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If a married couple both have dental insurance provided by employer can you drop one and use as primary?

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2008-09-18 06:48:04
2008-09-18 06:48:04

Maybe. This is actually a question for your wife's benefits coordinator at her employer. She should ask her supervisor who that would be. If there is a significant change in your insurance status, you can make changes. For example, if you lost your job you could be added to your wife's insurance immediately. If there's no change in status, you will have to wait until the 'open enrollement' period, usually December for most plans. Many dental insurance plans are only available with the medical plan. So, you might have to change ALL your insurance, not just dental, to get your wife's dental plan. Also, it might be much more expensive. Many employers pay 30% to 70% of the cost of the employees insurance, but nothing toward dependents insurance. So, it might cost 3 or 4 times as much for you both to have her plan. Here are the questions your wife needs to ask her benefit coordinator: When is the open enrollment period? Can you get your wife's dental plan only, or must you take her medical plan as well? How much will it cost to insure both of you?

It will all depend to what will be the cover of your insurance..

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