Custody
Children and the Law
Child Support

How much does a parent pay for child support for one child?

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2005-09-18 17:59:35
2005-09-18 17:59:35

Child support laws are determined by the state in which the child/children reside which is where the support will be ordered. Some states use the "income shares model" of determining support, which is basically the amount needed to give the child/children the same standard of living they would have experienced if the marriage or relationship had not ended. Other states base the amount on the percentage of net income of the parent ordered to pay the support, for example. 1 child25% and so forth, the maximum is generally set at 40%-50% of the net income. (For more information http://www.child-support-collections.com)

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Since the child is a minor, they cannot file for child support. The custodial parent is the one who has to file for the child support for the child.

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The biological parents have to pay child support to the one who have the child whether it's a grandparent, sister or the state. If the custodial parent do not actually have the child living with them the custody order has to be changed as well as the child support order.

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Because you are not married and filed for child support. You have to pay child support to one parent and that has to be to the one with custody. If you both had 50/50 custody it could look differently but you only have visitation.

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Parents often have joint custody with one parent having physical custody. Generally, the parent with physical custody receives child support from the non-physical-custody parent. There are other arrangements whereby the parents share physical custody. States are required to have child support guidelines and the guidelines will control who pays child support and how much. The court will issue a court order to that effect.Parents often have joint custody with one parent having physical custody. Generally, the parent with physical custody receives child support from the non-physical-custody parent. There are other arrangements whereby the parents share physical custody. States are required to have child support guidelines and the guidelines will control who pays child support and how much. The court will issue a court order to that effect.Parents often have joint custody with one parent having physical custody. Generally, the parent with physical custody receives child support from the non-physical-custody parent. There are other arrangements whereby the parents share physical custody. States are required to have child support guidelines and the guidelines will control who pays child support and how much. The court will issue a court order to that effect.Parents often have joint custody with one parent having physical custody. Generally, the parent with physical custody receives child support from the non-physical-custody parent. There are other arrangements whereby the parents share physical custody. States are required to have child support guidelines and the guidelines will control who pays child support and how much. The court will issue a court order to that effect.

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== == == == The answer will depend on the sources of the respective incomes. Yes, if the parent seeking child support is getting any assistance from the government, child support is a requirement. But both parents can agree not to pay child support since each has one child. Or, both can pay child support for the child not in their home.

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If physical custody of a child is transferred from one parent to the other, you need to petition the court for a change in support order. It is possible the other parent will now be paying you child support.

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No. The child support order remains in effect until it is modified by the court. Marriage by either parent does not normally affect child support.

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If a child is receiving money from the government because one parent has a disability, chances are that the parent will not be expected to pay child support in addition to that money. The court order that is in place controls what happens regarding support.

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The custodial parent is the parent in which the child resides with. My son lives with me and I am the custodial parent, his dad has visitation rights and pays child support.

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Children are never entitled to child support and cannot sue their parents for child support money. Child support is a debt paid from one parent to the other.

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It is assumed you mean the parents have joint legalcustody and one parent has physical custody.Generally, the parent with physical custody is awarded the child support since child support is intended to help pay for the child needs, living expenses and all the associated costs of raising the child. The custodial parent has much more in living expenses that are associated with raising the child.See related question link.

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Because that child still needs support and the birth parent is the one who should pay it.

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Well it depends on the law of the country and demands of the parent (the one that's living with the child).

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Each parent usually pays their own fees for child support. One parent can always request that the other parent pays for the fees incurred due to the hearing.

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the money given directly to the child will not be considered child support this money has to go directly to the parent with whom the child is living

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Yes, unless the non-custodial parent gets custody. In that case the non-custodial parent must file a motion to terminate the child support order. The child support should be paid to whoever has custody of the child. If it's not the non-custodial parent then the child support order should be modified to reflect the party that should receive the child support payments. You have to pay for your child so you have to pay to the one who has custody while the other parent is in prison. If the state has custody you will pay the state.

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well when the parent responsible for the child support has "no income" he should notify the child support court of his situation, they may modify the monthly payment assuming the parent can pay at least $50-60 per week or $200-240 monthly. if after this modification the parent still cant pay, the court may order the grandparents to pay the child support until the parent can pay.

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No. Very few states allow for child support to be issued 30 years after birth, but even if you lived in one that did, child support is an obligation paid to the other parent and is never owed directly to the child.

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Probably not. But if that parent was ordered to pay child support and is not doing so, then they can be sued for that.

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If the parties actually share joint custody and have the child with them 50% of the time, then there may or not be child support depending the the parties' respective incomes. If the parties share parental responsibilty but one of them is considered the "custodial parent" and the other had visitation, then there would be a child support obligation on the part of the non-custodial parent." If one of the parties is the "sole" parent, the child support will probably be the same.

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If you are paying support for one child and have one additional child you are responsible for, you pay 17% of your net income (after taxes but before insurance and retirement is taken out).

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You may since sole custody implies the child lives with that parent 100% of the time. With joint custody the child may dwell with the other parent for part of the time or with one parent all of the time with visitations for the other parent. It depends on the details and the state child support guidelines.

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Not under normal circumstances. The custodial parent does not have to claim child support as taxable income and generally the custodial parent is the one who can claim the child as a dependent deduction.


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