Auto Loans and Financing
Apartments and Home Rentals
Landlord-Tenant Issues

Can your commercial landlord convert your written lease to an oral lease without notice within the term of the written lease?

252627

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
2005-11-05 14:06:44
2005-11-05 14:06:44

Generally once a lease is signed the terms cannot be amended unless all parties agree. The determination of what can and cannot be done is decided by the wording of the original agreement. However, a supposedly "oral/verbal" contract is difficult for a landlord to prove if it becomes an issue for the court. If the tenant did not agree to any amendment action being acceptable when the original contract was entered into, the landlord cannot arbitrarily make changes to the agreement.

1
๐Ÿ™
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Related Questions

User Avatar

No, without a written lease, the landlord can only evict the same as a month to month lease agreement (30 days) but the protections to the tenant and landlord are not stated.

User Avatar

Alan D. Sugarman has written: 'Commercial tenant's leasing transactions guide' -- subject(s): Commercial leases, Forms, Landlord and tenant

User Avatar

David C. Skinner has written: 'Alabama residential, commercial & mineral lease law' -- subject(s): Commercial leases, Landlord and tenant, Mining leases

User Avatar

Theodore H. Hellmuth has written: 'Lease audits' -- subject(s): Auditing, Commercial leases 'Real estate law' -- subject(s): Mortgages, Real estate development, Law and legislation, Vendors and purchasers, Landlord and tenant 'Missouri leasing guide for non-lawyers' -- subject(s): Landlord and tenant, Commercial leases

User Avatar

Matters such a locks are usually covered in a written lease. If it's not covered or if there is no written lease you probably can. BUT, you must give the landlord a key. The landlord has the right to enter in an emergency and upon reasonable notice to the tenant to inspect the premises. Keep in mind that landlord / tenant relationships without a written lease are generally governed by state law, so the conclusion may differ from state to state. When I was a landlord, there was an option to change the keys for a tenant. I had it done at my cost and held a key. Most locksmiths will not change the keys if you do not own the home. In many commercial leases the tenant is EXPECTED to change the locks and the landlord may not want to even have a key. For example, when renting a self-storage unit, the tenant would typically add his or her own lock to the unit. Upon default or emergency, the landlord would simply break the lock to gain entry, then put on a new lock.

User Avatar

A landlord cannot make changes to the lease after it has been signed without you agreeing in writing to the changes. You are under no obligation to agree to any changes. Any changes made without your written permission are not valid.

User Avatar

No, in order to enter the tenant's property for whatever reason, the landlord must give prior written notice; usually seven days.

User Avatar

James C. Hauser has written: 'Florida residential landlord--tenant manual' -- subject(s): Landlord and tenant 'Texas residential landlord-tenant law' -- subject(s): Landlord and tenant

User Avatar

Robert Hunter has written: 'A treatise on the law of landlord and tenant' -- subject(s): Landlord and tenant

User Avatar

Kenneth E. Meiser has written: 'Tenant-landlord' -- subject(s): Landlord and tenant

User Avatar

Edgar Jacob Lauer has written: 'The Tenant and his landlord' -- subject- s -: Landlord and tenant

User Avatar

Maurice Stern has written: 'Trickett on the law of landlord and tenant in Pennsylvania' -- subject(s): Landlord and tenant

User Avatar

E. George Daher has written: 'Landlord and tenant law' -- subject(s): Landlord and tenant

User Avatar

Michael H. Marcus has written: 'Landlord/tenant rights in Oregon' -- subject(s): Landlord and tenant, Popular works 'Landlord/tenant rights in Oregon' 'Landlord Tenant Rights in Oregon (Self-Counsel Series)'

User Avatar

Mary Harasim has written: 'Landlord/tenant rights in Alberta' -- subject(s): Landlord and tenant, Popular works

User Avatar

Gary Tondorf-Dick has written: 'How to be a landlord' -- subject(s): Landlord and tenant, Rental housing

User Avatar

Judith M. Moretz has written: 'How to convert single family homes into high rent commercial properties' -- subject(s): Commercial buildings, Conversion to commercial use, Real estate investment, Rent, Single family Housing, Small business

User Avatar

Get StartedA real estate lease is a written agreement between a Landlord (lessor) and a Tenant (lessee) establishing the rights and responsibilities of each party. The Landlord is the owner of real estate (also known as "premises") who leases (rents) that property to a Tenant for the Tenant's use. A "residential" lease applies to real estate used as a residence, while a "commercial" lease applies to business property.A written lease should be prepared and signed whenever property is rented, to reduce the likelihood of misunderstandings between the Tenant and the Landlord regarding the rental arrangement.

User Avatar

You probably don't have to (landlord/tenant laws vary by state), but you would be really stupid to rent property without a written agreement.

User Avatar

John Emerson Bennett has written: 'Law of landlord and tenant' -- subject(s): Landlord and tenant, Forms (Law)

User Avatar

Robert S. Schoshinski has written: 'American law of landlord and tenant' -- subject(s): Cases, Landlord and tenant

User Avatar

Max C. Liss has written: 'Illinois cases on landlord and tenant' -- subject(s): Cases, Landlord and tenant

User Avatar

Janice L. Mills has written: 'North Carolina landlord and tenant' -- subject(s): Forms, Landlord and tenant

User Avatar

Jack Cummins has written: 'The landlord cometh'

User Avatar

R.A Donell has written: 'Landlord and tenant'


Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.