Unanswered | Answered

English Spelling and Pronunciation

Parent Category: Grammar
Please do not correct misspelled words in the question if it asking how to spell a certain word. This category is related to forming words with letters and the ways in which words are spoken.

Subcategories

You spell it the exact same way you spelled it. MEASURING.
Yes, bight is a word. It doesn't mean bite, though, it refers to a  large bay of water, such as the Bight of Biafra. Occasionally it  can be used to mean a bend in any geographical feature.
The term is spelled as one word "granddaughter."
yes check-up should be hyphenated
You can't Disney will not release it. You could Check England or Japan. Those are the only places that released it.
There is no such word in English. Perhaps this is a version of the  slang term "mancation" which was used as the title of a  movie in 2012, referring to a "man vacation" meaning a "guys-only"  road trip. (is there any other kind?)    Similar words include:   mastication: the process of...
It's spelled "idiot", one 'd'.
I pronounce pumpkin just as it is written - 'pump-kin'. I have  heard others pronounce pumpkin more like 'punkin'.
The common pronunciation (as in the 1974 Don McLean song) rhymes with "cradle".
The correct spelling is Mount Kosciuszko . For many years it was spelt "Kosciusko", the anglicised version, but in 1997, the extra 'z' was added to reflect the proper Polish spelling.
In English : KREHD-it (cred to rhyme with red, it as in hit) Both vowels are short vowel sounds. The CR is pronounced as KR and the accent is on the first syllable. *In French (e.g. Crédit Mobilier), the second syllable is a long E sound (KRED-ee).
so is that wrong?
S-A-L-A-T like salad except with a t for the d.
Janene, Janine, Jeannine, Janean, Jyneen, Gynean, Gyneene, Janeene
아니(informal) or 아니요(formal)
  You have it correct —> elongate
The adjective applied to the naturalistic religion Wicca is Wiccan.
It's spelled Bouvier des Flandres.
The name "Sontarans" is the correct spelling for the warlike fictional alien race from Doctor Who.
The correct spelling is "Basel", pronounced: Baa-zel "Basle" is a English spelling which is not used much, it is more usual to use the official German spelling. You may also see the French spelling, "Bâle", pronounced: Baal
The idiomatic term you are looking for is GIDDY WITH  ANTICIPATION. It means thrilled and excited while awaiting  something. The word "kiddie" or more rarely "kiddy" means a child,  and while a kid might have anticipation, it would not be plural.
That is a correct English statement "I live in Houston." (the asker may wish to have this translated into another language, but did not specify which)
The shortest are "bipod" "scrod" "unsod" and "synod" (where the Y  is a vowel).   Other words include: method, ramrod, tripod, unshod, isopod,  demigod, and decapod.
The term for people or things from Hawaii is "Hawaiian".
That is the correct spelling of "vertices", the plural of the term vertex.
The adjective delicious means very tasty (which is a  subjective view by the consumer of food). It can metaphorically  mean appealing or attractive in appearance, or having appeal (e.g.  a delicious story).
The crossword answer is "sanctity".
Guessed ?? hahaa
They are just odd words in the English language that don't apply to  some of the rules.
Naive is the anglicized form of the French word naïve. Both forms are correct in English usage. The accent tréma ¨ can be on an E, I, or U. It is used when two vowels are next to each other and both must be pronounced, e.g., naïve, Saül. Unlike the similar looking German umlaut, it does not...
Names are spelled the same way in Finnish.
The word "knowledge" applies to information or data.
Staring is correct, assuming you mean that someone stares at you.
The correct English spelling is spaghetti .
That is the correct spelling of depend (count on, or contingent). (The near-homophone is deepened, made deeper)
"Supercalifragilisticexpialidocius"
 Mack- ah-ROON. (I've heard other pronunciations, but  that's the one I'm most familiar with.)
The numbers 1, 2, and 3 are spelled one, two, and three. Note that  there are two other words that sound like "two": to and too.
The correct spelling is "diorama" (a model exhibit or simulation).
That is the correct spelling of the US state, Wisconsin.
That is the correct spelling of leukemia (cancer of the blood or bone marrow).
The animal gorilla is spelled gorila. The warfare is guerrilla.
The slang term is spelled downtrailed.
The English verb "allot" (meaning to allocate) is "attribuer" inFrench. The phrase "a lot" (meaning many or much) is "beaucoup."
B-rei-sheet. Sh-mot. Va-yik-rah. Bah-mid-bar. D-var-eem. Very shortpauses at the hyphens.
Yes, the O in whose is a long vowel.
It looks like you are asking about the saguaro cactus. There is no  type of cactus with a name that is any closer to "saroya".
The word sought may be the surname Montgomery (also a city, the  capital of Alabama).
The famous Connecticut city is Trumbull , named for George Washington's advisor and Connecticut governor Jonathan Trumbull (1710-1785). It was divided from Stratford in 1797.
HELLO : a greeting, possibly derived from the older "hullo" (a recognition greeting in "Oliver Twist"), and from "hallo" a form of shouted recognition.  
Trumbull, CT is a city north of Bridgeport in SW  Connecticut.
    Almost. The correct spelling is Hawaiian.However, the language there has one punctuation mark not used in English- called the Okina, it looks like an apostrophe, is a "glottal stop"- and shortens the sound of the letter before it.  Used with paired or tripled vowels, when...
  La Roan din a (a as in ape) Emphasis on the "Roan"
Angielsku (pronunciation: Ang-gel-skoo)
If you mean where the nuns stay, "convent". If you mean something that is easy, "convenient".
The proper noun Lekié is a location in Cameroon, Africa. The adjective meaning having leaks is "leaky" (also a famous surname Leakey).
That is the correct spelling of "humble" (modest, or self-effacing).
The English word "sister" has a unique spelling in Arabic. Arabicis a language heavy in consonant sounds and the spelling for thisword is no exception. It is "okht" (أخت).
Two thousand eight, or two thousand and eight.
it is from Mary Poppins and it means fantastic! But to me, it's like a tongue twister.
bao bei Which is like 'baby' as in 'honey"宝贝bao bao which is like baby as in a very young child.宝宝
prefix = be; base word = stow; suffix = ed
It depends on what context if it is   October's which is possessive as if October is owning something. if  it is like "Many Octobers" then you would not need an apostrophe.
The correct spelling is "cliche" (trite, from the French cliché).
  Because you touch yourself at night.
erm.. just like u typed it
The closest in English is actually like ale. So Ehlinger is actually aleinger. Over the years, some German descendants in the U.S. have given up and pronounce it like it appears in English - either el or eel. Karl Daniel Ehl