Children and the Law
Emancipation and Ages for Moving Out
Age of Consent & Underage Relationships

Can a minor be emancipated from one parent or does it have to be from both?

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2005-11-19 03:34:43
2005-11-19 03:34:43

The premise of emancipation is that the minor does not need adult intervention or assistance to conduct their affairs. Therefore it would not be possible to receive a decree of emancipation from only one parent. The minor must be able to provide proof of an acceptable level of income (their own, not money from a family member or friend); that will enable them to support themselves. They must have an established residence, present proof of being able to pay for utilities, food, clothing, medical care, education if applicable, transportation and so on and so on.

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you need to be 14 to be emancipated. yes it is possible, but you need to make that clear when you state your case, and to the parent you want to 'keep'. 16 to be emancipated from both.

Neither parent can kick a minor out of the house. As a parent both are responsible for the minor child until they reach 18.

A pregnant minor or one who is already a parent is not emancipated apart from regarding their health or the child. And adopted children are legally like the biological ones to the adoptive parent. This means you are not emancipated until you are 18 and can only then decide where to go or move.

No, you cannot get emancipated from just one parent. It sounds like maybe what you're wanting to do is live with the non-custodial parent? If so, then that's a custody issue, not an emancipation issue. An emancipation decree conferred upon a minor indicates that the minor is deemed a legal adult and does not require the intervention of other adults (including a parent) in financial or personal matters.

If the parent you are livine with has legal custody the answer is no. Otherwise, the laws regarding the emancipation of a minor vary from state to state and there are strict requirements. You need to check the laws in your state.

Having a baby does not make one 18 years old. You have to be an adult to be emancipated.

Your mother does not have to do anything. And having a child does not mean one is emancipated automatically.

Indiana does not have established grounds nor procedures for the emancipation of minors. A minor is considered emancipated if they marry or enlist in the military both of which require the consent of the parent(s) or legal guardian. One exception with limitations is to allow a pregnant minor to be eligible for public benefits to receive health care. This does not mean the minor female would be allowed to live independently of parents or adult supervision.

If you're in the US, emancipation is always from both parents. It is not possible to be emancipated from just one. Of course, emancipation is rarely granted, because most minors don't even come close to meeting the requirements for it.

You still have to stay with your parents until you are emancipated by the court so you wont need one. Once you are emancipated you can have one. If you have moved already with their consent you can have a roommate.

A minor cannot be emancipated from only one parent. The act of emancipation means the minor is given legal adult status to enable said person to handle their personal and financial affairs without the necessity of adult intervention. That is defined as the minor having gainful employment in which he or she earns enough income to pay for housing, food, transportation, medical care, educational expenses and so forth. The emancipated minor will not be eligible for public assistance except under very limited conditions. In addition the court reserves the right to rescind an emancipation decree at any time before the minor reaches the state's age of majority and to remand the minor into the custody of the state. Emancipation information for the minor's state of residence can be obtained from the office of the clerk of the probate court in the county in which the minor resides.

Being a parent does not make one an adult. Only age will make you an adult.

Yes, from one parent and the parent and minor has to request the abortion or she can not have one.

Since it requires both signatures, how would there be any trouble, as there would be no marriage.

There is no such status as medically emancipated. A minor female bearing a child has no bearing on her underage status. A minor becomes emancipated by: Being granted emancipation rights through the court of jurisdiction and marriage. It means you are the only one deciding regarding your health when you are pregnant. No one can tell you what to do regarding the pregnancy or the child when he/she is born. You are the only one who decides.

In the case of the marriage of a minor, both parents must attend in person and sign their consent if the parents are married. If the parents are not married only one parent has sole custody that parent must attend in person and sign their consent. In the case of joint legal custody both must consent.

A minor can only move with parental consent and if the court ha given custody to one parent that is the parent the minor have to stay with. A minor can not choose who to live with until he is 18.

I am not sure of the recent laws and I suppose it depends on the state, however, I was emancipated by one parent at the age of 16 (14 years ago, in the state of North Dakota). Good Luck!

Both your parents are your next-of-kin. However, if you are a minor and one parent has legal custody, that parent has the authority to make decisions regarding your medical treatment.

You need to ensure what state the person is in when getting the tattoo. If they are in Wisconsin, Wisconsin's laws apply. If they are in another state when obtaining it, then Wisconsin's laws would not apply even if the person has one parent in Wisconsin. Some states will allow just one parent or legal guardian to be present for someone who is a minor, while some states will not allow a minor to get one at all. Check the states laws where the person will be getting the tattoo. Most states, if not all, will consider "legal age" when a person is no longer a minor or can be emancipated.

no if you are over 18 you can not date a minor nor can you both be minors but one be 4 years younger for example if you are 17 you can't date someone 13

No. It is not possible for a minor to be emancipated from one parent while living with the other. Emancipation basically means that the minor has been found by a judge to be mature enough to live independently of adult supervision. One of the requirements for emancipation is that the minor must be gainfully employed and earn enough income to pay for housing, utilities, food, clothing, medical care, transportation, education (if applicable) and so forth.

get a lawer and go to court but you have to be 16 and up below 18

You need consent from both, this is what the law says;Art. 3992. Consent of parent or tutor.The petition of the minor shall be accompanied by a written consent to the emancipation and a specific declaration that the minor is fully capable of managing his own affairs, by the following:(1) The father and mother if both are alive, or the survivor if one is dead. If either parent is absent or unable to act, the consent of the other parent alone is necessary. If the parents are judicially separated or divorced, and the custody of the minor has been awarded by judgment to one of the parents, the consent of that parent alone is necessary. A surviving parent is not required to qualify as natural tutor in order to give such consent, nor is the appointment of a special tutor necessary.If the petition is filed on the ground of ill treatment, refusal to support, or corrupt examples, parental consent is unnecessary, but the parents or the surviving parent shall be cited to show cause why the minor should not be emancipated.


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