Parenting and Children
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If you have full physical custody but joint legal custody can your ex have the child baptized without your permission?

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2015-07-16 19:27:26
2015-07-16 19:27:26

That depends on whether it is stated in your parenting agreement as to who has the right to make religious decisions. Is it addressed? Is decision making joint? If this issue is not addressed then, yes, he/she can have the child baptised. My question to you would be...why does it really matter? If you thoroughly research baptism, you will find that it doesn't mean anything unless the party being baptised is consentual to it. A parent can have a child baptised with the intention of showing the world that they intend to raise that child in that particular religion, but actual baptism potrays the acknowledgement of Jesus Christ as Lord, and symbolizes the washing away of sins. Is your child old enough to consent and agree? If not, it is simply a ceremony for the sake of your ex. If your child is old enough, let him/her make their own decision about this. It just may be the most important decision they will ever make.

โ€ข Having "joint legal custody" means neither of you can do anything medical, religious, educational, etc. without the other's permission. The only way to do this without asking is if one has SOLE legal custody.

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Related Questions


You cannot have sole custody without physical custody. If your ex has physical custody, you are the non-custodial parent.

No, not if your mother has sole physical custody. If there is a joint custody arrangement, you'd still need the cooperation of both parents to make it happen.

It depends on the law where you live and your custody order. If the father has sole legal custody (as opposed to physical custody) he would be able to make that decision without input from the mother. If legal custody is joint or the mother has sole legal custody, no he could not.

No , not usually.Don't do it without permission or you may get your Dad in trouble.

You can if the mother gives you permission. It is possible she could call the police on you for kidnapping if you remove the child without her consent.

If the parents don't have Joint Physical Custody, than no, but there is a 50 mile range limit.

If your father have visitation right or share custody she will need his permission.

If they do not have custody of the children, they cannot. If they have custody, they can apply to a court for a name change.

Not without his fathers and the courts permission.

Permission from the other parent. Yes if you are in leagule custody of the child at the time

Depends on if you have sole custody if not you are breaking the law greatly, don't do it unless you have sole custody or get sole guardians permission or a court grant to have custody for a period of time.

If the father has legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has joint legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has sole legal custody, yes.If the father has legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has joint legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has sole legal custody, yes.If the father has legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has joint legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has sole legal custody, yes.If the father has legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has joint legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has sole legal custody, yes.

That is dependent on your orders, but even if not addressed, the other parent could file an injunction for the child to be returned. It's best to get permission and to establish a visitation schedule. see link

No If by moving the party means a move within the jurisdiction of the court that mandated the custodial order, then yes, you may relocate. If the question refers to relocating outside of said jurisdiction, the primary custodial will need the written notarized permission of the non primary custodial parent and/or permission from the court.

No. Only a court can grant custody and the father will be notified so he has the opportunity to object.

For a child to be baptized, the parents have to be willing to bring up the child in the practice of the faith. So in normal circumstances the parent's permission is needed. However, in danger of death, a person can be baptized without the parent's permission. On occasion, if mothers choose not to have their children baptized, a grandmother has been known to secretly baptize. This iwas done to free the child from original sin and give them the right to heaven. However, while baptism frees one from original sin, we live in the hope that all innocent children are saved, and no longer teach "limbo" as a place wher unbaptized babies go. Normally, both parents should consent to baptism; if father has sole custody, then mother's permission is not needed.If both parents have custody and are disagreeing about baptism, the church only needs to know ( well founded hope) that at least one of the parents is willing to bring up the child as catholic. In this case the child can be baptized without the mother's consent if the father is willing, and vice versa.Unfortunately, this may create a family conflict, but the child has the right to be baptized.

Sole physical and sole legal custody? If the custody order doesn't state otherwise, most likely but that is a question best posed to an attorney or the courts before you move if you aren't sure. If you have sole physical custody but joint legal custody or the other parent has otherwise retained their right for decision making power in their child's life, no, not without the other parent's permission or a court order.

There is physical (residential) custody and legal custody. If you share legal custody with the other parent of if they have visitation rights you cannot move the children without the non-custodial parent's consent and/or court approval.There is physical (residential) custody and legal custody. If you share legal custody with the other parent of if they have visitation rights you cannot move the children without the non-custodial parent's consent and/or court approval.There is physical (residential) custody and legal custody. If you share legal custody with the other parent of if they have visitation rights you cannot move the children without the non-custodial parent's consent and/or court approval.There is physical (residential) custody and legal custody. If you share legal custody with the other parent of if they have visitation rights you cannot move the children without the non-custodial parent's consent and/or court approval.


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