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US Banknotes

Parent Category: Coins and Paper Money
US banknotes refer to dollar bills or the legal tender currency in the United States. Printed in the US Treasury, its base denominations include $1, $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100.
AnswerThe highest snooker break possible without the benefit of an opponent's foul is 147 (15 reds, 15 blacks and then the six colours). This is known as a maximum break. It is also regularly known as simply a 'One-Four-Seven'.The highest snooker break possible with the benefit of an opponent's foul...
There were several types of silver certificates printed in that series. Please post a new, separate question with the bill's denomination, date, and whether there's a small letter next to the date. Also, check the color of the seal and serial numbers. if it has a green seal as opposed to a blue or...
Answer . You could probably take the $20 dollar (note - two "L"s) bills to a bank and turn them in for more modern bills. They're not worth more than face value if they're in worn condition. However, the older notes should be evaluated by a dealer because they are almost certainly worth more...
Please look at the caption right below the picture. You'll find that it says "Hamilton", not "Trumbull", because the person on the US $10 bill is Alexander Hamilton, the first Secretary of the Treasury. John Trumbull was an artist. An interpretation of his painting, The Signing of the Declaration...
If you're referring to the 50 cent note, issued in the 1860s and '70s, then the portrait varies by issue. The 1st issue features President George Washington. The 3rd issue shows Treasury Secretary F.E. Spinner (there was no 2nd series 50 cent note). Issue 4 has three versions, with President Abraham...
It's one of many security features added to the new bills to help prevent copying them on a printer or scanner.
The series letter alone isn't enough to provide an estimated value.  Please post a new, separate question with the bill's date.
It depends on their dates. For bills dated 1935 or 1957, unless they are crisp uncirculated, or have a relatively rare Series and signature combination, they are worth saving only as curiosities or using as spending money, especially the Series 1957, 1957A and 1957B issues (printed 1957-61, 1961-62...
Of course not! It is worth $5 unless it is in un-circulated condition, in which case a collector might give you a bit more.
Please see the link below. Search for "cotton"
The US didn't print any $10 bills dated 1912. You may have a privately-issued note; if so please post a new question with more details including the issuing bank and a description of the images on the bill.
The US didn't print any $10 bills dated 1925. Please check again and post a new question.
The US didn't print any $1 bills dated 1976. Please check again and post a new question.
Very often not. Bills are printed with the same series date until the Treasury decides that a new series should start. Series dates on US bills are a major source of confusion because there are no consistent rules for their application. A series date normally combines the first year a particular...
== Answer ==   There isn't one. Due to the inks used and the engraving of the printing plate one of the delegates in the back of the picture got more ink than was ideal. this has caused some people to think that he is Black or Indian but he wasn't. That guy, whose name I do not remember now, was...
That honor would probably go to the 1890 series of $2 Treasury  Notes. In crisp, uncirculated condition these could bring $4500 to  $5000 at auction.    Very few 20th-century $2 bills are valuable. The only issues that  break into the 4-figure range are 1918 National Currency Notes and ...
Please check your bill again and post a new, separate question. The  federal government did not issue any 1903 $20 bills. However many  private banks issued currency at that time, so if your bill is from  a bank please include that information in the new question.
It's a novelty item and not a genuine bill.     The US didn't print any banknotes dated 1932  The highest-denomination silver certificate was $1000  The highest-denomination bill of any kind was $100,000 and  these weren't used in general circulation.  
To clarify things, the bill wasn't minted and it's not from San  Francisco. The Mint makes coins. In 1914 all bills were  printed in Washington DC. San Francisco is the location of  the Federal Reserve District that distributed the bill.    There's more information at the Related Question.
  The last silver certificates were printed with the date 1957. No U.S. $1 bills are dated 1970. Please check again and post a new question. Include the letter, if any, next to the date. Don't include the serial number because it doesn't help to ID a bill.
The US didn't print any bills dated 1958. Please check again and post a new question.
No. All you'll get is a pile of ashes that used to be a $1 bill. If you think about it for, oh, a second or two, if such a bizarre story were actually true, wouldn't people all over the country be doing it, and in any case how could anyone outside of Harry Potter create magic money?
The last US $100 silver certificates were dated 1891, and no $100 bills were printed in 1932. Please check your bill again; it may be a fantasy printing, a novelty item, or a privately-issued bill.
Please check your bill again and post a new, separate question. The  US didn't print any bills dated 1964 and the last $10 silver  certificates were dated 1953.
"D" is the highest series letter for both 1934-dated series of $10  bills.    If your bill is a Federal Reserve Note, you may be referring to the  Federal Reserve District letter. The series letter, if any, on US  bills is next to the date.    Please check again and post a new, separate...
As of 05/2014 approximate prices are:    Circulated: $20 to $60 depending on the bill's condition   Uncirculated: $250    The seal color is actually yellow; the bill should have North  Africa printed in large letters on both sides. Despite the 1934  date these bills were printed for...
Thomas Jefferson
  == Answer ==   There were no U.S. $5 notes printed with that date.  Could you please check again? 
It may be authentic but it's not from 1776. Please turn the bill over and look at the printing date on the front. You'll see that the bill was printed in 1976. They were issued to mark the country's Bicentennial. The image on the back of the bill is taken from Trumbull's famous painting, The...
Internet rumors to the contrary, there were never any plans to NOT  print $2 bills.    The Treasury orders new ones as demand warrants. As of this  writing, the most recent printings have been made with the series  dates 2009 and 2013.
Any 1 million US Dollar note is worthless other than as a curiosity. The largest denomination is circulation is $100. The largest ever circulated is $100,000.
  Copy the following link into your browser bar: http://www.uscurrencyauctions.com/$10notes.htm
Please look again and post a new question. The last $1 silver certificates were dated 1957 and have a blue seal on the front instead of a green Federal Reserve seal.
They're uncommon in circulation because lower denominations of US  currency wear out in a few years; banks hold back worn bills and  return them to the Treasury for replacement. However so many of  these bills were printed that collectors and dealers have pretty  much as many as they want or...
A modern green-seal two dollar bill has a value of $2.00. Just ask for them at your local bank.
There's no bill specifically called a "horse" bill, and there were  no 1926-dated US bills. Please check again and post a new, separate  question.    Confusion may be because pre-1928 US bills were sometimes referred  to as horse blanket bills due to their large size.
They weren't "minted" anywhere, because the Mint only makes coins. The Bureau of Engraving and Printing prints all US paper currency. It's easy to tell where modern bills were printed. Up till 1990 there was only one printing facility, located in Washington DC, so your bill was printed there. By...
Unlike coins, the dates on US bills don't refer to the year in which the bill was printed. Instead it refers to a particular issue of bills having similar characteristics, called a "series". To make things more confusing, the definition of what constitutes a series has changed over the years. At...
If your bill has a yellow seal it should have the words SILVER  CERTIFICATE across the top and a small "A" next to the date. Values  as of 03/2015 are:    Circulated: $20 to $60 depending on wear  Uncirculated: $250     Yellow-seal bills were specially printed during WWII to pay...
  == Answer ==   Not sure just what you have, but it sounds like a souvenier piece that would have been sold at the shrine and not a silver dollar. It is possible that the reverse of a real silver dollar was filed off and the Indian portrait was added by some private company. It would not...
The gold seal indicates your bill was actually printed during WWII  despite its 1934 date. As of 05/2015 approximate retail prices are:    Circulated: $20 to $60 depending on the bill's condition  Uncirculated: $250    They were printed to pay troops serving in North Africa. The ...
They can be worth anywhere from $5.00 to around $60.00 depending on  their condition and printer.
Please post a new, separate question with the bill's date and what letter, if any, is next to the date. As you can see from the bills in your wallet, all US bills have serial numbers. They're counters and a security feature but rarely affect a bill's value. Some collectors will pay extra for...
A star at the end of a number means that at one point in time, there was a dollar bill with the same number on it. Because of resons unknown, the government burned the dollar bill, and made another dollar with the same number, adding the star.   Correction Here is the statement from the US Bureau...
The US never printed a $1 million bill. Your note is a well-known  novelty item that sells for a few dollars in gift shops and similar  stores.
On bills dated 1928 to 1966 red seals and serial numbers indicate  that the bill is a United States Note, a form of currency that was  issued directly by the Federal Government instead of through the  Federal Reserve System.    Most US Notes were either $2 or $5 bills; in 1966 they were also...
Red ink was never used in printing 1976 $2 bills because they were  issued as Federal Reserve Notes at a time when the standard colors  were black, green, and white.    It's possible your bill picked up additional colors from some  external source like a bank wrapper, a security pen, etc.  ...
Yes you can use any form of us currency with the exception of the  $100,000 bill which was just used for Federal Reserve transfers in  the 1930s. However, high denomination bills are not issued any  longer so they are rare. You can use them to make purchases, pay  debts, etc. but you'd be fool...
Currently, the one hundred dollar bill is the highest denomination  printed.    At one time the US also issued $500, $1000, $5000, and $10,000  bills for general circulation, and printed special $100,000 bills  for use by Federal Reserve banks. Printing was discontinued in  1945. In 1969...
Please check your bill again and post a new, separate question with  more information that might help to identify it. There weren't any  federally-issued $100 bills dated 1868 but at that time many  private banks printed their own bills under federal charter. If  your bill has the name of a...
The US issued $1 bills and $1 coins with that date. Please see the  Related Questions for more information.
They are still in production today. You can obtain one from your  local bank.    Source:   www ustreas gov/education/faq/currency/denominations.shtml
There is no such thing as a "Morgan $2 bill". George T. Morgan  designed coins, not bills. Most red seal $2 bills are worth only a  few dollars above face value, although they can retail for higher  prices if in uncirculated condtion. Given that situation,  sequential serial numbers add little...
In most cases a bill's date and series letter, if any (next to the  date) are more important than the bank that distributed it. Please  check your bill again and post a new, separate question with those  two pieces of information.    To clarify things, the bill wasn't printed in Chicago and...
"BEP" stands for "Bureau of Engraving and Printing", the agency  that prints all US currency.
It's not clear what's meant by "offset". If the word describes a  bill whose image isn't correctly aligned, its value depends on the  amount of misalignment. If the entire image is visible and all  that's off-center is the border, the bill has no extra value. But  if part of another bill is...
  About $1.25 to $1.50. Many of these bills were saved because they were the last $1 silver certificates printed, so they're quite common among collectors.    
The US printed so-called "fractional" currency during and after the  Civil War in an effort to alleviate a shortage of coins caused by a  number of factors related to wartime disruption. The smallest  fractional note was worth three cents, and was issued from 1864 to  1869.    Other...
Only those printed in 1990 and later. Earlier bills had very few anti-counterfeiting measures.
Yes, you can still get 2 dollar bills. Banks should have them as well as coin dealers. You can also get them online.
The US never printed any bills dated 1955. Please check your bill  again and post a new, separate question.
Bills don't have mint marks. The U.S. Mint only makes coins.    Bills are printed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, which  has only 2 facilities. The main plant in Washington DC doesn't put  any special designation on its bills. The auxiliary facility in  Fort Worth marks its bills...
  Retail values range from $45 if worn to over $100 if only slight wear is visible.
  These are common in collections and sell for face value only.
As of 03/2015 approximate prices are: Circulated: $2.25 to $5 for a bill in average condition Uncirculated: $12 The red seal indicates that it's a United States Note, a form of currency issued until the late 1960s. All 1953 US $2 bills were printed as US Notes. Serial Numbers A bill's serial...
Please check again and post a new question. No $2 bills are dated  1929.    If your bill's date is 1928, there's more information at the  question "What is the value of a 1928 [letter] US 2 dollar bill?"
Ulysses S. Grant's portrait was first used on a $50 bill for the  1913 series of $50 Gold Certificates. It was added to $50 Federal  Reserve Notes the next year and has been retained ever since.    His picture replaced that of William H. Seward, Lincoln's Secretary  of State.
All US 1963 dollar notes are worth only their face value unless in mint uncirculated condition. The approximate dealer value for UNC notes; $1 : $4-5 $5 : $15-20 $10 : $35-50 $20 : $60-75 $50 : $150 $100 : $275 ----- These are common among collectors, so if it's worn, it's worth face value...
Face value only. More information is below.    "FD471774" is part of the bill's serial number. The term series  refers to the bill's date. In any case serial numbers are counters  and a security feature but rarely help to ID or value a bill.    Normally the series date would be the...
Please check your bill again and post a new, separate question.  There are no US bills dated 1943.
More information is needed to identify your bill. The motto wasn't  added to $10 bills until 1963, 101 years after the first tens were  printed.    Please post a new, separate question with your bill's seal color,  its date, and what letter if any is next to the date.
Please check the banner across the top of your bill. It's a United  States Note rather than a certificate. Certificates were printed in  two types, gold and silver, and could be redeemed for an amount of  precious metal equal to their denomination. The last $2  certificates were silver...
The U.S. did not print any $1 bills with that date. In fact, NO U.S. bills have that date.
The U.S. didn't print any $2 bills dated 1964, and JFK's picture has never appeared on any bills, just half dollars. What you have is almost certainly a privately-printed item made as a keepsake or memento following his assassination. Today, it's unlikely to have much collector value because it's...
Please check your bill again and post a new, separate question.   The US didn't print any 1926-dated bills. The closest date would be  1928.
The back of a $5 bill has a picture of the Lincoln Memorial which has the names of all 48 states that existed at the time it was built, so of course the image on the $5 bill will show that as well. Of those, either 26 or 27 states are shown, depending on what age it has and what image was used....
They're novelty items made by putting a sticker on a genuine $2  bill. They sell for several dollars in gift shops but are really  only worth face value.
Due to inflation the need for $1 bills has increased to the point where they make up 45% of all bills in circulation. Demand for $2 notes is extremely low but relatively steady; they account for about 1% of all bills.
As of 06/2011, in average condition it might retail for about $55. Most dealers will only pay face value though because 1977 isn't a rare date for $50 bills. If you have a nice uncirculated one without any folds or tears, it could go for as much as $65.   
Please post a new question with enough details to ID the bill. Include the date, how worn it is, and whether there is a small letter right next to the date.
Please check your bill again and post a new, separate question. The  only seal colors used on 1934 A $5 bills were blue, green, yellow,  and brown. The serial numbers will be the same color.
In circulated condition it's worth $5. Series D bills are only  worth more than their face value before 1928.    A nice uncirculated one might bring $10 at auction.    Why doesn't the bill have "In God We Trust"?   That motto wasn't added to paper money until the late 1950s and  early...
Despite the series date, 1950 $5s are not particularly valuable.  Auction values as of 12/2009:    If there is a small letter A, B, etc. after the date, $5 to $8  depending on how worn it is.    If there is no letter, $7 to $12 retail.     Why doesn't the bill have "In God We...
High-denomination bills have never been recalled and are technically still legal tender but they haven't been in over 60 years and haven't been available from banks for over 40, so they're effectively no longer in use.
  Depending on condition, $30 to $60. The rest of serial number is not really a determinant of the bill's value. The star indicates that it's a replacement bill for one with the same number that was damaged during printing.
Please check again and post a new question. There were no federally-issued silver certificates with that date. If you have a bill issued by a private bank, please include details about the bank name and images on the bill.
there are only 10 in the world, so i guess none
In perfect uncirculated condition it is worth $6. In normal used condition is is worth exactly $2.
Please check again and post a new question. It can't have a blue seal (rather than "stamp") and it can't be from 1943. The last blue-seal $100 bills were dated 1918, and in any case no US bills of any denomination are dated 1943.
Despite its 1934 series date the "D" series letter indicates your  bill was printed in the late 1940s. As of 03/2015 approximate  prices are:    Circulated: $12 to $20 depending on the bill's condition   Uncirculated: $35    Serial Numbers   A bill's serial number is a counter and...
1976 US $2 bills were printed in large numbers for the  Bicentennial. In average condition they're only worth face value.  Uncirculated ones might be worth $3 to $5.
As of 04/2015 approximate prices, regardless of series letter, are:    Circulated: $65 to $95 depending on the bill's condition  Uncirculated: $350     FAQs:    "In God We Trust"   That motto was adopted in 1955 and was added to bills starting in  the late 1950s and early 1960s...
The two phrases are    Novus Ordo Seclorum - "[A] New Order of the Ages"  Annuit Cœptis - "[Providence] has approved of (our)  undertakings"     The image of the pyramid and eye are taken from the reverse side of  the Great Seal of the United States. The pyramid has 13 rows of ...
Please check that date again; perhaps you're referring to  1923. The first $1 silver certificates were issued in  1886 and there were no Federally-printed $1 bills before 1861.