answersLogoWhite
Job Interviews
Labor and Employment Law
Income Garnishment
Tax Forms

Can you ask an employer not to give out certain information about your employment to someone who is verifying employment?

585960

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
2010-12-07 08:25:37
2010-12-07 08:25:37

You can ask them, but unless there is a written agreement between the two of you then the law pretty much dictates what they are allowed to disclose. These days, it isn't much because there have been so many lawsuits from employees who feel their reputations were damaged.

AnswerI only provide the information for the Human Resources department on my application and not the name of my supervisor. Despite the laws, there are too many non verbal ways the supervisor can affect the answers, so this avoids that situation altogether.

Also, if there was a co-worker who you feel respected your work, ask them if you can use them as a personal reference and put it in that section.

AnswerA prospective employer is likely to conduct an employment background check . The FCRA (Fair Credit Reporting Act) defines a background check as a consumer report. The report can vary from just checking a social security number to an in-depth investigation of education, work, criminal, credit, social and lifestyle history, including your job references. Any details that a previous employer may not give that have some sort of legal implication will come up in this background check. The employer does require the applicant's permission in writing to do the check.

Answer

The only information that an employer can legally give out when asked for verification is how long you have worked there, and how much you made, i.e $/hr or salary. However, this is dependent entirely upon the mannerisms of your employer, as most verifications are made by phone.

1

Related Questions

User Avatar

An employer cannot see an employment history that is not provided by you. If you do not wish for them to know about a certain job, then just do not list it.

User Avatar

A contract of employment is a document which describes the employer and employee agreement. The document contains the duties to be done over a certain duration and the amount of remuneration to be expected.

User Avatar

Short answer: It is possible. However, certain criteria must be met. From the Virginia Employment Commission: If you are separated for any reason other than lack of work, it will be necessary to gather facts from you and your employer concerning your separation. Your employer will be sent a questionnaire requesting information concerning your employment and separation. You will be called by a VEC deputy and be given an opportunity to present your information and review that of your employer. The deputy will make a determination regarding your qualification based on the separation information presented. You will be disqualified if the deputy determines that you quit your job without good cause, or were fired from your job for misconduct in connection with your work. You and your employer have the right to appeal the deputy's determination if either of you disagrees with the results." See the Related Link below for more information.

User Avatar

In at will employment states, yes. In these state, an employer can fire an employee who has tuna for lunch instead of ham. They need no reason to fire you. In all states, if you are employed in a position where you handle money, accounts, or are required to maintain a certain level of responsibility, then yes. The bankruptcy demonstrates for the employer that you have a certain level of irresponsibility in your life, and can terminate your employment, especially those employers who obtain a credit report on you prior to your initial higher.

User Avatar

EEO is a set of laws that governs and ensures equal employment for all that can work. An employer should include an EEO statement, safety instructions, disability accommodations, and policies on how to handle certain personnel matters.

User Avatar

In Ohio, an employer must keep employment applications on file for up to a year in certain situations. If a person is disabled or over 40, the application must be kept for 2 years.

User Avatar

When referring to employment benefits, vesting is the amount of time to ownership to the employer's contribution to his or her accrued benefits. In the case of a pension, an employer makes contributions to an employee's retirement plans over the course of his or her employment. Generally, the employee must complete a certain amount of time before he or she has rights to the employer contributions in the pension plan. Plan benefits are said to "vest" at the end of that time period. Example: An employee receives $1,000 a year in employer contributions to his/her pension plan, with 50% vesting after 2 years of employment and 100% vesting after 3 years of employment. [To keep it simple, assume 0% returns in the pension plan.] If the employee quits at the beginning of his/her third year of employment, he or she is entitled to $1,000 * 2 years of employer contributions * 50% = $1,000 in the pension plan. If the employee quits at beginning of his/her fourth year of employment, at retirement, he or she is entitled to $1,000 * 3 years of employer contributions * 100% = $3,000 in the pension plan.

User Avatar

An employer can be vicariously liable for the torts committed by an employee while they are in the scope of their employment in certain situations. An employer will not normally be held vicariously liable for the torts of an independent contractor because of a lack of supervisory control.

User Avatar

You do have to cooperate in filing a claim by providing certain basic information.

User Avatar

Temporary employment means that an employer will agree to hire someone, but only for a certain period of time. At the end of that period, it is possible that the employer might want to hire the person for a longer period of time. This does not happen with all temporary jobs, however. At the beginning of the job, it is important to be clear on how long the employment will last and whether or not it could lead to a permanent hire. The person who is your job supervisor will be able to answer this for you, either at the interview or after you're hired.

User Avatar

Most licences expire after a certain period of time in most countries and require to be renewed by the individual, they are not attached to your job/employment/employer.

User Avatar

I am seeking employment with your fine company. I am certain that this method of employment would suit me well.

User Avatar

Unless your employer signed some kind of agreement or contract with you guaranteeing you full employment after a certain length of time. Unless it was guaranteed to you, there is never any assurance of full-time employment.

User Avatar

If they are there to harass you, no. If they are there professionally, within certain limits and for certain reasons. If they are invited by either you or your new employer, yes.

User Avatar

Also known as "vicarious liability."Under the doctrine of agency (or master and servant), an employer may be liable for actions (or inactions) by employees, if the liability arises within the scope of the employment. It is imputed to the employer who has (presumably) given the employee certain powers in the employer's name.For example, a pizza-delivery company could be liable for a vehicle collision caused by an employee attempting to make a quicker delivery, but not for injuries caused by an employee who stops at a bar and gets into a fight (outside scope of employment).

User Avatar

The demand in a career of a certain field.

User Avatar

Employment Outlook is the chance of you getting a job in a certain field. This could include how many jobs are out there and how many jobs are needed in a certain field.

User Avatar

Absolutely... Unless you've specifically stated you will only work certain days (and your employer has accepted that) - then you should expect to work whatever days your employer asks you to.

User Avatar

The thing which disappoint while working for an emloyer is poor attitude of employer.

User Avatar

what is the difference between hot employer and preferred employer? prefer is ideal employer who regularly posts the vacancies on certain quantity hot employer is the one where vacancies are in some lot like many vacancies are available & keep increasing

User Avatar

Yes, the employer can dismiss the employee without notice at certain cercumstaces. This can be for theft.

User Avatar

No. You are only allowed to work a certain number of hours. How many hours depends on your age and country, which you will have to look up since you didn't mention these factors in the question. You should be set certain hours in your employment contract, which the employer cannot change once you have signed it. Forcing someone to stay where they do not want to be is called false imprisonment, which is a serious violation of the law.

User Avatar

Certain types of "customer information" may be confidential to the customer (and the company) and also comprise "trade secrets" that give the company an economic advantage over someone with the same information. In any case, an employee with access to such information has a fiduciary obligation of confidentiality to the employer.


Copyright © 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.