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Onomatopoeia

Onomatopoeia is a word that suggests or imitates the source of the sound that it describes. Common examples of this include animal noises, such as "meow," "oink," “ring” or "roar."

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Is swoop an onomatopoeia word?

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Yes

Is hollow a onomatopoeia?

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Only the lowest of the low level of hollows would be if any were. Like the lizards on Hueco Mundo. Orhime's brother talked to her while he was a hollow and when hollows become arrancar they go back to being human and have full conversations with humans. Menos dont talk at all in comparison.

What is a good onomatopoeia for train?

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swoosh,zoom,chugga,choo

What you have to underline in figures of speech?

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In figures of speech, it is important to underline the use of language beyond its literal meaning. Look for expressions that add meaning, imagery, or emphasis through the use of metaphor, simile, personification, hyperbole, irony, or other rhetorical devices. Also, pay attention to any shifts in language or unexpected comparisons that highlight the author's intent or deeper message.

What is a onomatopoeia for talk loudly?

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The onomatopoeia for talking loudly could be "yak" or "blabber."

Is the word tick an e example of what kind of speech?

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The word tick is an example of onomatopoeia. These are words that are derived from sounds, like snap, crackle and pop.

What is the functions of onomatopoeia?

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The function of onomatopoeia is to create sensory and auditory associations by imitating or representing the sounds associated with the words being used. It helps to bring a vivid and expressive quality to writing or speech, adding depth and enhancing the reader's or listener's experience. Onomatopoeia can also serve to create a specific atmosphere or mood by evoking familiar sounds.

What are 5 sentences of onomatopoeia?

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  1. Buzz! The bees were flying around the blooming flowers.
  2. Boom! The thunder rumbled loudly in the distance.
  3. Whoosh! The wind blew through the trees, making them sway.
  4. Sizzle! The bacon was cooking on the hot skillet.
  5. Splash! The child jumped into the pool, creating a big wave.

8 parts of figure of speech?

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I remember ethos, pathos, logos, and civil.

THE FIVE CANONS (Also added to the above) inventio- finding or researching one's subject matter dispositio- the arrangement of one's subject matter elocutio- filtering of language to target audience actio-performance memoria-training of the mind

What Words are associated with onomatopoeia?

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Words whose pronunciations resemble natural sounds, e.g. buzz, zoom, howl, snort.

What is a onamonapea?

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Samples of onomatopoeia?

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Crackle

Pop

Clunk

Bomb

Sizzle

Hiss

Plop

Pop

Kerplunk

Splash

Also: buzz, beep, whirr, click, clack, clatter, clink, achoo, bark, nay, moo, meow, shhhh.

*Onomatopoeia is a word that comes from the natural sound it is describing.)

5 Examples of Onomatopoeia?

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Hugh Bredin (1996) points out that you can put all the onomatopoeic words into three types. The first and most obvious type for him is direct onomatopoeia, as he calls. He suggests that it "occurs whenever two criteria are satisfied: (1) the denotation of a word is a class of sounds; and (2) the sound of the word resembles a member of the class." To explain it simply, the sound of the word resembles the sound that it names. Some typical examples are hiss, moan, cluck, whirr, and buzz. However, he also suggests that none of these words is exactly like the sound that it denotes. There are higher and lower degrees of onomatopoeic resemblance, and the number of words, such as hiss, which have quite a high degree of resemblance, is relatively small. The second type, he has suggested, is associative onomatopoeia. It occurs whenever the sound of a word resembles a sound associated with whatever it is that the word denotes. Some examples of this are: cuckoo, bubble, smash, whip. None of these words has a sound that resembles the objects or actions that they denote. For instance, cuckoo is the bird's name, but its acoustic resemblance is to the song that it produces, not the bird itself. The same applies to the other examples. When searching through materials I found an interesting example of associative onomatopoeia. The word barbarian, by which some foreigners called ancient Mongolians, is an example of this type. Its root, the Greek word barbaroi, was devised as a name for non-Greeks because their strange languages sounded to Greek ears like the stuttered syllables "ba-ba." Association is just as much a matter of degree as is acoustic resemblance. There is a close association of sound and object in the case of cuckoo, but a very slight association in the case of scratch or spatter. The third and final type of onomatopoeia is, as Bredin names, exemplary onomatopoeia. Its foundation rests upon the amount and character of the physical work used by a speaker in uttering a word. Words such as nimbleand dart require less muscular and pulmonary effort than do sluggish and slothful. Also, their stopped consonants encourage a speaker to say them sharply and quickly, whereas the latter two words can be drawn out slowly and lazily. The word sound nimble does not sound like anything that can be denoted by the word, and it cannot resemble the idea connoted by it, since sounds and concepts cannot "sound alike"; concepts have no sound. Instead, the word sound instantiates or exemplifies nimbleness, since it is itself a nimble sound.
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Is whistled onomatopoeia?

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Nope. It could of decended from onomatopoeia (i think i spelt that right), but it's now a verb or noun.

Is fluffy an onomatopoeia?

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No! Fluff is an object so how could the way it sound it possibly help represent the object?!

How is onomatopoeia used to write words you might use to describe the sound of walking on leaves?

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Swish, squeak. To begin to think about it, consider the sounds you would actually hear, walking on leaves. They could be dry, dead leaves, or damp leaves, or fresh green leaves recently shaken from a tree in a storm. What would you hear? What kinds of sounds? Probably you are thinking of dry leaves, so the crunching sounds of "cr" and "ch" come to mind. If it was a deep pile of leaves you might also hear the "sh" sound. You have to use your imagination, and identify the sounds you can hear in your imagination.

Let's say you have decided on "cr" and "ch" and "sh" sounds. What are words you can think of that contain those sounds? You can make a list:

crunched

criss-crossed

shallow

shimmering

crimson

crisp

crescent-shaped

... and so on. The main thing is, you know in your mind what the sound would be, and you are picking words that contain that same sort of sound. But, you also want to make sure that you can use those words without distracting from the idea of walking on fallen leaves. So,

credentials

charred

shamanic

shelved

crass

crazy

might not be words that would work for you. But there are plenty of words in the English language. The point is, to let your imagination roam free, considering the sound of the action being described, and let onomatopoetic emphasis add to the "punch" of your writing.

Is Snarled and Rattled an example of onomatopoieia?

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No, both words sound like they could be examples, however, the sound of both words are extinct from their original word. An example of onomatopoeia would be ding-dong since it represents a sound of a bell.

Is Hummed an onomatopoeia?

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No. Hum is though!

Is mmmm onomatopoeia?

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no -.-