Property Law
Deeds and Ownership

Can you transfer a property that is willed to you in NY State without putting property in your name?

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2013-12-21 19:56:20
2013-12-21 19:56:20

You may be able to have the executor transfer the property directly from the estate with your consent. You should speak with the attorney who is handling the estate.

You may be able to have the executor transfer the property directly from the estate with your consent. You should speak with the attorney who is handling the estate.

You may be able to have the executor transfer the property directly from the estate with your consent. You should speak with the attorney who is handling the estate.

You may be able to have the executor transfer the property directly from the estate with your consent. You should speak with the attorney who is handling the estate.

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2013-12-21 19:56:20
2013-12-21 19:56:20

You may be able to have the executor transfer the property directly from the estate with your consent. You should speak with the attorney who is handling the estate.

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Related Questions


Unless the title transfer had restrictions on it, such as a survivorship clause, yes, it can be sold.

No. All heirs to an estate must sign for a valid transfer of the property. If the Heirs are missing there will be a method by which a court can appoint someone to sign for the lost or missing heirs.

If the property is subject to active liens, generally the devisee will acquire the property subject to those liens.

Yes, If you are the owner of the home. you can certainly buy insurance for your property.

Only insofar as the judgment can be levied against the estate of the deceased. Since it can be assumed that the willed property was part of the estate's assets then it can be liened if there are insufficient other funds in the estate's assets to satisfy the judgment.

In order for something to be willed to someone, it has to be in the estate. Both individuals will have equal rights to the property as tenants in common.

Property held in a joint tenancy automatically passes to the surviving owner. You cannot attach stipulations to it.

No. Property that you receive by a will IS an inheritance. Property received from a relative under the laws of intestacy when there was no will is also an inheritance.

No. Property owned by three people as joint tenants with the right of survivorship cannot be "willed" at all. When one owner dies their share automatically passes to the surviving joint tenants.No. Property owned by three people as joint tenants with the right of survivorship cannot be "willed" at all. When one owner dies their share automatically passes to the surviving joint tenants.No. Property owned by three people as joint tenants with the right of survivorship cannot be "willed" at all. When one owner dies their share automatically passes to the surviving joint tenants.No. Property owned by three people as joint tenants with the right of survivorship cannot be "willed" at all. When one owner dies their share automatically passes to the surviving joint tenants.

No. Technically, the deed does not have to be changed, because a will is an instrument of transfer. Just as a deed transfers property from a living person, a will transfers property from a deceased person. In many cases, estate deeds are made but that is only to confirm the transfer in the deed records. As long as your living in te house has been open to the other co-owners, there is no problem.

Yes. In order for title to real property to pass to the devisee the estate must be probated. You will not become the legal owner of the land until the will is allowed in cour, an executor is appointed and the probate process is completed. You should seek the advice of an attorney who specializes in probate matters in order to clear the title to the property.

If you mean the parents have deeded or willed the property to the person who will become the executrix, then, yes it is legal and not unusual, absent evidence of wrongful persuasion or the like.

Yes, but the mortgage will still have to be paid or the bank will take possession of the property by foreclosure.

Take a copy of the will - your birth certificate and the deeds of the property to a Soliciter and tell him what you want to do.

You can disclaim any inheritance that you don't want. However, you must do so in writing and you must specifically identify the property. You must disclaim the property within 9 months of when your interest in the property was created. You must not specify what is to be done with the property (you cannot, for example, specify that it should be given to someone else). You cannot have accepted any benefit from the property (you cannot, for example, live in the house or collect rent for eight months and then decide you don't want it).

milled, killed, build, tilled, willed, instilled, lilled,

If the deed is in JOINT ownership, the survivor gets it automatically. If there is a will, the property goes to whomever it is willed to. If there is no will, the laws of intestacy apply, giving the spouse a share and surviving children a share.

Because of taxes, yes....unless you have money to pay the taxes on it (one of them is the inheritance tax)That's in the United States, not sure about other places

No. The minor should be represented by a conservator or Guardian Ad Litem approved or appointed by the probate court.

If you mean adjective sense of 'willed' it is always preceded by another modifying adjective like 'ill-willed' or 'strong-willed' etc, in each case there are different words for for them.If you mean the past tense of the verb 'to will' it has different senses. In sense of 'to want, desire' the word 'willed' can have equivalents like 'hoshi katta' , 'nozomi mashita'. In sense of 'to decide, to determine' words like 'ketsui shimashita' , 'kime mashita' can be used for 'willed'.

driven, persistent, resolute, steadfast

The duration of The Woman Who Willed a Miracle is 2700.0 seconds.

Yes. The will must specifically state this. Or the inference is that you will still inheret the property, etc. unless deemed otherwise. Yes. The will must specifically state this. Or the inference is that you will still inheret the property, etc. unless deemed otherwise.

There are two options for translating "strong willed":obstinatuspervicax


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