Can you tell if meat is spoiled if you don't have a sense of smell?

Many harmful microorganisms do not produce any odors. Smell alone is not a perfect indicator of spoilage.

Answer

You probably can't tell, but if no one else is around to sniff the meat for you, then "when in doubt, throw it out." But according to the Department of Agriculture, spoiled meat generally doesn't make people sick -- it's the pathogens that cause all the problems, like e.coli bacteria. I personally have cooked and consumed meat that I thought was a day or two past its prime, but have never suffered ill effects.

Answer

allowing your other senses to help. looking at the meat you would notice a change in color , sometimes the whole will be affected and sometimes only in spots. look carefully. the other way is texture and how it "feels". it can change in "density" (how firm or mushy it might feel). another change would be that a superficial film developes that you can feel.(a thin "slime" or slickness). the rule of "when in doubt throw it out" is a good one, follow it, especially if it concerns chicken, "ground" anything and seafoods. the importance of temperature cannot be stressed enough. a refrig should always be kept below 40 degrees and foods should always be heated to 145 degrees, (leftovers to 165 degrees). it is imperative to keep foods out of the 40 to 145 degree range!!! these temps allow rampant reproduction of bacteria.

Answer

Please also be aware that meat and especially chicken that's been unrefrigerated too long can contain bacteria or viruses that will give you food poisoning. These are absolutely odorless and colorless, so even with a keen sense of smell, you'll never know they're present. Foodborne illness is much more common than actually eating rotten food.