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Literary Devices and Figures of Speech

Includes questions related to rules and methods used in literature and using words, terms and sentences in figurative or nonliteral ways;

5,673 Questions
Metaphors Metonymy and Synecdoche
Literary Devices and Figures of Speech
Allegory and Simile

What is the metaphor about someone who is very smart?

Metaphors used about someone perceived to be very smart might include:

[Name is] a real brain surgeon (provided [Name] isn't a real brain surgeon)

[Name is] a genuine rocket scientist (provided [Name] isn't a genuine rocket scientist)

[Name is] a total Einstein

[Name's] brain's an Apple Mac

[Name's] mind is Intel enhanced (provided the person saying this isn't someone who believes the 'Intel Inside' label is known to technicians as the 'Warning Sticker')

You might also want similes about someone who is very smart? There are quite a few, including:

[Name is] a smart cookie

[Name is] so sharp they'll cut themselves

And, all beginning with As…, as in '[Name] is as…

…bright as a button

…bright as a lightbulb

…clever as [name of someone famous for being very clever] - Einstein, and so on

…clever as a cartload [US: wagonload] of monkeys

…clever as a fox

…cute as a fox

…sharp as a [very sharp thing] - tack, razor, or other sharp instrument

…smart as [name of someone famous for being smart] - Einstein, and so on

…smart as a whip

These could all lose the 'As…', and be expressed '[Name is] bright like a lightbulb'; '[Name is] cute like a fox', and so on.

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Literary Devices and Figures of Speech

What can be wasted but never bought?

time

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Literary Devices and Figures of Speech

What figure of speech is - the vuvuzelas shrieked?

alliteration

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History, Politics & Society
Literary Devices and Figures of Speech

What does 'of beauty rich and rare' mean?

you are trying to say two words in a sentence I can see that. well first we gotta define where are those words I mean what are these words, is it (1)WHAT IS THE MEANING OF & (2) BEAUTY RICH AND RARE ?

cause if that's the case then your question would be

what is the meaning of beauty rich and rare?

and the answer is

one who naturally born an ongoing invention of beauty on her or himself especially rare beauties that will cause your tongue to be dripping because of its one of a kind

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France in WW2
Literary Devices and Figures of Speech

What does as welcome as a skunk at a lawn party mean?

Unless it has had its musk gland removed, a skunk would not be very welcome at a lawn party because it would be frightened by human presence and might because of this spray to protect itself from perceived danger. This possibility would drive the guests away from the party due to the rancorous aroma a skunk can produce. That would not be the desired situation of either the guests or especially the host. Therefore this phrase is an analogy implying that whatever is "as welcome as a skunk at a lawn party" is very unwelcome.

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English Spelling and Pronunciation
Literary Devices and Figures of Speech

How do you spell fopa?

A social error or blunder is called a faux pas (French, false step).

The pronunciation is "foh pah" or "foe pa".

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Idioms, Cliches, and Slang
Literary Devices and Figures of Speech

He was a lion in the fight.what is the figure of speech?

"He was a lion in the fight" is a metaphor.

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Saints
Literary Devices and Figures of Speech

Use incorruptible in a sentence?

The bodies of some saints have remained incorruptible even centuries after they died.

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Literary Devices and Figures of Speech

What is an armchair expert?

An armchair expert is someone who knows a lot about a subject, but has little practical experience with it. For example, a fat person who knows a lot about losing weight is an armchair expert.

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History, Politics & Society
Literary Devices and Figures of Speech

What does 'mode of expression' mean?

Mode of expression as it refers to the character emotion of the sentence

interrogative- question..."What time is it?"

Declarative- answer..."It's Four O'clock."

Imperative- "Hurry up then!"

Mode of expression as it refers to the nature of the expressor would be whimsical, cinical, crass, etc.

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Poetry
Literary Devices and Figures of Speech
Poetic Forms

What is a 7 line verse called?

rondelet or septet

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Definitions
Literary Devices and Figures of Speech

What Though come to think of it means?

It means, "Well, now that I've thought about it..."

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Word and Phrase Origins
Literary Devices and Figures of Speech

Is there a word meaning argument which builds upon itself?

It's called begging the question. Also called circular logic.

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Word Games
Adjectives and Articles
Literary Devices and Figures of Speech

Examples of the suffix ology?

  • aetiology
  • analogy
  • anthology
  • biology
  • cardiology
  • cosmetology
  • cosmology
  • cryptology
  • doxology
  • dermatology
  • ecology
  • etymology
  • etiology
  • glaciology
  • geology
  • gemology
  • gerontology
  • genealogy
  • histology
  • hematology
  • homology
  • immunology
  • lithology
  • meteorology
  • methodology
  • mythology
  • neurology
  • numerology
  • oncology
  • oenology
  • physiology
  • psychology
  • psychiatry
  • pathology
  • paleontology
  • pedagogy
  • radiology
  • scatology
  • sinology
  • serology
  • sociology
  • toxicology
  • urology
  • zoology
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School Subjects
Literary Devices and Figures of Speech

The term deafening silence in an example of which literary device?

It would be an oxymoron.

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English Language
Literary Devices and Figures of Speech

What things to remember while writing telegram?

Stop.

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Word Games
Literary Devices and Figures of Speech
Prefixes Suffixes and Root Words

What words start with the prefix cent?

Central, cent, centaur, century, center, centrifuge

EDIT:

  • CENT
  • CENTAI
  • CENTAL
  • CENTALS
  • CENTARE
  • CENTARES
  • CENTAS
  • CENTAUR
  • CENTAUREA
  • CENTAUREAS
  • CENTAURIC
  • CENTAURIES
  • CENTAURS
  • CENTAURY
  • CENTAVO
  • CENTAVOS
  • CENTENARIAN
  • CENTENARIANS
  • CENTENARIES
  • CENTENARY
  • CENTENNIAL
  • CENTENNIALLY
  • CENTENNIALS
  • CENTER
  • CENTERBOARD
  • CENTERBOARDS
  • CENTERED
  • CENTEREDNESS
  • CENTEREDNESSES
  • CENTERFOLD
  • CENTERFOLDS
  • CENTERING
  • CENTERINGS
  • CENTERLESS
  • CENTERLINE
  • CENTERLINES
  • CENTERPIECE
  • CENTERPIECES
  • CENTERS
  • CENTESES
  • CENTESIMAL
  • CENTESIMI
  • CENTESIMO
  • CENTESIMOS
  • CENTESIS
  • CENTIARE
  • CENTIARES
  • CENTIGRADE
  • CENTIGRAM
  • CENTIGRAMS
  • CENTILE
  • CENTILES
  • CENTILITER
  • CENTILITERS
  • CENTILLION
  • CENTILLIONS
  • CENTIME
  • CENTIMES
  • CENTIMETER
  • CENTIMETERS
  • CENTIMO
  • CENTIMORGAN
  • CENTIMORGANS
  • CENTIMOS
  • CENTIPEDE
  • CENTIPEDES
  • CENTNER
  • CENTNERS
  • CENTO
  • CENTONES
  • CENTOS
  • CENTRA
  • CENTRAL
  • CENTRALER
  • CENTRALEST
  • CENTRALISE
  • CENTRALISED
  • CENTRALISES
  • CENTRALISING
  • CENTRALISM
  • CENTRALISMS
  • CENTRALIST
  • CENTRALISTIC
  • CENTRALISTS
  • CENTRALITIES
  • CENTRALITY
  • CENTRALIZATION
  • CENTRALIZATIONS
  • CENTRALIZE
  • CENTRALIZED
  • CENTRALIZER
  • CENTRALIZERS
  • CENTRALIZES
  • CENTRALIZING
  • CENTRALLY
  • CENTRALS
  • CENTRE
  • CENTRED
  • CENTRES
  • CENTRIC
  • CENTRICAL
  • CENTRICALLY
  • CENTRICITIES
  • CENTRICITY
  • CENTRIFUGAL
  • CENTRIFUGALLY
  • CENTRIFUGALS
  • CENTRIFUGATION
  • CENTRIFUGATIONS
  • CENTRIFUGE
  • CENTRIFUGED
  • CENTRIFUGES
  • CENTRIFUGING
  • CENTRING
  • CENTRINGS
  • CENTRIOLE
  • CENTRIOLES
  • CENTRIPETAL
  • CENTRIPETALLY
  • CENTRISM
  • CENTRISMS
  • CENTRIST
  • CENTRISTS
  • CENTROID
  • CENTROIDS
  • CENTROMERE
  • CENTROMERES
  • CENTROMERIC
  • CENTROSOME
  • CENTROSOMES
  • CENTROSYMMETRIC
  • CENTRUM
  • CENTRUMS
  • CENTS
  • CENTU
  • CENTUM
  • CENTUMS
  • CENTUPLE
  • CENTUPLED
  • CENTUPLES
  • CENTUPLING
  • CENTURIAL
  • CENTURIES
  • CENTURION
  • CENTURIONS
  • CENTURY
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Acronyms & Abbreviations
Definitions
Literary Devices and Figures of Speech

Examples of suffix -ly?

Quickly, happily, hesitantly, eagerly, stupidly, gloriously.

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Literary Devices and Figures of Speech

What figure of speech is the ball flew?

Personification

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Acronyms & Abbreviations
Literary Devices and Figures of Speech

What is abbreviation for Wireless?

WIFI

299300301
Metaphors Metonymy and Synecdoche
English Language
Literary Devices and Figures of Speech

How can you find examples of a metaphor in reading passages?

Use of metaphors in the English language is so common that we rarely realise they are being used.

A metaphor is: a descriptive term (a word or expression) applied to an object or action, but the description itself is not literally applicable to the thing being described.

(Note: A metaphor is not to be confused with a simile. A simile is a comparison of two unlike things using the words 'like' or 'as', for example 'as cold as ice'.)

The word metaphor has Latin origins, and means 'carry across, transfer'. A metaphor carries across or transfers the meaning from one situation and applies it to another.

AN EXAMPLE OF A METAPHOR

Someone might refer to 'a glaring error', but errors aren't literally 'glaring', because the word glaring in its literal sense means 'gleaming/shining fiercely/brightly in an uncomfortable way', such as the 'glare of the sun', or 'I was blinded by the glare of the headlights of the oncoming vehicles.' Applying the metaphor 'glaring' to an error means that the error is clearly evident.

IDENTIFYING METAPHORS

To identify metaphors when reading passages, first look for a term that describes something, then see if that term has a more literal meaning, one that is not usually used with reference to the word or situation currently being described. If you can find one, it is probably a metaphor.

Some examples:

he spoke cold words of little comfort

a gene map

a sad willow tree

primordial soup

to bailout the banks

road map to peace

toxic assets

"My new motor bike cost me an arm and a leg, but hey, you should see her fly!"

Metaphoric prose:"The fog comes

on little cat feet.

It sits looking

over harbor and city

on silent haunches

and then moves on."

From the Fog by Carl Sandburg

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Hyperbole and Superlative
English Language
Parts of Speech
Literary Devices and Figures of Speech

What are the 8 figures of speech?

There are actually 9 and they are:

Articles, nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, conjunctions, prepositions, and interjections.

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Math and Arithmetic
Word and Phrase Origins
Literary Devices and Figures of Speech

What does it mean if they say numeric numbers?

Numeric numbers are those written with the symbol, e.g. 1, 2, 3... This goes along with alphabetic numbers which are those written out in letters, e.g., one, two, three...

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Literary Devices and Figures of Speech
Hyperbole and Superlative

Can you give me an hyperbole for fire?

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Poetry
Word Play, Puns, and Oxymorons
Literary Devices and Figures of Speech

What are some examples of oxymoronic poetry?

Some well-known examples of oxymoronic poetry include the following:

Yesterday upon the stair

I met a man who wasn't there

He wasn't there again today

Oh, how I wish he'd go away

[William Hughes Mearns; 1899]

One fine day, quite late at night

Two dead boys got up to fight.

Back to back they faced each other,

Drew their swords and shot each other.

A deaf policeman heard the noise

and came and killed those two dead boys.

[anon]

O brawling love, O loving hate,

O any thing of nothing first create!

O heavy lightness, serious vanity,

Misshapen chaos of well-seeming forms!,

Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health,

Still-waking sleep, that is not what it is!'

[Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet; circa 1591-5]

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