Computers
Windows XP
Operating Systems
Hard Disk Drives

If you have a dual boot system with two hard drives how do you make it so that no matter which one you boot to the drive letter for the one you boot to will be C?

313233

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
2017-02-06 07:04:16
2017-02-06 07:04:16

In Windows 2000:

Assuming that the computer has IDE drives, the first thing to do is to install each operating system on each disk. Set one drive as Master and the other as Slave. Install both drives in the computer. Start the computer and it will boot into The first drive. Open Windows Explorer, go to Tools -> Folder Options and click the view tab. Select the "Show hidden files and folders" button, click Apply, then OK. Expand My Computer and select the "C" drive. Locate the "boot.ini" file, right click on it and select "Properties". If the read only box is checked, UNcheck it, click apply, OK. If it's already unchecked, leave it alone - click cancel. Double click on the boot.ini file to open it in Notepad. Under the [Operating Systems] heading, under the 2000 Pro entry on a new line, add this entry:

multi(0)disk(1)rdsk(0)partition(1)\WINNT="Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional" /fastdetect (if WINNT is your Window directory)

Save and reboot. You should now have both systems listed in the choices menu. Select the second Windows 2000 and cross your fingers. You should now have a dual-disk dual boot setup. If it fails, you can always boot back into the first drive as long as you don't change that entry in the boot.ini file.

In Windows 2000/XP:

Assuming that the computer has IDE drives, the first thing to do is to install each operating system on each disk. Put one drive in the computer and install XP on it. When that's done, remove it, install the second drive and install 2000 Pro on it. Remove it. On the drive that has XP, set that drive as master, and set the 2000 Pro drive as slave (XP will boot W2k, but W2k will not boot XP). Install both drives in the computer. Start the computer and it will boot into XP. In XP, open Windows Explorer, go to Tools -> Folder Options and click the view tab. Select the "Show hidden files and folders" button, click Apply, then OK. Expand My Computer and select the "C" drive. Locate the "boot.ini" file, right click on it and select "Properties". If the read only box is checked, UNcheck it, click apply, OK. If it's already unchecked, leave it alone - click cancel. Double click on the boot.ini file to open it in Notepad. Under the [Operating Systems] heading, under the XP entry on a new line, add this entry:

multi(0)disk(1)rdsk(0)partition(1)\WINNT="Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional" /fastdetect

Save and reboot. You should now have both systems listed in the choices menu. Select Windows 2000 and cross your fingers. You should now have a dual-disk dual boot setup. If it fails, you can always boot back into XP as long as you don't change that entry in the boot.ini file

In Windows/Linux:

The easiest way is to have Windows on the primary partition or hard drive and to use a program called Wingrub. There are examples in the Wingrub program on how to set it up. Wingrub can also be used to dual boot XP/2000 & 9x/ME despite it's warning to the contrary.

1
๐Ÿ™
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Related Questions

User Avatar

You have no hard drives listed. You have the ability to assign any drive letter (except the Main 'C' ) to your hard drives using "Computer Management"

User Avatar

The primary drive letter is C: by default. Drive letters A: and B: are reserved for the Floppy Disk Drives.

User Avatar

The default annotation C: typically refers to the primary hard drive or primary partition of a hard drive from which the operating system is booted. The reason it is typically the C: letter drive is that, back in the day, a 3.5" disk drive was annotated as A: by default and the 5" or floppy drive was annotated as B: by default. The drive letter D: is usually utilized to indicate the default annotation of the primary optical (cd-rom or dvd-rom) drive of the computer. Due to the creation of hard drive partitions, (or devisions of a hard drive to create virtually separate drives) it is possible for one hard drive to have multiple drive letters typically ascending in letter from E: (Drive C: Primary Hard Drive Drive D: Primary Optical drive. Drives E:, F:, G:, etc secondary hard drives which are also known as slave drives.) Windows is capable of customizing the drive letter annotations to suit the user, (including the primary drive annotation of C:) which is why this is not universal for all computers. However, for Windows, the primary hard drive from which the operating system is booted is always annotated as C: by default. If the drive letter has been changed in the operating system only, a menu will typically pop up on boot up on at least one occasion asking for the drive letter of the hard drive on which the operating system is loaded. (Unless the motherboard settings are changed, the motherboard will automatically try to boot the operating system from drive C:)

User Avatar

Floppy Drives are normally A or B. But you can designate any letter you wish. It is up to you.

User Avatar

The convention of assigning letters to drives is mainly a MS-DOS/Windows thing. (It happens in other operating systems as well, like VM/CMS in which the drives are actually "virtual" drives, but I assume you're talking about the much more widely known Windows operating system.) Technically you can assign whatever letter you want to a drive, but by tradition the first hard drive is usually C (A and B were used for floppy drives, back when computers actually had floppy drives).

User Avatar

CD drives are supported via a class driver; the operating system does not care what speed the drive is.

User Avatar

That depends on how many drives or virtual drives you have on your computer. Mainly the C: drive has Windows on it, if you only have a C: drive all your information and programs go here, but if you have multiple drives C: drive should be mainly for your Windows operating system.

User Avatar

A drive is a temporary storage device such as a Floppy disk device, Cdrom, DVD player or burner, Hard drive, flash drive, or memory reader. a D-drive is just a lettered drive designation. It could be any one of the drives listed above, or any number of other types of drives. Most system builders start with an A-drive and usually assign a Floppy drive to that letter. B drive letters are second floppy drive (if present), a C-drive letter is usually saved for a hard drive and D drive letter is usually used for CD/DVD/blue-ray drives, however, these designations are not exclusive and there is no hard rule as to what letters go with which drive types. There are any number of these designated letters, and different computers are built with any number of drives.

User Avatar

Each disk partition, regardless of whether there are more than one physical drives in the system, is given a drive letter.

User Avatar

Sandra gives you the detailed information needed about your drives and system, as well as compares your current drive(s) to other drives on the market.

User Avatar

MSDOS and Microsoft Windows identifies drives by single letters (many other operating system allow drives to be named with words or phrases):drive A the first internal floppy diskette drive (usually not used anymore)drive B the second internal floppy diskette drive (usually not used anymore)drive C the first internal hard disk drivedrives D through Z additional drives, may be internal or external, hard disk drives or optical drives, etc.

User Avatar

I drive to work every morning. She drives a car. My computer has one drive. / My computer has two drives. My brother drives me crazy. His thirst for knowledge drives him to study harder.

User Avatar

Drive/drives is the present tense.I driveWe driveYou driveHe/she drivesThey driveDriven is the past participle.

User Avatar

C: drive is the main hard drive on your computer. Hard drives are identified by letter, with C: being reserved for the first bootable drive in a computer.

User Avatar

you don't need a hard drive to run an operating system or store files because there are other storage options available like CD's, flash drives, solid state drives but you need an operting system to make a computer function so if the operating system is on the hard drive you would need the hard drive for the computer to function with your personal settings, files and operating system.

User Avatar

You can'tassigntwo different drives the same letter. If you are having an hard drive or hard disk then you can make different partition and then assign each partition differently, but can not assign same letter for two or more drives.

User Avatar

On the older style ATA drives, now called PATA or simply IDE, each drive chain had two positions for drives. One was called the Master, and the other the Slave drive. The drives performed in exactly the same manner, and the only difference most people would notice was that the Master drive was given a drive letter before the slave drive. In short, a Slave drive does everything a Master drive does.

User Avatar

Atmost four drives can be mapped to a windows 2000 operating system computer. It can have different names like z name can be used for a drive.

User Avatar

my desk top c & d drives hide (dont show in C & D drive )but system is working how un hide my C & D drives

User Avatar

A Jazz drive is similar to a Zip drive. Jazz drives are external storage devices that use cartridges to store information on. With portable hard drives and flash drives available, the Jazz drives are obsolete.

User Avatar

Default drive letter for a hard drive is C On my computer there were two hard drives installed, and the second was D CD drive is E USB ports are F, G, H, I, J, and K on mine

User Avatar

It depends what you are copying them to. If you are copying them to another hard drive, it will have a different drive letter. it is the same with USB drives.

User Avatar

Drives merely read; burners write as well. It is also important to note that most people will refer to the unit as a drive, no matter its function. Most drives also fall into both categories; for example a drive that reads and writes CDs but only reads DVDs.

User Avatar

Format all other drives instead of that conatain operating system


Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.