Montgomery Bus Boycott

The Montgomery Bus Boycott was an important episode in the U.S. civil rights movement. The campaign began when Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white passenger on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama. The boycott resulted in the Supreme Court ruling that Montgomery laws requiring segregated buses was unconstitutional.

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What was the Montgomery Bus Boycott?

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The Montgomery Bus Boycott, which took place from Dec. 5, 1955, to Dec. 20, 1956, was a civil rights protest during which many African Americans refused to ride city buses in Montgomery, Alabama, to challenge the segregated seating laws. The boycott came four days after Rosa Parks was famously arrested for refusing to give up her seat to a white man on the bus. The boycott, led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., proved to be very effective, and on June 5, 1956, a U.S. District Court ruled in Browder v. Gayle that Alabama’s racial segregation laws for buses were unconstitutional. The U.S. Supreme Court upheld this decision on appeal.
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How did the Montgomery Bus Boycott propel Martin Luther King Jr to fame?

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It was mainly Rosa Parks that got famous from that!
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When was the Montgomery bus boycott?

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The Montgomery bus boycott began on December 5, 1955, four days after Rosa Parks' arrest for refusing to give her bus seat to a white man. Although the boycott was originally planned to last only one day, the organizers of the boycott, led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., decided to extend it until the practice of public transportation segregation was outlawed. The boycott ended 381 days later, on December 20, 1956, the day the city of Montgomery received a court order demanding immediate integration of the buses. The order was issued because the US Supreme Court upheld a US District Court decision (Browder v. Gayle, (1956)) that declared segregation on the city buses was unconstitutional.
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What was the cause and effects of the Montgomery bus boycott?

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The Montgomery bus boycott began in response to Rosa Parks' December 1, 1955 arrest for refusing to give her seat to a white man. The original organizers were Jo Ann Robinson, an English instructor at Alabama State College and President of Montgomery's Women's Political Council, and E. D. Nixon, President of the Montgomery chapter of the NAACP. On December 4, they called a meeting of community leaders to discuss holding a one-day boycott of Montgomery City Lines, Inc., bus company. During the meeting, the group formed a new alliance, the Montgomery Improvement Association (MIA), to which Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was elected Chairman and President. Dr. King subsequently became the leader of the civil rights action that lasted 381 days, resulting in a US Supreme Court ruling (Browder v. Gayle, (1956)) denouncing segregation as unconstitutional.
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What helped protestors win the montgomery bus boycott?

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The majority of bus riders were African Americans committed to the boycott. and they didnt have a sense of smell thoughtout the region of error. in 1956 there was a nobody who becAMCE SOMBODY THE END LOL
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When did the US Supreme Court end the Montgomery bus boycott by declaring segregation on public buses unconstitutional?

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The case Browder v. Gayle, (1956) challenged the state of Alabama and city of Montgomery's segregation policy on intrastate bus travel that resulted in the 1955-56 Montgomery bus boycott. Although Rosa Parks was not a party to the case, her December 1, 1955, arrest for refusing to allow a white man to take her seat was the catalyst for both the boycott and the Browder case. The US Supreme Court affirmed the decision of the US District Court for the Middle District of Alabama in the case of Browder v. Gayle, on November 13, 1956, and declared segregation on buses unconstitutional. On December 20, 1956, the city of Montgomery received a court order mandating integration. Case Citation: Browder v. Gayle, 352 US 903 (1956)
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What caused the Montgomery bus boycott?

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More Information Rosa Parks was arrested on December 1, 1955, for refusing to give up her bus seat to a white man. Ms. Parks was well-respected within the African-American community, arousing outrage at the way she was treated by the bus company and police. African-American community leaders, led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., met to discuss the situation on December 4, and planned a one-day boycott of the Montgomery public transit system for December 5, 1955. What started as a one-day event eventually stretched 381 days, until December 20, 1956, as the community determined not to ride the buses again until they were integrated. Rosa Parks unsuccessfully challenged the constitutionality of the segregation law in the Alabama state courts, where the appeals process threatened to drag on for years. Local attorneys Fred Gray and Charles Lang ford consulted with NAACP Legal Defense Fund attorneys, Robert Carter and Thur good Marshall, whose successful campaign against segregation in education lead to the Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education, (1954). Carter and Marshall suggested choosing a new group of plaintiffs who had been discriminated against and abused by the busing company. The resulting suit, Browder v. Gayle, (1956), resulted in the Supreme Court affirming the US District Court for the Middle District of Alabama's ruling that the bus segregation was unconstitutional.
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How long was the Montgomery bus boycott planned to last?

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The boycott was originally intended to be a one-day protest, beginning and ending on December 5, 1955, but there was so much participation Martin Luther King and the other leaders decided to continue until the buses were integrated. The boycott ended December 20, 1956, after the Supreme Court declared segregation in public transportation unconstitutional and the District Court issued an order mandating desegregation of the city buses.
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How long did the Montgomery bus boycott last?

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The Bus Boycott was inspired by Rosa Parks, when on 1 December 1955, in Montgomery, Alabama, she was arrested for refusing to give her seat to a white man because she was tired, and her feet hurt. It began on Monday 5 December 1955, and ended on December 20, 1956, 381 days, or nearly 13 months, later. It was started by the Montgomery Improvement Association (M.I.A) which Martin Luther King Jr. was president of at the time. It was Martin Luther King's first Black Rights job.
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Who organized the Montgomery bus boycott?

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The Montgomery bus boycott began in response to Rosa Parks' December 1, 1955, arrest for refusing to give her seat to a white man. The original organizers were Jo Ann Robinson, an English instructor at Alabama State College and President of Montgomery's Women's Political Council, and E. D. Nixon, President of the Montgomery chapter of the NAACP. On December 4, they called a meeting of community leaders to discuss holding a one-day boycott of the Montgomery City Lines, Inc., bus company. During the meeting, the group formed a new alliance, the Montgomery Improvement Association (MIA), to which Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was elected Chairman and President. Dr. King subsequently became the leader of the civil rights action that lasted 381 days, resulting in a US Supreme Court ruling (Browder v. Gayle, (1956)) denouncing segregation as unconstitutional.
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What day did the Montgomery bus boycott begin?

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The Montgomery (Alabama) bus boycott began Monday, December 5, 1955 and ended December 20, 1956, 381 days later.
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Was the Montgomery bus boycott a turning point for the civil rights movement?

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Absolutely it was. Not only was it the first time black people showed solidarity in their cause for civil rights, it was cripplingly expensive to the bus companies as most of their riders were black women taking the bus to mostly housekeeping-type jobs out in the "white" suburbs. White women, faced with having no domestic help that they were used to, were often reduced to going to collect their help, because the only alternative to the bus for many of the black women would be to walk. They had no cars. Whether the bus companies themselves applied political pressure I don't know, but faced with almost certain bankruptcy I would suspect they were lobbying long and hard.
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How did the montgomery bus boycott help the civil rights movement?

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It helped all the black people get freedom! **Not only did the CRM help black people, it helped other disenfranchised groups obtain various rights, most notably women (of all races). Other subsequent...
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What is a short summary of the Montgomery Bus Boycott?

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The Montgomery Bus Boycott was a protest by the African-Americans about the buses in the Montgomery area. The buses had a policy that white people sat at the front and African-Americans sat at the back. The African-Americans were angry because they couldn't walk through the White's 'zone' and that they had to pay at the front of the bus, get out of the bus and then get back in through a rear door. Sometimes the bus driver would drive away before they could get back in. The start of it began when outrage occurred when Rosa Parks, an African-American woman, was arrested for not giving up her seat for a white man. (She was next to the window, so there was space). African-American Leaders got together and said to the African-American population to boycott (not use) the buses for a day, but it was more of a success than they thought it would be. The boycott lasted for 381 days (a bit more than a year), until the US Supreme Court said segregation on buses is unconstitutional and ordered a change.
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What was used to discourage the protesters involved in the Montgomery bus boycott?

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Violence against the boycott leader Arrest of the boycott leader Appeal of a federal court decision supporting the boycott
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What year did Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. lead the Montgomery bus boycott?

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Dr. King lead the Montgomery bus boycott from December 5, 1955 until December 20, 1956, when the city of Montgomery received a court order forcing them to integrate the bus system.
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When did the Montgomery Bus Boycott end?

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The Montgomery bus boycott ended on December 20, 1956, the day the city of Montgomery received a court order mandating integration of the buses. The boycott began on December 5, 1955 in reaction to Rosa Parks' arrest for refusing to give her bus seat to a white man. In all it lasted 381 days.
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Did Martin Luther King Jr lead the Montgomery bus boycott during the Civil Rights Movement?

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Yes. The boycott was inspired by Rosa Parks' arrest for refusing to give up her bus seat to for a white man on December 1, 1955. The original organizers were Jo Ann Robinson, an English instructor at Alabama State College and President of Montgomery's Women's Political Council, and E. D. Nixon, President of the Montgomery chapter of the NAACP. On December 4, they called a meeting of community leaders to discuss holding a one-day boycott of the Montgomery City Lines, Inc., bus company. During the meeting, the group formed a new alliance, the Montgomery Improvement Association (MIA), to which Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was elected Chairman and President. Dr. King subsequently became the leader of the civil rights action that lasted 381 days, resulting in a US Supreme Court ruling (Browder v. Gayle, (1956)) denouncing segregation as unconstitutional.
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How did the Montgomery bus boycott begin?

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The Montgomery bus boycott began on December 5, 1955, four days after Rosa Parks' arrest for refusing to give her bus seat to a white man. Although the boycott was originally planned to last only one day, the organizers of the boycott, led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., decided to extend it until the practice of public transportation segregation was outlawed. The boycott ended 381 days later, on December 20, 1956, the day the city of Montgomery received a court order demanding immediate integration of the buses.
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Where did the Montgomery bus boycott take place?

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The Montgomery bus boycott took place in Montgomery, Alabama, in 1955-56, in reaction to Rosa Parks' arrest for refusing to give her bus seat to a white man. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was one of the organizers of the boycott that lasted 381 days.
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What is a poem about Rosa Parks and the Montgomery bus boycott?

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Rosa was a little tired after work in December She hopped on the bus, a ride to remember Paid in the front, and boarded in the back Rosa got herself a seat, but the bus was packed. A man thought he had more right than her to the seat that she sat in She was a little tired from workin' and very tired of being judged, by the color of her skin Rosa wouldn't get up, so they threw her in the slammer This happened a lot down in Montgomery, Alabama But she was well known in the African American Community Used to work for the President of the NAACP Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was the pastor of a local church Called a meeting and said, the only way to fight is for no one, to ride the bus to work. She believed that "Quiet Strength" was the "Pathway to Freedom" It took a year for the Supreme Court to agree with her Segregation on transportation is unconstitutional In the land of the free, separate can't be equal Mother of the Civil Rights Movement She wears the crown Standing up for her rights just by sitting down Rosa Parks, can't you see you changed history As a nation we are grateful for eternity Like a rose, your lesson grows more and more each day The bus you rode has miles to go but we are on our way to be free One woman holding a candle in the dark and her name was Rosa Parks
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When did the Montgomery bus boycott start and end?

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The Montgomery bus boycott began on December 5, 1955, and ended on December 20, 1956, 381 days later.
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Why did the Montgomery bus boycott start?

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The Montgomery bus boycott was caused when Rosa Parks, an African American woman, refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white man. Because she refused, police came and arrested her. Soon after, Martin Luther King Jr. led a boycott against the public transportation system because it was unfair. Eventually the issue was brought to the supreme court and racial segregation on buses was deemed unconstotutional. Soon after,King was seen sharing a bus seat with Rev. Glen Smiley, a white man.
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What was the purpose of the Montgomery bus boycott?

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The purpose of the Montgomery bus boycott was to end racial segregation on the city bus system in a non-violent way, by creating economic hardship for the company. When African-Americans in the city of Montgomery, Alabama stopped riding the buses after Rosa Parks' arrest, ridership decreased by 80%. The bus company stubbornly held its ground, however, because they expected local police and politicians to disrupt the civil rights protest and dismantle the informal taxi system created by the African-American community. Both the city and the bus line hoped to coerce African-Americans into riding the buses instead of changing their segregation policies. The boycott finally ended after 381 days, when the US Supreme Court held segregation in public transportation is unconstitutional in the case Browder v. Gayle, (1956).