Car Selling

How do you make a private sale of a vehicle with a lien in Georgia?

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2008-05-01 20:09:52
2008-05-01 20:09:52

You must contact the lender. They hold legal rights to the vehicle. Selling it without their approval will get you into some financial trouble. Call the lender.

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If he pays off the lien yes. If not, then that vehicle is pretty much owned by the lien holder too! it doesnt make sense selling car


If you purchased the car in full with cash then there shouldn't be a lien. Look at your paperwork to make sure it says "Paid In Full" if it does the dealer has no right to repossess a paid in full vehicle. A lien is where you are making payments for a vehicle and the vehicle is being used a collateral until the vehicle is paid off.


Legally No. How can you sell something you do not own. As long as there is a lien, you do not own the vehicle outright. Go see the lender and get a lien release, if you no longer have a loan on the vehicle. Remember the lender is part owner of the vehicle until you make that last payment. If you clear the lien buy using the proceeds from the sale, you can guarantee a title within 30 days (required by law) to the new buyer. The lien holder will then release the title.


MORE DETAILS My wife and I are both on a loan for our vehicle but I have a 2nd vehicle I use and she uses the one under the lien Currently we both are on the registration and insurance To make insurance rate more affordable for us can I remove myself from the reg and ins even though I am on the lien.


In short, yes. You just have to sign a legal agreement that the person that currently owns the car is willing to put up the title of the car as collateral for the private loan. Make sure the person who has the loan possesses the title and has filed a lien with the Department of Motor Vehicles. *Always consult an attorney for legal matters.


Repossession occurs when the borrower fails to make payments on a loan secured by a vehicle. If "the bank" is not the lien holder then it has no authority to take possession of the car by repossession. However, if a bank obtains a judgment lien against you in court for a different debt, it can use the judgment lien to seize your car, or any other property, to satisfy the judgment.Repossession occurs when the borrower fails to make payments on a loan secured by a vehicle. If "the bank" is not the lien holder then it has no authority to take possession of the car by repossession. However, if a bank obtains a judgment lien against you in court for a different debt, it can use the judgment lien to seize your car, or any other property, to satisfy the judgment.Repossession occurs when the borrower fails to make payments on a loan secured by a vehicle. If "the bank" is not the lien holder then it has no authority to take possession of the car by repossession. However, if a bank obtains a judgment lien against you in court for a different debt, it can use the judgment lien to seize your car, or any other property, to satisfy the judgment.Repossession occurs when the borrower fails to make payments on a loan secured by a vehicle. If "the bank" is not the lien holder then it has no authority to take possession of the car by repossession. However, if a bank obtains a judgment lien against you in court for a different debt, it can use the judgment lien to seize your car, or any other property, to satisfy the judgment.


If the dealer holds the lien and is the one that loaned you the money to purchase the vehicle he can repossess the vehicle if you fail to make your payments on time. Otherwise the selling dealer has no claim on the vehicle whatsoever.


None, unless the person who is named on the title chooses to make an agreement with the lender to refinance the car in their name. A title which has a lien against it does not confer ownership to the title holder. The vehicle belongs to the lender/lien holder until the loan agreement is paid.



713.585 Enforcement of lien by sale of motor vehicle. - A person claiming a lien under s. 713.58 for performing labor or services on a motor vehicle may enforce such lien by sale of the vehicle in accordance with the following procedures:(1)The lienor must give notice, by certified mail, return receipt requested, within 15 business days, excluding Saturday and Sunday, from the beginning date of the assessment of storage charges on said motor vehicle, to the registered owner of the vehicle, to the customer as indicated on the order for repair, and to all other persons claiming an interest in or lien thereon, as disclosed by the records of the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles or of a corresponding agency of any other state in which the vehicle appears registered. Such notice must contain: (a)A description of the vehicle (year, make, vehicle identification number) and its location. (b)The name and address of the owner of the vehicle, the customer as indicated on the order for repair, and any person claiming an interest in or lien thereon. (c)The name, address, and telephone number of the lienor. (d)Notice that the lienor claims a lien on the vehicle for labor and services performed and storage charges, if any, and the cash sum which, if paid to the lienor, would be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien claimed by the lienor. (e)Notice that the lien claimed by the lienor is subject to enforcement pursuant to this section and that the vehicle may be sold to satisfy the lien. (f)If known, the date, time, and location of any proposed or scheduled sale of the vehicle. No vehicle may be sold earlier than 60 days after completion of the repair work. (g)Notice that the owner of the vehicle or any person claiming an interest in or lien thereon has a right to a hearing at any time prior to the scheduled date of sale by filing a demand for hearing with the clerk of the circuit court in the county in which the vehicle is held and mailing copies of the demand for hearing to all other owners and lienors as reflected on the notice. (h)Notice that the owner of the vehicle has a right to recover possession of the vehicle without instituting judicial proceedings by posting bond in accordance with the provisions of s. 559.917.


It depends on if you have a lien placed on your vehicle (by you lender. If you own the car free and clear, you can take the insurance money and not repair the car, but if there is a lien on your vehicle more often than not the insurance company will make the check out to you and your bank.


The person the lien is against is still obliged to make the payments. If they fail, a lawsuit can be filed.


The car belongs to the person listed as the owner on the title. Listing someone as the lien holder does not make them the owner.You can't transfer a motor vehicle when you know there's a lien on it. The lien would be reflected on the title and a prudent buyer wouldn't take title that is encumbered by a lien.


No. The purpose of a lien is to make you pay your debt. The lien must be paid before you can sell or mortgage your property.


A lien is a term to denote that the vehicles owner owes money on it. This could be to the bank etc. There are also mechanics liens on your car while it's in the shop till you pay the bill of repairs. To pay off a lien you simply pay the debt in full. A lien is a legal maneuver such that the title can't be transferred etc. until the debt is paid. If you don't make your payments then the person or institution holding the lien can exercise it by repossessing the vehicle.


It can be impounded by the police, a repo man, or for being parked illegally on private property. It can be forfeited if you fail to make payments on time and the bank repossesses the vehicle.


If lender's name is on the title as owner and/or lien holder they have the legal right to recover the vehicle and sell it if they choose to do so.


First off, make sure the judgement for the lien is signed by the judge.


You will need to pay off the lien first, or arrange with the lienholder to be able to make a sale.


In order to title an abandoned vehicle in the state of Pennsylvania, you will need to fill out form MV-956 from the PA DMV in addition to having proof that the vehicle has been abandoned. You will also need to contact the local law enforcement agency to make sure no one has attempted to claim the vehicle or place a lien against it.


Typically because you owe money on it. When you take out a loan, the lender will use the car as collateral. This way if you default (fail to make payment) the lender can reposes (also known as recovery) the car to attempt to recover their loss. Once you have satisfied your debt the lien will be lifted. You can then go to the SOS or DMV with your title and prof of lien holders satisfaction and have the lien removed from the vehicles title. Some financiers do this last step for you. Liens can however be more complicated. The lien is partial ownership of the said collateral, meaning you cannot sell a vehicle without the consent of the lien holder. Lenders can get away with it because upon your failure to make payments, you void the contract and forfeit your portion of ownership.


Few things to be aware of when buying a used vehicle overall, not necessarily mid size are: Try to get a car proof report done on the vehicle, make sure it is lien free, and free of any major accidents. Make sure it is not a U.S vehicle, or Quebec vehicle if possible. You shouldn't be concern about minor collision reports such as front or rear bumpers. As long as it is free of frame damage.


Yes. It is called a mechanic's lien and they can maintain possession of the vehicle until the balance owed is paid in full. They may be willing to enter into an arrangement whereby you would make payments to them, but they are not required to do so.


AS long as the title remains in your name, you are liable for tags appearing on the vehicle..You should notify your local motor vehicle dept. of the ownership change.


Have a lien on a property can make it difficult to sale. The only way to remove a lien is to pay the debt.



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