Japanese Internment Camps

After the US was bombed at Pearl Harbor, Japanese internment camps (also called War Relocation Camps by the US government) were set up in parts of Canada and the US. Thousands of Japanese Americans and Japanese Canadians were relocated to these internment camps, which were disbanded in 1945.

1,824 Questions
Japanese Internment Camps

What did Japanese eat in internment camps?

Very insufficient food such as potatoes, rice, and hot dogs.

Also on Japanese holidays, such as New Years, they ate Japanese food, but on American holidays and other days, such as Thanksgiving or Tuesday, they ate American food

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Japanese Internment Camps

Were Japanese POWs captured by Americans transported to camps in the US?

Yes

and they were raped by the bed intruder

you can run and tell that, homeboy

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Japanese Internment Camps

What were the main causes for the Japanese internment camps?

Fear! Many believed there were spys in the masses of Japanese-Americans who lived along the California coasts. Others believed they would sabotage Hoover Dam or defense plants. Still others though they might cause an uprising and try to take over governments. All were false, many Japanese-Americans served in the military fighting in Europe, others were translators for units in the Pacific. Translation was not only being able to read and speak the language, but understanding the culture.

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History of Asia
Japanese Internment Camps

When was the last internment camp closed?

1947. Crystal City, Texas, was the location of the largest internment camp administered by the INS and Department of Justice. November 1, 1947, more than two years after the end of World War II, the Crystal City internment camp closed; the last facility detaining alien enemies to do so. - The Handbook of Texas Online

http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/WW/quwby.html

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Japanese Internment Camps

How many people lived in the Japanese internment camps during World War 2?

all the Japanese Americans in America lived in the camps.

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Japanese Internment Camps

Where were the relocation camps for the Japanese in the US during World War 2?

US Internment Camps during WW IIThe related link site will have a map of all the Japanese-American Internment camps in the United States during World War II.
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Pearl Harbor
Japan in WW2
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Japanese Internment Camps

Why did the US place Japanese-Americans in internment camp?

They were pissed at the Japanese for bombing pearl harbor so the president was mad. He made execution order 9066.

Racist...

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History, Politics & Society
Japanese Internment Camps

Why were the internment camps opened?

They were opened persuant to Executive Order 9066 signed by Franklin

Roosevelt on 19 February 1942. Many Americans were concerned about

further further activities by what they wrongly felt were enemies. It was

a form of national hysteria.

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WW2 Homefront
Japan in WW2
US in WW2
Japanese Internment Camps

Why did Roosevelt order the internment of Japanese-Americans?

Franklin Delano Roosevelt intention with the Japanese internment was to round up and control all persons of Japanease ancestry in the USA, after Japan attacked the USN fleet at Hawaii, on December 7th, 1941. This was because of a fear that these person might do acts of sabotage, such as setting fires, or attacking civillians. They were collected and shipped to isolated camps in the mountains, or the desert, men women and kids, all together. Some camps had up to 10,000 people in them In actual fact, the Japanese-Americans proved to be very loyal and when they were given the chance to become American soldiers they fought well, but not in the Pacific theatre. They all served in Europe, far from Japan.

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Australia in WW2
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Japanese Internment Camps

What were conditions like for the POWs of the Japanese army?

The conditions were appaling for anyone who was a POW in the hands of the Japanese.Japan did not sign the Geneva Aggrement,which meant if you were a pow of Germany or Italy during the war, you were expected not to be beaten during your stay , to be given medical treatment if sick or injured,red cross packages to be given to all prisoners.Also the Japanese had a belief that if a soldiers unit was captured or retreated, suicide was the best way out.Allied soliders-sailors-marines who were defeated at Singapore/Bataan-Corrigedor/Wake Island in 1941-early 1942 were treated horribly.The combined Filippino/Americans who surrendered at Bataan were marched many miles with no water to drink-putrid food to eat-not too many breaks.Those that dropped out of the formation were beaten with rifle-butts to the head, bayoneted multiple times or even run over by Japanese vehicles.The prison camps under Japanese control were horrible.One camp put Allied POWS to work on building a railway bridge on the river Kwai,even though the prisoners were starving, had no medical supplies to treat those that had malaria-berry/berry-dysentry and beat the pows for no reason what so ever.

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US in WW2
Japanese Internment Camps

What was the reasoning of the US government for placing thousands of Japanese Americans into internment camps?

Many Americans were concerned about the loyalty of Japanese Americans

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Japanese Internment Camps

When were Japanese internment camps in use?

They were in use in the early 1900's.

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Languages and Cultures
English to Japanese
Plural Nouns
Japanese Internment Camps

What is ata in Japanese?

foe, enemy, revenge, enmity, grudge, feud, harm

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Australia in WW2
Japanese Internment Camps

What happened to Australian POWs in Japanese camps?

Australians had the highest survival rate of all the allies held by the sadistict japanese. Even though they had the highest survival rate, only six people survived in the Sandakan Death March.

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Holocaust
Nazi Concentration Camps
Japanese Internment Camps

What is the similarity between Japanese Internment camps and the Nazi Concentration camps?

Japanese internment camps and concentration camps imprisoned citizens during WWII based on racial prejudice and distrust. Although violating their rights as citizens, the US treated the Japanese relatively humanely, whereas the Nazis treated the Jews and other prisoners as animals. The US did not rent out prisoners as labor, perform biological experiments, or deliberately exterminate prisoners. (Guards did kill and injure several Japanese who violated camp boundaries.) Both systems of camps were involuntary yet (at the time) legal restraints on citizens (though not always for foreign nationals). Both designated certain races the government believed to be "undesirable", "inferior" or "disloyal".

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How was the internment of Japanese citizens right?

There was nothing 'right' about it. The internment was a violation of USA law in that census data was used criminally to identify the Japanese Americans. The internment itself was morally wrong in that it violated American priciples of due process and protection of the laws of the land. This said, war in its nature is full of extremes. All nations involved in war toss out certain rules that would never be considered in peace time. After the war is over, there are always groups seeking compensation and apologies. Once you realize that all wars are a fight between nations for primacy. All nations use whatever means are available to win the fight for national survival. It is not fair after the fact to judge those actions taken during the stress and strain of battle. Instead of looking for bad guys, good guys and bogeymen, the mature way to review history is to realize that all nations strive for power and do whatever they perceive it takes to achieve that goal, even if it means damaging their own citizens.

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Japanese Internment Camps

What did Americans think of Japanese internment?

It was accepted without much thought at the time,

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How many Japanese-Americans died or survived or escaped the internment camps?

The internment camps were started after the attack on Pearl Harbor and America and Canada (blood running high from the horrors of it all) were later accused of racism against the Japanese that had become American or Canadian citizens and most were born in these countries.

It was not only the Americans, but Canada who made a grave error in putting Japanese citizens of the U.S. and Canada into Internment camps. To this day it's a blight on the history of both countries and the numbers of dead will never be known for sure. For the most part the Japanese lived in squalor, tight quarters, some died from disease, heat, cold, others were shot for disputes against the reasons they were interred and others were shot for trying to escape. It wasn't like concentration camps, but that's up for grabs as well.

Over a 9 month period 22,000 Japanese-Canadians were taken from their homes and scattered throughout B.C. By Oct./42 the Cdn. Gov't had set up 8 internment camps in Interior, B.C. Kaslo, New Denver, Tashme, Roseberry, Slocan City, Lemon Creek, Sandon and Greenwood. Tashme was named after the 3 leading BC's security commissions: T Alor, SHirras and MEad.

The Japanese were treated like slaves and because of a shortage of farmers during WW2 they were forced out to work in road camps to go to beet camps and be with their families. Like Americans, Canadians punished the Japanese for a crime they didn't commit. They saw the Japanese people as "not white" or "Japanese spies." The Japanese were stripped of their rights, issued special clothing, humiliated, thrown behind barb wire fences and were forced to do manual labor.

Many Japanese families were forced to live in cramped quarters with 10 other families sharing one stove. Some camps such as Slocan city; did have the resources to house that many people coming into the camps. Japanese were placed in tents until houses were erected, but the houses were rickety and extremely cold during the harsh winters.Canada sold all the Japanese' world possessions. In 1943 the Cdn., "Custodian of Aliens" liquidated these worlding possesions without the owner's permission. The "Custodian of Aliens" auctioned off their contents, homes and property.

In 1988 the first Japanese Internment Camp, Canadian Japanese were compensated for all that they had endured during the war. Prime Minister Brian Mulroney signed a compensation package giving $21,000 for each internee's survivor. In total 12 million dollars were paid out.

American Japanese Internment Camps were not any better. These camps were in: Central Utah (Topaz), Colorado River (Poston, AZ), Gila River (Rivers, AZ), Granada (Amache, CO), Heart Mountain WY, Jerome (Denson, AK), Manzanar, CA, Minidoka, CA, Rohwer, AK, Tule Lake (Newell, CA). JUST DEPT. CAMPS: Santa fe, NM, Bismarck, ND, Crystal City, TX, Missoula, MT. CITIZEN ISOLATION CAMPS: Moab, UT, Leupp, AZ, Puyallup, WA, Marysville, CA, Tanforan, CA, Turlock, CA, Salina, CA, Tulare, CA, Pomona, CA, Manzanar, CA, Portland, OR, Sacramento, CA, STockton, CA, Merced, CA, Fresno, CA, Santa Anita, CA, Mayer, CA, Pinedale, CA.

TAG & NUMBERS:This order gave the military free reign to designate military areas and to remove any persons considered a danger. Though theoretically Executive Order 9066 could be used to remove German and Italian Americans only the Japanese community was forced to undergo mass evacuation and imprisonment.

By June 1942 more than 110,000 Japanese (more than 70% of them American citizens) had been forced from their homes into temporary assembly centers. These assembly centers such as Camp Harmony were ramshackle affairs built at racetracks and fairgrounds. From the assembly centers the Japanese were moved to 10 concentration camps scattered in the more inhospitable desert regions of the West.

In 1988 the U.S. Gov't passed legistlation and awarded $20,000 to each of the surviving internees (60,000 in all.)

The kicker to all this is: The American Gov't was short on fighting men so they TOLD the Japanese men in the Internment Camps that if they would fight in the war they could leave the camps with their families. The same applied to the Canadian Gov't. Of course these young Japanese men had no other alternative and although raging within they became some of the most highly decorated soldiers in the war.

Let's hope this mistake is never made again!

Marcy

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Japanese Internment Camps

Why was it unfair for the Japanese-Americans to go to internment camps?

The Americans thought the Japanese-Americans were in contact with the Japanese that planned the pearl harbor attack so they had them sent to interment camps but in actuallity the Japanese-Americans weren't in contact with Japan at all (maybe family) but not the military so they were sent without being able to testify or prove their innocense before being sent unfairly.

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Holocaust
Nazi Concentration Camps
Japanese Internment Camps

What is the difference between Japanese internment camps and nazi concentration camps?

Japanese Internment Camps were in the United States. They housed the Japanese Americans in these camps to search for spies and keep them from turning into spies. These camps were deemed unconstitutional by the US Supreme Court. So they were held illegally. The camp conditions were miserable. They had inadequate housing, bathrooms, food, and many did get sick from the camps. There were not killed or beaten or shot as the people were in the German Concentration camps. Some of the Japanese sons joined the war to prove their allegiance to the United States. The Japanese lost their homes, businesses and possessions. Some Japanese farmers had nice neighbors who kept their farms grow and producing and kept their houses safe but this was the exception not the rule. Many Americans back then were prejudiced against the Japanese, Chinese and other Asians. Truly sad.

The German Concentration camps were filled with Jewish people slated to be killed or used for free hard labor. They were also filled with the "undesirables" the Nazis wanted out of the population. They were communists, political prisoners, religious people, dwarfs, Downs Syndrome people, feeble minded, people with congenital defects, the mentally ill and anyone else they felt like putting into the camps. There were POW camps too. In the camps the conditions were not merely miserable they were deplorable. They were filthy, disease ridden, and the buildings had no heat or beds. The prisoners were put into pajamas. They did not all have coats or shoes. The camps were designed to kill and cremate the people. Some camps had gas chambers to kill thousands of Jews daily. The people died from disease, exposure, dehydration, starvation, dysentery and murder by the Nazis. One of the most horrible things that happened to the prisoners was the medical experiments conducted on them. I couldn't write what happened to them. This entire project of eliminating people Hitler did not approve of was called The Final Solution. His goal was to have the population be only of pure Aryan descent. Incidentally, there is no medical word/fact or sociological human grouping of "Aryans". It was a word Hilter borrowed from some books he read.

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History of the United States
US Constitution
Japanese Internment Camps

When was the 21-gun salute formally adopted by the US?

In 1842, the Presidential salute was formally established at 21 guns. In 1890, regulations designated the "national salute" as 21 guns and redesignated the traditional Independence Day salute, the "Salute to the Union," equal to the number of states. Fifty guns are also fired on all military installations equipped to do so at the close of the day of the funeral of a President, ex-President, or President-elect. The United States Independence Day (commonly known as the Fourth of July) is a federal holiday commemorating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, declaring independence from Great Britain. Hence 1776 1 +7+7+6=21

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World War 2
Japan in WW2
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Japanese Internment Camps

Why were American POW's in Germany not paid for their detainment but the Japanese were?

It is US Policy to pay POWS 'back pay' for their time in POW camps. If it didn't happen, you can generally blame the bureacratic nature of government. While its easy to have a policy sometimes its harder to adminster that policy. For instance, if a soldier is listed MIA, and dies in cativity, the natural process of the government might assume death, and pay the death benefit at the time the soldier was listed as MIA without ever really knowing the soldier WAS a POW. Then of course you have soldiers believed dead, who turn up living, now of course they want their back pay, but the government has already paid out a 'death benefit.'

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Japanese Internment Camps

What were the internment camps of World War 2?

Internment is imprisonment without trial.

1. They were the places where Japanese people in the US and other enemy aliens were taken during World War 2.

2. In all countries fighting in World War 2 there were scares about enemy aliens - that is foreigners with the nationality of the enemy countries - and many of them were interned (locked up without any charge). In all the Allied countries there were screening procedures in place. Also, the criteria changed at various points during the war.

3. In some Allied countries there was also provision for interning people thought likely to act as subversives. So, in Britain for example, some members of the British Union of Fascists (BUF) and a few other organizations were interned, despite the fact that there they British citizens. (There's even a story about a young man who went underground because he was pro-Nazi: he didn't want to serve in the British armed forces and of course didn't want to be interned, either. So he changed his name and and didn't report for the draft, but instead led an illegal, shadowy existence till about 1970).
It's where people got raped. :(

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Japanese Internment Camps

How did American newspapers describe housing in the Japanese internment camps?

The papers did not really talk about them. If they did though they would say they were amazing and people were in great living conditions. This was propiganda of coares

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Pearl Harbor
War and Military History
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Japanese Internment Camps

How did Japanese Americans show that they were loyal Americans?

Among other ways they joined units like the 442nd Regimental Combat Team.

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