. She was known for her pivotal role in the civil rights movement in the United States, particularly for her refusal to give up her seat to a white passenger on a public bus in Montgomery, Alabama in 1955.

Is there a particular group more likely to get Huntington disease?

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Huntington disease is an inherited condition, so those with a family history of the disease are more likely to develop it. It affects people of all ethnicities and genders equally. Symptoms usually appear in adulthood, but can manifest at any age.

Is huntington disease homozygous or heterozygous?

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Huntington disease is autosomal dominant, meaning that individuals who inherit one copy of the mutant allele from either parent will develop the disease. Thus, individuals with Huntington's disease are heterozygous for the mutant allele. Homozygous individuals would not survive past a certain age due to the severity of the disorder.

Disease protist and what it does?

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One example of a disease-causing protist is Plasmodium, which causes malaria. Plasmodium is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected Anopheles mosquitoes and infects red blood cells, leading to symptoms such as fever, chills, and anemia. If left untreated, malaria can be life-threatening.

What is Caeliac disease?

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Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder in which the ingestion of gluten leads to damage in the small intestine. This can result in a range of symptoms such as gastrointestinal issues, fatigue, and nutrient deficiencies. The treatment involves following a strict gluten-free diet for life.

Why does huntington disease persist as a degenerative genetic disorder?

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Huntington's disease persists as a degenerative genetic disorder because it is caused by a mutation in the huntingtin gene, leading to the production of a toxic form of the huntingtin protein that damages nerve cells in the brain. This mutation is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, meaning that a child only needs to inherit one copy of the mutated gene from a parent to develop the disease. As a result, the mutation can be passed down through generations, leading to the persistence of the disorder in families.

What disease can cause by anger?

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Chronic anger or anger-related lifestyle factors can contribute to a range of health issues such as high blood pressure, heart disease, weakened immune system, and increased risk of stroke. It can also negatively impact mental health, leading to anxiety, depression, and unhealthy coping mechanisms like substance abuse.

Causes of endocrine disease?

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Endocrine diseases can be caused by various factors, including genetics, autoimmune conditions, tumors affecting the endocrine glands, infections, and lifestyle factors such as diet and exercise. Hormonal imbalances, disruptions in feedback loops, and malfunctions in specific endocrine glands can also lead to endocrine diseases.

What are the symptoms of Huntington disease?

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Symptoms of Huntington's disease include involuntary movements, cognitive impairment, psychiatric symptoms such as depression and irritability, and difficulties with speech and swallowing. These symptoms typically worsen over time as the disease progresses.

What is the frequency of the mutation genetic disease of the huntington disease?

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Hungtington disease is a trinucleotide repeat genetic disorder, in which you have extra repeats of CAG in your gene coding for the hungtin protein. If you have more than 35 repeats you get the phenotype (symptoms), and it shows anticipation, which means that as the disease is passed on from generation to generation the repeats increase, hence the severity of the disease. It is quite rare, but the exact incidence is hard to estimate, because people carrying 30 repeats are asymptomatic. Hope this helps

What is the percentage of people that get huntingtons disease?

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Around 1 in 10,000 people are estimated to develop Huntington's disease, a rare genetic disorder. It is caused by a mutation in the HTT gene on chromosome 4.

Is huntingtons painful?

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It can be, especially for the family.

Can you die from huntingtons disease?

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Yes. Most individuals afflicted with Huntington's Disease die prematurely, due to the progression of the disease.

A person can be tested for the allele that causes huntingtons disease because of that allele is different from that of a normal allele?

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Because Huntington's is a genetic disorder and it is known what sequence in what region causes the disorder.

Is Huntingtons disease non disjunction?

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No. Hemophilia is the result of any of a number of mutations such as reversals, translations, deletions, etc. These mutations need to have occurred in a very specific segment of the coding found on the X chromosome. The replication of that X chromosome however is unaffected with the exception that the mutation on it is replicated as well.

How do you know if you have got huntingtons disease?

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First, since this is a genetic disease, that is transmitted only by inheritance, a determination of family history of HD is usually made. There are also characteristic symptoms that become noticeable in later life, most commonly chorea- or uncontrolled movements of the body. In recent years, a genetic test has been developed that permits screening the the chromosome that causes HD- if you do not have that chromosome, you do not have, and will not develop HD. If you DO have that chromosome, at some point the symptoms of HD will develop. The exact age varies from one person to another. There is additional information at the website of the Huntington's Disease Society of America.

Is Huntington disease more common in some parts of the world than others?

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Yep- people who had a parent with HD. Since it is a genetic disease, that is the only way to get it- inherit it from a parent. Since it is inherited, there will be areas that have more cases- notably England, Australia, and Venezuela.