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Because the lungs in the featal pig don't work yet

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Q: Why is it important for the fetal pig heart to have both a ductus anteriosus and the foramen ovale but not good for the adult heart to have these features?
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6 structures needed for fetal circulation?

Umbilical Arteries Placenta Umbilical Vein Ductus Venosus Foramen Ovale Ductus Arteriosus


What happens in fetal pig circulation?

There are three major differences between normal circulatory pathways and fetal circulation. First, as you have already learned, oxygenated blood that is high in nutrients obtained from the placenta enters the fetal pig body not from lung capillaries, but via the umbilical vein to the ductus venosus in the liver. The ductus venosus leads in turn to the caudal vena cava, through which the blood enters the right atrium. The second major difference is the presence in fetal pigs of an opening between the heart atria (through the interatrial septum), called the foramen ovale. Oxygenated blood entering the right atrium from the caudal vena cava tends to pass through the foramen ovale into the left atrium, thus bypassing the pulmonary circulation system. Deoxygenated blood from the cranial vena cava enters the atrium anteriorly and flows into the right ventricle. As a result of this arrangement, there is little mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. A third major difference is the action of the ductus arteriosus vessel, which shunts blood away from the fetal pig's lungs and into the aorta. Highly oxygenated blood in the left atrium is pumped into the left ventricle and then into the aorta. It then enters the coronary arteries and the arteries of the head region, before mixing with deoxygenated blood from the ductus arteriosus and the lower systemic circulation.


What adaptive advantage is gained by the ductus arteriosus' closure at birth in a fetal pig?

The ductus arteriosus closes at birth in pigs and becomes the ligamentum arteriosum. This allows the pulmonary artery to function properly.


Difference between postnatal circulation and fetal circulation?

The specialized systm for supplying oxygenated blood to fetal organs bypassing the fetal lungs. Fetus take oxygen and nutrient from placenta. In fetus there are a few specialized structures by which fetal blood bypass the non functional lungs. These are; 1. Foramen Ovale 2. Ductus Arteriosus 3. Ductus venosus The deoxygenated blood is carried to the placenta via umblical artries and from there oxygenated blood is carried back via umblical vein. On its way back to heart this blood is passed through liver but liver is only partialy functional so most of the blood bypass the portal circulation via DUCTUS VENOSUS. Then blood enters the right atrium via inferior vena cava. From where this blood is carried to left atrium through FORAMEN OVALE. And then through the left heart to the body. Specially head and upper limb region. While the deoxygenated blood from the body is carried via the superior vena cava to the right atrium from where this blood is pumped into right ventricle to the lungs. But only 12% blood is gone to the lungs and the rest is gone via umblical artry to placenta bypassing the pulmonary circulation through DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS.


What are the tubes in which the sperm have to travel through on the way out of the body?

The sperm are formed in tubes called seminiferous tubules. They then travel into the epididymus (another tubule network), up through the ductus/vas deferens (another tube) up the front of the pelvis then over the top of the bladder nad back down posterior to it. Here they enter the ejaculatory duct (another tube) which empties into the urethra (another tube). Take you pick.

Related questions

Why is it important for the fetal heart to have both the ductus arteriosus and the foramen ovale but not good for the adult heart to have these?

The ductus arteriosus and foramen ovale are important for systemic circulation. This is the type of circulation maintained by fetal pigs but the adult heart requires pulmonary and systemic circulation.


Why is it important for the fetal heart to have both the ductus arteriosus and the foramen ovale but not good for the adult heart to have these feature?

The ductus arteriosus and foramen ovale are important for systemic circulation. This is the type of circulation maintained by fetal pigs but the adult heart requires pulmonary and systemic circulation.


6 structures needed for fetal circulation?

Umbilical Arteries Placenta Umbilical Vein Ductus Venosus Foramen Ovale Ductus Arteriosus


Formen ovale Ductus arteriosus Ductus venosus what will these shunts become in a newborn?

The foramen ovale closes, becoming part of the interatrial septum. The Ductus arteriosus becomes the ligamentum arteriosum and the ductus venosus becomes the ligamentum venosum.


What structure serves as the lungs for a fetus?

The structure that allows blood to bypass a fetus inmmature liver is called ductus venosus.


What is the structure in the fetus that allows blood to bypass the lungs?

An valvular hole in the interatrial septum called the foramen ovale.


What would happen to the child if the umbilical umbilical vein ductus venosus ductus arteriosus and foramen ovale did not close?

foramen ovale is present in between the left and right arteries.so if that is not closed then the deoxygenated and oxygenated blood from the left and right arteries respectively will get mixed causing complications in respiration.soetimes this occurs in children known as blue baby syndrome.


What do the ductus arteriosus and the foramen ovale become at birth?

Ligamentum arteriosum and the fossa ovalis. That is to say the arterial ligament and the oval depression (found in the left ventricle).


What do the foramen ovale and ductus arteriosus do?

That is a very good question! In case of the fetus, the blood flow through the lungs is closed. So most of the blood passes through the foramen ovale to left atrium. Some blood goes to right ventricle. it is pumped by the right ventricle into pulmonary aorta. This blood passes to systemic aorta via ductus arteriosus. Both the blood flows stops after the birth of the baby. Baby takes a first breath. Blood starts to flow through the lungs. Due to pressure changes the foramen ovale get closed. By the same reason the ductus arteriosus get closed, as the circular muscles of the artery can contract.


What were Two remnants of fetal structures are observable in the heart what were they called in the fetal heart?

Fossa ovalis and ligamentum. Fossa ovalis -> foramen lovale Ligamentum-> Ductus arteriosus


What is function of ductus venosus in the fetus?

In the fetus, the ductus venosus shunts a significant majority (80%) of the blood flow of the umbilical vein directly to the inferior vena cava. Thus, it allows oxygenated blood from the placenta to bypass the liver. In conjunction with the other fetal shunts, the foramen ovale and ductus arteriosus, it plays a critical role in preferentially shunting oxygenated blood to the fetal brain.Source(s):http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ductus_veno…


What fetal shunt bypasses the lungs by directly connecting the right atrium and the left atrium?

In the fetal heart, the foramen ovale (or ostium secundum of Born) allows blood to enter the left atrium from the right atrium. It is one of two shunts, the other being the ductus arteriosus, that allows blood entering the right atrium to bypass the pulmonary circulation. Another similar adaptation in the fetus is the ductus venosus. In most individuals, the foramen ovale (pronounced /fɒˈreɪmən oʊˈvɑːli/) closes at birth. It later forms the fossa ovalis. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foramen_ovale_(heart) In the fetal heart, the foramen ovale (or ostium secundum of Born) allows blood to enter the left atrium from the right atrium. It is one of two shunts, the other being the ductus arteriosus, that allows blood entering the right atrium to bypass the pulmonary circulation. Another similar adaptation in the fetus is the ductus venosus. In most individuals, the foramen ovale (pronounced /fɒˈreɪmən oʊˈvɑːli/) closes at birth. It later forms the fossa ovalis. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foramen_ovale_(heart)