Rome (modern)

Founded on April 21, 753 BC, Rome is the capital of Italy. Although the city has ancient roots, it has grown into a modern civilization. The Vatican City is located within Rome. Rome is one of the most visited cities in the world, and is the home to UNESCO World Heritages sites.

1,394 Questions
History of Europe
Rome (modern)

When did Rome rise?

Rome rose was in 509 B.C

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Roman Empire
Rome (modern)

What peoples invaded Rome?

Britannia, Gallia, Hispania, Italian peninsula

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Rome (modern)

How ancient Rome effect us today?

they made many laws and tought us about our very own culture.....

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History, Politics & Society
History of Europe
Ancient History
Rome (modern)

How did rome develop?

Romans develop by putting their taxes high. by putting their taxes high they used the money by helping their country, by putting aqueducts and more roads for health and movement.

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History of Europe
Roman Empire
Ancient Rome
Rome (modern)

Who named Rome?

The origin is quite uncertain. It has often been held to be a variant on Romulus, the legendary co-founder. This site discusses alternatives: http://www.theromanforum.com/articolo.asp?ID=730

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Italy
World Heritage Sites
Rome (modern)

When did the colosseum become a world heritage site?

The Colosseum (as a part of the Historic Centre of Rome) became a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1980.

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Dictatorship
Rome (modern)

Was Rome a dictatorship?

No, it was an autocracy type of government.

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Rome (modern)

What arena in ancient Rome is still standing today?

The Coliseum

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Rome (modern)

What is the difference between ancient Rome houses and houses of today?

The Roman House Early Italian houses grouped around the atrium, with a small garden, the so-called hortus, at the back.

The classic Roman house, however, was divided into two parts. The first part grouped around the atrium, the second around the peristylium. The peristylium having developed out of the earlier hortus. The atrium and the peristylium were perfect adaptions to the heat of the Mediterranean. They were open to the sky, letting fresh air in to circulate among the corridors and rooms.

In the atrium a small pool, the impluvium would catch the rainwater, whereas in the peristylium, the rain would water the plants. Further to the impluvium there was an underground tank connected to it which could catch any excess rainwater. The Roman house is very much a house built for the people of southern Europe. So much so, that when the Romans built their houses in northern Italy or the northern European provinces, they adopted a system of heating, circulating warm air under the floors and along the walls. It was constructed to face inward. Meaning it generally had no windows at all, but drew its air and light from the openings of the atrium and peristylium.

The house was normally only built on the ground floor, and if there was a first floor, it was small and limited to few rooms.

Rooms were designed for one specific purpose only, the triclinium being for dining, a cubiculum for sleeping, etc. An interesting thing to note about the layout of the Roman house, is that the names given to the front part of the house around the atrium are Latin, whereas those in the back are largely Greek. The typical Roman house was, in general, only occupied by one family. (Although one must consider that Roman families were generally enlarged families, including several generations.) Vestibulum and Fauces A Roman house did not open directly onto the road, but into a small passage way, the vestibulum, the corridor which led from the main door onwards into the atrium was called the fauces. The Posticum Aside from the main door, there was a servants' entrance, the posticum, usually positioned at the side of the house. It was used slaves, servants, humble visitors or sometimes even by the master of the house, who sought to leave the house unnoticed by the prying eyes of onlookers in the main street. The Atrium The atrium originally was the bedroom of the mother of the family in an old Latin household. Hence a bed lectus genialis stood opposite the main entrance. The Romans kept the bed standing, as a symbol of the sanctity of marriage (the bride was still placed upon it by the groom as part of the marriage ceremony). But to them it served only symbolic use.

A further symbol connected with the atrium was the hearth. In early houses the hearth, which all its symbolisms of homeliness, was situated in the atrium the centre of the house and domestic life.

But the more classic Roman houses don't have a hearth in the atrium. In fact it remains unclear where the highly symbolic hearth was thereafter moved to. The impluvium was the shallow pool sunk into the floor to catch the rainwater. Some surviving examples are beautifully decorated. The opening in the ceiling above the pool called for some means of support for the roof. And it is here where one differentiates between five different styles of atrium.

atrium tuscanium: this type had no columns. The weight of the ceiling was carried by the rafters. though expensive to build, this seems to have been the most widespread type of atriumin the Roman house.

atrium tetrastylum: this type had one column at each corner of the impluvium.

atrium corinthium: this type was similar to the atrium tetrastylum but had a greater opening in the roof and a greater number of columns.

atrium displuviatum: the roof actually sloped towards the side walls, a large rainwater therefore ran off into other outlets than the impluvium.

atrium testudinatum: this atrium had no opening in the roof at all and was only seen in small, unimportant houses. As the centrepiece of the house The atrium was the most lavishly furnished room. Also it contained the little chapel to the ancestral spirits (lararium), the household safe (arca) and sometimes a bust of the master of the house. The Tablinum The tablinum was the large reception room of the house. It was situated between the atrium and the peristylium. The tablinum generally had no wall separating it from the atrium at all and little if any walls dividing it from the peristylium. It was only separated from the atrium by a curtain which could easily be drawn back and toward the peristylium it was separated by a wooden screen or wide doors. Hence if the doors/screens and curtains of the tablinum were all opened to increase ventilation during a hot day, one could see from the atrium through the tablinum into the peristylium. In the early days, the tablinum would have acted as the study of the head of the family, the paterfamilias. The Alae The alae(alae is the plural of ala, the word ala means 'wing') were the open rooms on each side of the atrium. Their use is largely unknown today. One knows that in the early Italian houses, which had a covered atrium, the alaehad windows to allow light to enter the house. However, with the introduction of the opening in the roof above the atrium and the general abandoning of windows in the Roman house, the alae became largely obsolete. It appears more that they were incorporated into the house in accordance to tradition, rather than for any specific use. The Triclinium The tricliniumwas the Roman dining room. In earlier days the meals were eaten in the atrium, the tablinum, or a dining room above the tablinum, known as the cenaculum.

But with the introduction of the Greek practice of reclining when eating, the triclinium was set aside as a room especially for dining in.

In fact, in many houses once would find several triclinia, rooms designated as dining areas, allowing the family a choice of which room to eat in on any particular day. The Andron The andron was the name given to a passageway from the atrium to the peristylium. The Peristylium The peristylium (sometimes called the peristyle in English) was in effect the garden of the house. Though in the case of the Roman house, it was incorporated into the house itself and was usually surrounded by columns supporting the roof.

In it were grown herbs and flowers, particularly roses, violets and lilies it appears.

Small statues and statuettes and other ornamental artwork or outdoor furniture would adorn the space which, on sunny days, would be used as an outside dining area. The Exhedra and the OecusJust as the tablinum lay behind the atrium, continuing the space down the center line of the house, so did the exhedra extend behind the peristylium. It was a spacious room, of similar proportions to the tablinum and acted as a large communal dining room or a lounge. The oecus(from the Greek oikos for 'house' or 'room') appears to have been the same thing as the exhedra, but by a different name. If the inside of this room was decorated by columns lining the walls, it was known as a oecus corinthium. The Cubiculum The cubiculum was the bedroom of the Roman house.

Those bedrooms situated around the atrium tended to be smaller than those round the peristylium. To the Romans these rooms were apparently of less importance than the other rooms of the house. The ceilings were vaulted and lower above the bed, often making the room appear a cramped and stuffy place.

According to the apparent tradition of the Roman house of giving each room a very specific use, the floor mosaics of the cubiculum often clearly marked out the rectangle where the bed was to be placed.

Sometimes in front of the bedroom there was a small antechamber, the procoeton, where a personal servant would sleep. The Taberna The taberna could be a room in the Roman house which surrounded the atrium, but which had its own entrance from the outside and didn't lead into the interior of the house. These little rooms hence could be used as shops. Usually there was a brick counter to display goods by the entrance. Inside there usually one or more back rooms. There normally was a floor added, cutting the tall room in half to create two low floors, the upper floor being called the pergula. These cramped flats housed the very poor, perhaps a poor client family loyal to the family who inhabited the house.

A taberna though was not necessarily meant as housing for tenants, but could also be a simple shed in which to keep various things not suitable for storage indoors.

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Italy
Ancient Rome
Rome (modern)

Is Rome in Italy?

fart cakes eat pipi

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Rome (modern)

How is life in a modern city similar to life in ancient rome?

City life in Ancient Rome and modern cities are similarby there is a lot of interacting and socializing with neighbors and attending local restaurants and events.
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Italy
Rome (modern)

Where is Rome?

There are many cities or towns named Rome. For example, there is a small town in Texas named Rome, as well as Rome, NY, and Rome, Georgia.

The most famous one is in the province of Lazio, in a regioncalled Latium, in the western central part of Italy. Although not a coastal city it is 16 miles from the coast of the Tyrrhenian Sea. (Flying in to Rome's international airport - Leonardo DaVinci - you often approach over water). The coordinates of Rome are 41.54° N, 12.27° E.

Rome is actually the capital of Italy and big enough to completely surround the Vatican City, the home of the pope.
Colarado and occasionally in my back yard. it all depends on how my cat feels.

There is a Rome in New York, but the famous one is in Italy.

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Rome (modern)

What is the latitude and longitude of Rome?

Latitude: 41 degrees 54 minutes north

Longitude:12 degrees 30 minutes east
Every point on earth has a different set of latitude/longitude coordinates,

and there are a huge number of different points in Rome.

The center of the Colosseum is located at

41.8902° north latitude

12.4923° east longitude.

Other places in the city have different coordinates.


Rome's latitude and longitude are listed as 41.54N and 12.27E, respectively. However, for all practical purposes, the Piazza Venezia is considered the central hub of Rome through which most major thoroughfares intersect. It's coordinates are listed as: 41.8964N and 12.4825E

================================

The center of the Colosseum is located at

41.8902° north latitude
12.4923° east longitude.

Other spots around town have different coordinates.

313233
History of Europe
Roman Numerals
Roman Empire
Ancient Rome
Rome (modern)

How did rome recuperate?

From what? If you mean "How did the Roman Empirerecuperate after its fall", then of course it didn't. OTOH,the city of Rome gradually recovered in the Middle Ages, partly because Italy as a whole was getting richer and more urbanised again, and partly because being the seat of the Popes made it into something of a "world capital" again.

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Rome (modern)

What contributions did ancient Rome make to modern architecture?

"The story of the world, is the story of Rome." Said Napoleon Bonaparte. There are dozens if not hundreds of things the ancient Romans have contributed to the modern world. Latin as a language is the foundation for Spanish, Portuguese, and Italian. They created the first true concrete. They perfected the arch and dome in architecture. The Circus Maximus and Colosseum are still copied for just about every stadium in the world. The words czar and kaiser are both derived from Caesar. Their quality of life would still be considered better then most modern 3rd world countries because of their advances in sanitation and aqueducts. They could be credited with the art of city planning. They built the same city in hundreds of different newly conquered territories. Roman roads changed how the world traveled and their basic design is still copied today. In the 4th century C.E. they made Christianity the official religion of the empire spreading it throughout the world. Some of their generals military tactics are still studied today at West Point and other academies. Just about anything in the modern western world could be traced back to ancient Rome.

313233
Italy
Flight Times
Athens
Rome (modern)

How many hours does it take by plane from Rome Italy to Athen Greece?

The results of your search for Rome (ROM) to Athens (ATH)

Shortest Flight Duration 2 hours 0 mins

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Rome (modern)

What is ancient Rome called today?

Italy

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Rome (modern)

What are some things ancient Rome and modern Rome have in common?

Even though modern Rome has evolved from ancient Rome, they have a few things in common. Both are the same location. Both are the capitals of the country and both are the most populous city in Italy.

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Cleopatra
Rome (modern)

Did Cleopatra hurt Rome or help Rome?

Cleopatra could in no way hurt Rome. She was a minor queen of a weak country with no military to speak of. However she actually helped Rome. By her defeat she enabled the civil wars to end and the Pax Romana to begin.

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Ancient Rome
Rome (modern)

Where is ancient Rome?

The Roman Empire included a large sum of Europe. The Holy Roman Empire(Medieval Period) expanded over all of western Europe and bordered the Byzantine Empire. The city of Rome is located on the Italian Peninsula.

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Italy in WW2
History of Italy
Benito Mussolini
Rome (modern)

March on Rome?

The March On Rome was a reason for Mussolini becoming Prime Minister in 1922.

Fascist blackshirts lead by the ras, took over communication buildings and other structures to show to dominance of the Fascist Party. The King Victor Emmanuel II could have stopped the Fascists from causing anymore attacks by sending in the army but he didn't and the Liberal government at this time stepped down and refused to fight the Fascists.

The King recognised strong leadership and support of Fascism so he made Mussolini Prime Minister in 1922.

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Roman Empire
Julius Caesar
Ancient Rome
Rome (modern)

Who discovered Rome?

romulus and remus discovered it 753bc April 21first

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Rome (modern)

What are the differences between the roles of women in ancient rome and modern day rome?

There was actually little difference between ancient Roman women and modern women. Yes, I'm aware of the fact that ancient women lived in a male dominated society, were under the control of their fathers or husbands, etc, etc. However this was the "ideal" woman or wife. The reality was quite different. The ancient ladies could advance in society or run a business just as the men and many of them did. Julius Caesar's mother controlled her family's finances, as did Cicero's wife, Terentia. Fulvia was the richest woman in Rome and even raised an army. In domestic matters, she, and not the husband ruled. Examples are Marc Antony's father and Cicero's brother, Quintus, and even Cicero himself. The modern Roman woman, unlike her ancient grandmothers, has the freedom to vote and to hold political office.

There was actually little difference between ancient Roman women and modern women. Yes, I'm aware of the fact that ancient women lived in a male dominated society, were under the control of their fathers or husbands, etc, etc. However this was the "ideal" woman or wife. The reality was quite different. The ancient ladies could advance in society or run a business just as the men and many of them did. Julius Caesar's mother controlled her family's finances, as did Cicero's wife, Terentia. Fulvia was the richest woman in Rome and even raised an army. In domestic matters, she, and not the husband ruled. Examples are Marc Antony's father and Cicero's brother, Quintus, and even Cicero himself. The modern Roman woman, unlike her ancient grandmothers, has the freedom to vote and to hold political office.

There was actually little difference between ancient Roman women and modern women. Yes, I'm aware of the fact that ancient women lived in a male dominated society, were under the control of their fathers or husbands, etc, etc. However this was the "ideal" woman or wife. The reality was quite different. The ancient ladies could advance in society or run a business just as the men and many of them did. Julius Caesar's mother controlled her family's finances, as did Cicero's wife, Terentia. Fulvia was the richest woman in Rome and even raised an army. In domestic matters, she, and not the husband ruled. Examples are Marc Antony's father and Cicero's brother, Quintus, and even Cicero himself. The modern Roman woman, unlike her ancient grandmothers, has the freedom to vote and to hold political office.

There was actually little difference between ancient Roman women and modern women. Yes, I'm aware of the fact that ancient women lived in a male dominated society, were under the control of their fathers or husbands, etc, etc. However this was the "ideal" woman or wife. The reality was quite different. The ancient ladies could advance in society or run a business just as the men and many of them did. Julius Caesar's mother controlled her family's finances, as did Cicero's wife, Terentia. Fulvia was the richest woman in Rome and even raised an army. In domestic matters, she, and not the husband ruled. Examples are Marc Antony's father and Cicero's brother, Quintus, and even Cicero himself. The modern Roman woman, unlike her ancient grandmothers, has the freedom to vote and to hold political office.

There was actually little difference between ancient Roman women and modern women. Yes, I'm aware of the fact that ancient women lived in a male dominated society, were under the control of their fathers or husbands, etc, etc. However this was the "ideal" woman or wife. The reality was quite different. The ancient ladies could advance in society or run a business just as the men and many of them did. Julius Caesar's mother controlled her family's finances, as did Cicero's wife, Terentia. Fulvia was the richest woman in Rome and even raised an army. In domestic matters, she, and not the husband ruled. Examples are Marc Antony's father and Cicero's brother, Quintus, and even Cicero himself. The modern Roman woman, unlike her ancient grandmothers, has the freedom to vote and to hold political office.

There was actually little difference between ancient Roman women and modern women. Yes, I'm aware of the fact that ancient women lived in a male dominated society, were under the control of their fathers or husbands, etc, etc. However this was the "ideal" woman or wife. The reality was quite different. The ancient ladies could advance in society or run a business just as the men and many of them did. Julius Caesar's mother controlled her family's finances, as did Cicero's wife, Terentia. Fulvia was the richest woman in Rome and even raised an army. In domestic matters, she, and not the husband ruled. Examples are Marc Antony's father and Cicero's brother, Quintus, and even Cicero himself. The modern Roman woman, unlike her ancient grandmothers, has the freedom to vote and to hold political office.

There was actually little difference between ancient Roman women and modern women. Yes, I'm aware of the fact that ancient women lived in a male dominated society, were under the control of their fathers or husbands, etc, etc. However this was the "ideal" woman or wife. The reality was quite different. The ancient ladies could advance in society or run a business just as the men and many of them did. Julius Caesar's mother controlled her family's finances, as did Cicero's wife, Terentia. Fulvia was the richest woman in Rome and even raised an army. In domestic matters, she, and not the husband ruled. Examples are Marc Antony's father and Cicero's brother, Quintus, and even Cicero himself. The modern Roman woman, unlike her ancient grandmothers, has the freedom to vote and to hold political office.

There was actually little difference between ancient Roman women and modern women. Yes, I'm aware of the fact that ancient women lived in a male dominated society, were under the control of their fathers or husbands, etc, etc. However this was the "ideal" woman or wife. The reality was quite different. The ancient ladies could advance in society or run a business just as the men and many of them did. Julius Caesar's mother controlled her family's finances, as did Cicero's wife, Terentia. Fulvia was the richest woman in Rome and even raised an army. In domestic matters, she, and not the husband ruled. Examples are Marc Antony's father and Cicero's brother, Quintus, and even Cicero himself. The modern Roman woman, unlike her ancient grandmothers, has the freedom to vote and to hold political office.

There was actually little difference between ancient Roman women and modern women. Yes, I'm aware of the fact that ancient women lived in a male dominated society, were under the control of their fathers or husbands, etc, etc. However this was the "ideal" woman or wife. The reality was quite different. The ancient ladies could advance in society or run a business just as the men and many of them did. Julius Caesar's mother controlled her family's finances, as did Cicero's wife, Terentia. Fulvia was the richest woman in Rome and even raised an army. In domestic matters, she, and not the husband ruled. Examples are Marc Antony's father and Cicero's brother, Quintus, and even Cicero himself. The modern Roman woman, unlike her ancient grandmothers, has the freedom to vote and to hold political office.

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Ancient Rome
Rome (modern)

Tribe that founded rome?

Tribunes

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