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2012-10-16 17:27:41
2012-10-16 17:27:41

Yes. He would have to petition the court for custody.

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She is committing adultery and involving her children. It is unlikely the court would support her actions while she is still married. The court may award custody to their father. She should file for divorce if she wants child support.


Married or not. If not married, No. If married, father is assumed by law to be the father of the baby.


mother has sole custody, father has child support obligation. see link


The mother. The father have to prove paternity in court and petition for custody, visitation and can then also pay child support.


The mother. The father have to prove paternity by a DNA test and can then get his parental rights and petition for custody, visitation and pay child support.


You have to prove paternity in court by a DNA test and you can then petition for custody, visitation and pay child support.


Depends on the circumstances. If you are a single father, without court orders, the mother still has sole custody and control. If married, you have possession, however if you file for child support, you have a presumption of custody.


If not married he has to prove paternity in court to get his parental rights. He can then petition for custody, visitation and pay child support. If married to the mother they have equal rights to the child.


The mother, if married, should file for divorce and request to be awarded sole legal custody of the children. She should also request a child support order.If the parties are not married the mother has sole custody. She should file for child support and an order for DNA testing as soon as possible. The father must help to support the children.In either case the father will be entitled to a visitation order. He can also request joint custody but the court is unlikely to award that unless the parents have a good relationship.The mother, if married, should file for divorce and request to be awarded sole legal custody of the children. She should also request a child support order.If the parties are not married the mother has sole custody. She should file for child support and an order for DNA testing as soon as possible. The father must help to support the children.In either case the father will be entitled to a visitation order. He can also request joint custody but the court is unlikely to award that unless the parents have a good relationship.The mother, if married, should file for divorce and request to be awarded sole legal custody of the children. She should also request a child support order.If the parties are not married the mother has sole custody. She should file for child support and an order for DNA testing as soon as possible. The father must help to support the children.In either case the father will be entitled to a visitation order. He can also request joint custody but the court is unlikely to award that unless the parents have a good relationship.The mother, if married, should file for divorce and request to be awarded sole legal custody of the children. She should also request a child support order.If the parties are not married the mother has sole custody. She should file for child support and an order for DNA testing as soon as possible. The father must help to support the children.In either case the father will be entitled to a visitation order. He can also request joint custody but the court is unlikely to award that unless the parents have a good relationship.


Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.Generally, A "presumed father" has no legal custody unless he is married to the mother at the time of the child's birth. If the parent's are both married to each other they each have custody.Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.Generally, A "presumed father" has no legal custody unless he is married to the mother at the time of the child's birth. If the parent's are both married to each other they each have custody.Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.Generally, A "presumed father" has no legal custody unless he is married to the mother at the time of the child's birth. If the parent's are both married to each other they each have custody.Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he can establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.Generally, A "presumed father" has no legal custody unless he is married to the mother at the time of the child's birth. If the parent's are both married to each other they each have custody.


Single mothers have sole custody by default. Married mother must address it with the court. Non-custodial mothers can still get a child support award from the father.


The parents of the child are liable for support - not their spouses.


The mother until the father has gone to court to gain his parental rights and can petition for custody and pay child support.


The mother. The father have to apply in court for visitation or custody after paternity have been established. Then he can also pay child support.


No. If you are not married the mother have custody automatically since birth. The only way for the father to get it is by proving paternity in court and he can then petition for custody, visitation and pay child support. Until then he can not stop her and the child form leaving. If you are married she can also leave with the child and so could you since you both have equal right to the child then.


If the father have visitation, shared custody or paying child support she will need his and the courts consent.


In Alabama custody and visitation have nothing to do with child support. Not sure about other states.


If married, when you divorce him and if single when the child is born. He will then have to prove paternity in court and can then petition for visitation, custody and also pay child support.


Yes, if the father is not given custody he will be obligated to keep paying support to whomever the court awards custody or guardianship of the children.


Generally, in the United States, an unmarried mother has sole custody of her child until the father has established his paternity in court. When he does establish his paternity he can request custody, visitations and a child support order can be entered.


No. If your mother has sole legal custody she can consent to your getting married.


If you are not married the custody automatically falls on the mother and the father have to go to court to get visitation or custody. If you are married you have equal rights.


The mother has legal custody from birth if never married. The father have to go to court to get his parental rights and prove paternity so he can seek visitation, custody and pay child support. The mother is in this case the one who decides what name the child will have since she is the guardian.If the custody is not with father, then after getting the custody , they may change the name.


The childs' father, married or not. Your relationship to the father is irrelevent. The father is the first on a long list of family members. Create a living will if that is not acceptable.


In general, yes, if they are not married. Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he must establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.



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