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How do you hook up an electric range into a 3-phase switch box with a number 2 service cable coming into the box and cartridge type fuses?

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2015-12-17 19:45:38
2015-12-17 19:45:38
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You shouldn't. However, in a residence, you don't have 3-phase. You have single phase delivered by two "hot wires" and a ground. In that case, you would need to determine if you have adequate electrical capacity for the range. That means a spare 40 or 50 Amps for an oven / range combination, 30 Amps for just a cook top. Assuming capacity, you probably still have a problem with adding a circuit to the fuse box. There are limitations on how many fuses you can have. In any case, you need fuses rated 30-50 A, as appropriate, and four conductor cable (3-wire plus ground #10-6 AWG, as appropriate). Home stores sell appropriately rated receptacles / supply cords to complete the installation. If you are not absolutely sure of what you are doing, this is a job for an electrician.

In regards to the first answer. 220 is not delivered with two hot wires and a ground. 220 Volt Service (200 amp usually) is delivered from the power company using 2 hot legs and a NEUTRAL. The ground is provided by the home owner's electrical service installation. Neutral should never be treated as a GROUND. It is not a GROUND.

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My parents lived above my fathers machine shop...the shop had 220 volt 3 phase power....my mother used her wood range for years and would not part with it. My grandmother moved out of province and gave her electric range to my mom so she decided to use both, very handy for large family get together...We hooked the electric range to the 3 phase 220 power...just used 2 of the 3 hot wires and all was fine...we did add a breaker box between the 3 phase bus box and the range, so it was done by code and had two 30 amp breakers...never a problem. However, do not attempt this with 440 volt power unless you step it down with the appropriate transformer...also VERY IMPORTANT to ground the range to the ground on the service panel!

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The assumption here is that you have a single-phase range, but there are also 3-phase commercial ranges. The hookup for a 3-phase range is the same as any other 3-phase 4-wire circuit.

For a single-phase range, this is a common need for kitchens at commercial buildings and offices that have 3-phase power. You can hook a range (wired for single phase) to a 3-phase, 208 volt or 240 volt switch box by using two of the cartridge-type fuses. First, check the range nameplate for voltage rating and circuit Amperes. Use the proper size fuses and try to use a spare fuse holder that has only two poles. If the only one available has 3-poles, then leave out one of the fuses and only connect your two range wires to two of the fuses. Also connect the neutral and ground wires to the neutral and ground buses in the switch box.

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