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If the lease holder has passed away can the person who is using the car continue to use it if he makes the payments?

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2015-07-16 19:24:24
2015-07-16 19:24:24

YOU ASKED:

"Can the Lease Holder Take the Auto from my possession or is that against the law if the payments are made regardless?"

ANSWER:

Yes, the leaseholder can (and should) re-take possession of the vehicle. The person who leased the car is dead. The lease agreement, too, is dead, save for the clause that requires his estate (which exisits despite your saying it doesn't) to return it.

Just take the car back to the leasing company and ask for the highest-level person in the office. Ask him/her if you can sit down with him/her and explain the situation. Ask him/her if you can take over the lease. Strengthen your case by getting a letter from the administrator or executor of your boss's estate recommending that the leasing company allow you to take over the lease. Expect the leasing company to completely re-write the paper... including a credit check on you, etc.

However, it's possible (highly unlikely, but technically possible) that the lease manager will just cross your boss's name off the paper and write your name in its place because of your history with both your boss and as the person who has been driving the car. Of course, even if he did that, he'd need your signature on the lease in place of your boss's. Sadly, this seemingly simple solution has so many potential liability pitfalls that it's far more likely that the lease manager will need to re-write the entire deal.

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