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If you disputed items on your credit file and they were deleted by the 3 credit bureaus can the credit card company come back and try to put them back on your file?

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2006-11-01 16:40:40
2006-11-01 16:40:40

Usually not, they had t6heir shot and dropped the ball. However, you have to remember that the credit card companies pay the bills at the credit reporting agencies. There are a lot of shenanigans that go on. You need to visit www.ftc.gov and review a copy of the Fair Credit Reporting Act.

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A bankruptcy can only be deleted by disputing it to the credit bureaus. Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act, the credit bureaus have 30 days to verify the listing or it must removed from your credit report. This will delete it from your court records only your credit report.


Collections can be disputed to the credit bureaus using the Fair Credit Reporting Act. The credit bureaus have 30 days to verify the listing or the listing must be removed from your credit report.


The three major credit bureaus are Experian, Equifax, and Transunion. Typically when a credit card company runs your credit, they will run it through all three credit bureaus.


If they have reason to believe the account was reported or disputed fraudulently or that new information has been discovered, they can investigate further.


They can be, but it would be a mistake on the part of the credit bureaus. You can alert them to the problem and they are required under the Fair Credit Reporting Act to rectify the situation or face fines. A second scenario is that the accounts were disputed, during which time they cannot be reported on your credit, and then found to be valid. They can place the accounts back on your report but they should advise you that they're doing it.


Yes you can remove a bankruptcy from your credit report. You must dispute it to the credit bureaus using the Fair Credit Reporting Act. The credit bureaus have 30 days to verify the listing or it must be removed from your credit report. A bankruptcy should only be disputed if it is erroneous or inaccurate.


It happens and can be disputed. Call you credit card company or credit agencies.


There are 3 credit bureaus


Credit restoration is a process where you, a company or attorneys request that the bureaus (Experian, Equifax and TransUnion) validate that each account on your report is yours and is reporting accurately. According to law if the bureaus cannot provide this information the account must be deleted from your reports. However getting this done can be a bit tough if you don't know the ins and outs of the credit restoration field.Credit restoration can be done by yourself or by a company. You involves disputing your negative listings to each of the credit bureaus and waiting up to 30-45 days for them to verify the listings with the original creditors.


I can only speak from my own experience. It does indeed appear on our credit report and also states that the mortgage company is filing a claim against us--even though we did not reaffirm the loan. Completely wrong and I've disputed it many times with ALL the credit bureaus but they will not remove it. I'm not sure if there's a government organization that can help force the mortgage company to report correctly to credit bureaus or one that can force the credit bureaus to actually DO an investigation when you dipute it. No win situation, I'm afraid


Yes, a creditor can remove a charge off from your account and your credit reports. Credit bureaus can also delete charge offs from your credit report if they are disputed and not verified.


Online Credit Reports are extremely accurate if they are obtained from on of the 3 major credit reporting bureaus. Be careful that you don't get scammed by checking your report through a company that is not affiliated with the 3 Credit Bureaus.


You can dispute bankruptcies and items included in bankruptcies the same as any other negative item on your credit report. You must submit a dispute letter to the credit bureaus stating why the item(s) are being disputed. The credit bureaus have 30 days to verify the items or it must be removed from your credit report.


A late payment can be removed from your credit report. Any information you believe to be erroneous or inaccurate can be disputed with the 3 major credit bureaus and if that information is not verified, it must be removed.


From the major Credit Bureaus. Experian, Equifax, & Trans Union.


Credit bureaus update at the beginning of every month.


The top three business credit bureaus are Dun & Bradstreet, Business Experian and Business Equifax. These credit bureaus control 99% of the credit bureau market.


The best thing you can do is work on removing the negative items that are hurting your credit score. That means disputing to the credit bureaus the items that are pulling you down. They will have 30 days to verify the item being disputed or it must be removed from your credit report.


$0. Credit bureaus do not have a minimum amount reporting requirements.



YES, THIS COLLECTION ACCOUNT CAN BE DISPUTED; WHICH MEANS THAT AFTER THIS IS DISPUTED YOU CAN ALSO REQUEST FOR THIS ACCOUNT TO BE REMOVED FOR GOOD WITHOUT HAVING TO WAIT FOR THE SEVEN YEAR PERIOD. THIS WILL ALLOW YOU TO HAVE A CLEAN CREDIT HISTORY WHICH IN TURN INCREASE YOUR CREDIT RATING.


In order to report information to the credit bureaus, a company or individual would have to become a contributing client of the bureaus. There is an expense involved and there are also federal statutes which must be followed. So, for the most part, private individuals do not report to the major credit reporting agencies.


There are three main credit bureaus where one can get a copy of one's credit rating. These credit bureaus are Experian, Equifax and TransUnion. One can find the contact information for each of these on the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation website.


The CRA (Credit Reporting Agency/Bureaus).



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