Timing and Firing Orders
Chevy G20
VW Golf
1995-2005 Chevy Cavaliers

How do you set your ignition timing and motor timing on an 1800 mk 1 golf and what is the firing ratio?

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2015-07-15 19:58:01
2015-07-15 19:58:01

find yourself a book, and a timing light to do it right...search a little on the web for a MK 1 fanatics web page that may have diagrams...

when your fanatical yourself, you can post all kinds of stories and specs and stuff yourself...! :)

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Related Questions


The lowest compression ratio of a compression-ignition engine that allows a specific fuel to be ignited by compression ignition.

It wouldn't necessarily run better at all - it all depends on your ignition and timing setup and compression ratio.

You have an ignition Control Module that you can check that controls ignition timing Throttle Position Sensor that tells the computer where the throttle is so it can regulate and give the correct air fuel ratio.

It can refer to the fuel to air ratio, in the piston of an engine, prior to ignition.

Reducing an engines need for higher octane fuel requires lowering the static compression ratio of the engine(changing heads and/or pistons) and retarding the ignition somewhat. Cars with a static compression ratio of 9:1 or less can run on "regular" with just dialing back the ignition timing and not pushing the engine hard. Reducing compression ratios or retarding timing will cost you power however, and may cause your engine to run less efficiently(higher emissions). on modern computer controlled cars, changing the ignition timing is far more difficult than on a vehicle with a standard distributor.

The compression ratio is 8.5:1 supercharged motor and 9.4:1 for the non-supercharged motor.

For a Briggs and Stratton motor 3.5 motor used straight gas and oil in the crank-case, there is no ratio.

S.I Engine lower compression Ratio is 6 to 11

The pressure ratio does not cause pinging in an internal combustion engine. Pinging is the result of the air/fuel mixture igniying before the piston is in the propper position. Chep gas will cause pinging because it is igniting too quickly. Too high a compression ratio will do the same thing. Ingnition timing that is too far advanced will do the same thing. Back off your ignition timing two degrees at a time until the pinging stops, or buy a higher octane fuel.

Mixing ratio should be 50:1

ratio of energy output to energy input.

A backfire is when the ignition of fuel doesn't take place in the ignition/combustion chamber, it(a backfire) can take place in the intake or exhaust. It can be caused by a fuel to air ratio not being correct, also if the timing of the spark is not just right that could cause it to back fire. It could be running lean with not enough fuel and too much air, or could have too much fuel and not enough air. It could be because the intake valves are not shut when the combustion takes place, therefore the combustion would take place in the wrong spot. The most likely cause are from: 1. Incorrect timing, the timing issue could be caused by bad wiring/ or bad ignition. 2. Incorrect fuel to air ratio, bad fuel filter, low fuel pressure-caused by weak fuel pump.

shaving the heads of the motor or enlarging the pistons

The fuel to oil ratio for a 1962 model Johnson outboard is 24:1.

spark ignition itself can easily burnt the air fuel mixture hence the high compression ratio is not needed.

1) no spark 2) no or incorrect fuel or fuel/air ratio 3) insufficient cranking speed 4) low engine compression 5) incorrect timing If your caravan has distributorless ignition, check the crankshaft position sensor.

Well if you had enough experience you could change the gear ratio in the gearbox, or buy a bigger motor.

The ratio on a 2003 is 50:1 and should be the same for the 2001

A backfire is when the ignition of fuel doesn't take place in the ignition/combustion chamber, it(a backfire) can take place in the intake or exhaust. It can be caused by a fuel to air ratio not being correct, also if the timing of the spark is not just right that could cause it to back fire. It could be running lean with not enough fuel and too much air, or could have too much fuel and not enough air. It could be because the intake valves are not shut when the combustion takes place, therefore the combustion would take place in the wrong spot. The most likely cause are from: 1. Incorrect timing, the timing issue could be caused by bad wiring/ or bad ignition. 2. Incorrect fuel to air ratio, bad fuel filter, low fuel pressure-caused by weak fuel pump. Most cars will have the same reason to backfire, as long as it's an internal combustion engine it shouldn't differ...

A backfire is when the ignition of fuel doesn't take place in the ignition/combustion chamber, it(a backfire) can take place in the intake or exhaust. It can be caused by a fuel to air ratio not being correct, also if the timing of the spark is not just right that could cause it to back fire. It could be running lean with not enough fuel and too much air, or could have too much fuel and not enough air. It could be because the intake valves are not shut when the combustion takes place, therefore the combustion would take place in the wrong spot. The most likely cause are from: 1. Incorrect timing, the timing issue could be caused by bad wiring/ or bad ignition. 2. Incorrect fuel to air ratio, bad fuel filter, low fuel pressure-caused by weak fuel pump. Most cars will have the same reason to backfire, as long as it's an internal combustion engine it shouldn't differ...


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