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Answered 2014-04-14 07:34:11

Depends on why the parent is non-custodial. If he is unfit they can not. The court usually listen to a teen that old but there are no guarantees they will decide on his favor.

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180 days per year, per parent on a 2 year average.


Well if the noncustodial parent wishes to take the kid the judge might give the parent custody if there is not a bad reason the parent did not get custody in the first place hope I helped you




It depends on why the living parent didn't have custody. If the custodial parent has passed away the noncustodial parent has to apply for custody in court.


It depends on whether or not the custodial parent solicited a court order which would prohibit out of state visitation. If there is no legal prohibition, the 17 year old is free to visit the noncustodial parent out of state. It depends on whether or not the custodial parent solicited a court order which would prohibit out of state visitation. If there is no legal prohibition, the 17 year old is free to visit the noncustodial parent out of state.


Yes, a twelve year old can move in with the other parent.


A 13 year old can go before a judge and tell them that they do not want to visit their non custodial parent anymore. A 13 year old is old enough to know if they want to continue a relationship with a parent.


Revocation of release of claim to an exemption.The noncustodial parent is NOT the ONE that has to notify the custodial parent.The CUSTODIAL parent has to do this.For 2009, new rules allow the custodial parent to revoke a release of claim to exemption that the custodial parent previously released to the noncustodial parent on Form 8332 or a similar statement. If the custodial parent provides, or makes reasonable efforts to provide, the noncustodial parent with written notice of the revocation in 2009, the revocation can be effective no earlier than 2010. The custodial parent can use Part III of Form 8332 for this purpose and must attach a copy of the revocation to his or her return for each tax year he or she claims the child as a dependent as a result of the revocation.Post-1984 decree or agreement. If the divorce decree or separation agreement went into effect after 1984 and before 2009, the noncustodial parent can still attach certain pages from the decree or agreement instead of Form 8332 provided that these pages are substantially similar to Form 8332. For any decree or agreement executed after 2008, the noncustodial parent must attach Form 8332 or a similar statement signed by the custodial parent and whose only purpose is to release a claim to exemption.Go to the IRS gov web site and use the search box for Publication 504 Divorced or Separated Individuals go to chapter 2You can click on the below related link


In most states an 18 year old is no longer a minor and can live where they wish.


No. And it's the parents job to make sure the court order is followed.


Yes, but that is not the end of the story.The divorce decree can specify who gets to claim the dependent exemption for the child for income tax purposes. However, there is a specific attachment the noncustodial parent must file with his or her tax return each year to claim the exemption.In general, the IRS allows the custodial parent to claim the dependency exemption. The custodial parent is the parent with whom the child lived for the greater part of the year. The other parent is the noncustodial parent. If the parents divorced or separated during the year and the child lived with both parents before the separation, the custodial parent is the one with whom the child lived for the greater part of the rest of the year.The rules as to when the noncustodial parent can claim the exemption changed effective for tax years beginning after July 2, 2008 (the 2009 calendar year for most taxpayers.)POST-2008 DECREE OR AGREEMENTFor divorce decrees that went into effect after 2008, the custodial parent must sign Form 8332, Release/Revocation of Release of Claim to Exemption for Child by Custodial Parent(or a similar form,) and give the signed form to the noncustodial parent to release the exemption. The noncustodial parent must attach that form to his or her tax return to claim the exemption that year.The noncustodial parent can no longer attach certain pages from a divorce decree or separation agreement instead of Form 8332 if the decree or agreement was executed after 2008.The custodial parent can specify on Form 8332 the release applies to only the current tax year or all future tax years. To help ensure future support, you may not want to release your claim to the exemption for the child for future years.POST-1984 / PRE-2009 DECREE OR AGREEMENTIf the divorce decree or separation agreement went into effect after 1984 and before 2009, the noncustodial parent can still attach certain pages from the decree or agreement instead of Form 8332.However, the custodial parent who gave up the exemption via the divorce decree does not appear to be without recourse. See "To revoke a prior release of exemption" below.PRE-1985 DECREE OR AGREEMENTThe rules are again slightly different if the divorce decree or separation agreement went into effect before 1985. See the instructions for Form 8332 if that applies to your situation.TO REVOKE A PRIOR RELEASE OF EXEMPTIONForm 8332 can also be used to revoke a prior release of exemption. The revocation is effective no earlier than the tax year beginning in the calendar year following the calendar year in which the custodial parent provides, or makes reasonable efforts to provide, the noncustodial parent with written notice of the revocation.For example, if the custodial parent provides notice of revocation to the noncustodial parent in 2009, the earliest tax year the revocation can be effective is the tax year beginning in 2010. You can use Part III of Form 8332 for this purpose.You must attach a copy of the revocation to your return for each tax year you claim the child as a dependent as a result of the revocation. You must also keep for your records a copy of the revocation and evidence of delivery of the notice to the noncustodial parent, or of reasonable efforts to provide actual notice.




If a 16 year old in Canada has consent or doesn't have consent from one parent can she move out on her own?"


If that is what the parent wants, they can do so. The parent can decide where the minor lives.


Anytime. If both parents have an income then the courts will more than likely order that each parent will claim the child(ren) on their taxes every other year.


Being 18 makes you an adult and with that privilege gives you the right to make your own adult decisions you can move in with who you want. And no one not even the custodial parent can keep you from making your own mind up. You are free to make your own decisions. As far as Child support in most states that is discontinued once the child reaches the age of 18 unless there are back child support due by the noncustodial parent. Once you reach a certain age custody is no longer an issue the child can make his or hers choice on which parent they chose to live with.


Child support in Ohio usually continues until the child is 18, and up to the age of 21 if the child is in school. Whether or not you have to pay child support if the child is living with the noncustodial parent depends on the support order that it is in place Typically you can expect that you will have to expect to pay support.


Usually the custodial parent when all of the rules are met by the custodial parent and the qualifying child to be claimed as a QC dependent.Go to the IRS gov web site and use the search box for Publication 17 go to chapter 3Qualifying ChildResidency Test Rule 3Children of divorced or separated parents or parents who live apart. In most cases, because of the residency test, a child of divorced or separated parents is the qualifying child of the custodial parent. However, the child will be treated as the qualifying child of the noncustodial parent if all four of the following statements are true.Custodial parent and noncustodial parent, The custodial parent is the parent with whom the child lived for the greater number of nights during the year. The other parent is the noncustodial parent.Equal number of nights, If the child lived with each parent for an equal number of nights during the year, the custodial parent is the parent with the higher adjusted gross income.You can click on the below related link for more information and examples.


It is not the custody agreement that determines who is qualified to claim the children as a qualified child dependents on a income tax return.Go to the IRS gov web site and use the search box for Publication 17 go to chapter 3Qualifying ChildResidency Test Rule 3Children of divorced or separated parents or parents who live apart. In most cases, because of the residency test, a child of divorced or separated parents is the qualifying child of the custodial parent. However, the child will be treated as the qualifying child of the noncustodial parent if all four of the following statements are true.Custodial parent and noncustodial parent. The custodial parent is the parent with whom the child lived for the greater number of nights during the year. The other parent is the noncustodial parent.Equal number of nights. If the child lived with each parent for an equal number of nights during the year, the custodial parent is the parent with the higher adjusted gross income.You can click on the below related link for more information and examples.




No, a 17 year old can not move out with a 19 year old in Illinois without parent approval. If the 17 year old has approval, they can move out.


Yes, if he has the child 51% of the time. Regardless of any custody agreement, or court order the IRS has it's own definition of who the custodial parent is. Section 152(e)(4) defines custodial parent as the parent having custody for the greater portion of the calendar year and noncustodial parent as the parent who is not the custodial parent.



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