Custody
Children and the Law
Emancipation and Ages for Moving Out

At what age can the child decide for him-herself not to visit their father who has joint custody by Arkansas laws?

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2005-11-25 14:30:12
2005-11-25 14:30:12

When they reach the age of majority which is 18, or when a court rules otherwise. A minor child nor a custodial parent are not allowed to arbitrarily stop or change visitation schedules unless the other custodial parent agrees or unless there is "just cause' such as the child being ill. To change a visitation order the parent who believes there is a problem must file a motion of modification in the proper court of jurisdiction. Any parent who does not obey a court ordered custody agreement can be cited for contempt and experience other legal difficulties.

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A father can gain custody by going back to court probably with an attorney. The judge will have to decide that the switch is in the best interest of the child.



In Arkansas custody is assigned to an unmarried mother unless there is reason to give custody to another person. A father may get custody if he is determined to be a fit parent and he is able to show the court that it's in the child's best interest to remove the child from the mother's custody and award custody to him. He would need to show some degree of unfitness on the mother's part that would compel the court to make the change.You can read more about child custody in Arkansas at the related link. See also related question link.In Arkansas custody is assigned to an unmarried mother unless there is reason to give custody to another person. A father may get custody if he is determined to be a fit parent and he is able to show the court that it's in the child's best interest to remove the child from the mother's custody and award custody to him. He would need to show some degree of unfitness on the mother's part that would compel the court to make the change.You can read more about child custody in Arkansas at the related link. See also related question link.In Arkansas custody is assigned to an unmarried mother unless there is reason to give custody to another person. A father may get custody if he is determined to be a fit parent and he is able to show the court that it's in the child's best interest to remove the child from the mother's custody and award custody to him. He would need to show some degree of unfitness on the mother's part that would compel the court to make the change.You can read more about child custody in Arkansas at the related link. See also related question link.In Arkansas custody is assigned to an unmarried mother unless there is reason to give custody to another person. A father may get custody if he is determined to be a fit parent and he is able to show the court that it's in the child's best interest to remove the child from the mother's custody and award custody to him. He would need to show some degree of unfitness on the mother's part that would compel the court to make the change.You can read more about child custody in Arkansas at the related link. See also related question link.


The court will decide what's best for the child according to the laws of the jurisdiction and the facts of the situation. The courts does not allow a child to make such decisions.


No, both parents have equal rights to the child. If the child is currently living with the father, then he has established temporary custody. A court will need to decide upon a formal custody and child support agreement.


Each situation is different and there is no set answer. The judge will decide. If the biological father is a fit parent then he will most likely be awarded custody. The grandmother would most likely have visitation rights. The judge will look at the situation and decide what is best for the welfare of the child.


The father must petition the court for temporary custody.The father must petition the court for temporary custody.The father must petition the court for temporary custody.The father must petition the court for temporary custody.


You have to be 18. As long as you are a minor your parents decide.


The father would be the favored person to get legal custody if the mother had custody and died unless he was found to be unfit to have custody.


No. If your father has custody you cannot make that decision until you reach eighteen unless your father consents to a change in the custody order.No. If your father has custody you cannot make that decision until you reach eighteen unless your father consents to a change in the custody order.No. If your father has custody you cannot make that decision until you reach eighteen unless your father consents to a change in the custody order.No. If your father has custody you cannot make that decision until you reach eighteen unless your father consents to a change in the custody order.


No, provided you are not removing the child from the jurisdiction of the court, and there are no limitation in the custody order, such as a morality clause.


If the father has legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has joint legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has sole legal custody, yes.If the father has legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has joint legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has sole legal custody, yes.If the father has legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has joint legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has sole legal custody, yes.If the father has legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has joint legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has sole legal custody, yes.


He doesn't. He goes through the appropriate court and will gain primary residential custody if it is in the best interest of the child. You do not "take" anything.


That's up to the court to decide. Unless there is a conviction the court is likely to issue a visitation order unless the mother can provide evidence the father is unfit and the child would be endangered in his custody.That's up to the court to decide. Unless there is a conviction the court is likely to issue a visitation order unless the mother can provide evidence the father is unfit and the child would be endangered in his custody.That's up to the court to decide. Unless there is a conviction the court is likely to issue a visitation order unless the mother can provide evidence the father is unfit and the child would be endangered in his custody.That's up to the court to decide. Unless there is a conviction the court is likely to issue a visitation order unless the mother can provide evidence the father is unfit and the child would be endangered in his custody.


Joint custody is between two parents, which are usually a mother and a father.


It is highly unlikely that a grandmother would be given custody just because the father lives out of state. If there are other factors such as abuse by the father then, possibly, but not certainly. The court would look at the case carefully and decide what is best for the child



The grandparents have no right to the child, only the parents can decide about adoption. If she does not want custody the father can get it.


That is up to a court to decide. The father cannot take that action on his own. He need to petition for full custody. However, if the child has been in a stable and loving home, and well cared for, the court is not likely to terminate the mother's custody at this terrible time unless it can be proven the child is endangered or being neglected.That is up to a court to decide. The father cannot take that action on his own. He need to petition for full custody. However, if the child has been in a stable and loving home, and well cared for, the court is not likely to terminate the mother's custody at this terrible time unless it can be proven the child is endangered or being neglected.That is up to a court to decide. The father cannot take that action on his own. He need to petition for full custody. However, if the child has been in a stable and loving home, and well cared for, the court is not likely to terminate the mother's custody at this terrible time unless it can be proven the child is endangered or being neglected.That is up to a court to decide. The father cannot take that action on his own. He need to petition for full custody. However, if the child has been in a stable and loving home, and well cared for, the court is not likely to terminate the mother's custody at this terrible time unless it can be proven the child is endangered or being neglected.



No, he can't. And the father could be jailed for contempt of court if he allowed it to happen.


No, the mother is no more entitled to custody than the father. If the father currently has temporary or implied custody, then a custody order must first be established before you can get partial custody or visitation rights. For example, if you moved out and left the child in the care of the father, you forfeited your custody rights until an official custody order has been established.



This is a problematic area and cannot be clearly answered in that Juries can be used in Texas to decide custody. It's the only states that does.


if there is no mother, any relative can apply for custody. The court will decide who will get the child or the child ends up in foster care. A minor child is not allowed to choose who to live with.



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