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Is a GFCI breaker required for an electric pool heater?

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2009-06-08 18:37:31
2009-06-08 18:37:31

I'm not positive but, as far as I know, one is required on a 120V heater but not on a 220V heater. Even if a GFCI isn't required I would install one anyway for the safety of your family and friends. These devices do work and are well worth the cost. Call a Professional... Either a GFCI outlet or a GFCI breaker, and I think I'd use the GFCI outlet because the reset on an outlet is closer to the pool than the breaker would be. But put it far enough away from the pool that you've got to get out to reset it. I think that's code; if it's not it should be.

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No, you could use a GFCI circuit breaker instead.


Deoends on code you are governed by. In USA, a GFCI outlet or a circuit controlled by a GFCI circuit breaker would be required.


A GFCI receptacle can pass it's "protection" to other outlets wired from it. If the GFCI trips, all outlets wired from it will "trip" also. A GFCI tripping will not necessarily trip the circuit breaker in the service panel.


Not if the GFCI breaker is supplying the circuit you are wanting to put the GFCI receptacle into.


Your question is a bit vague, but let's try a two part answer. If you have a GFCI breaker in an electric panel you should only have one connection at the breaker, but the breaker will protect all devices on the circuit. If you are talking about a GFCI outlet, they are equipped to extend the GFCI protection to other non-GFCI outlets by using the proper "output" connection on the GFCI.


A GFCI receptacle can extend its protection to regular receptacles connected to the output side of the GFCI. Each actual GFCI receptacle should be directly connected to a breaker in electric panel.


A GFCI device in a breaker is intended to trip the breaker open when a ground fault is sensed in the circuit that the breaker is protecting.


GFCI = Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter.


A GFCI senses a stray current flowing to ground which indicates that there is a potential shock hazard and the GFCI "trips" and removes voltage from the circuit until the ground fault is cleared and the GFCI is reset. A GFCI can be in an outlet or it can be a breaker in the electric panel.


Not that I know of. The largest GFCI breaker I have seen is a 60 amp.


It is a Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter or GFCI. It can either be equipped in your electric panel as a GFCI breaker, or in a GFCI outlet which also lets you extend the GFCI protection to other outlets "down the line" from the GFCI outlet.


There are tow places to put a Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter. There is a GFCI breaker which would be installed in a breaker box and a GFCI outlet that can be installed anywhere. Most GFCI outlets allow you to connect regular outlets to the GFCI and those outlets will also be protected.



Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters come in two basic types. The circuit breaker in your electric panel and as an outlet. In both cases only one GFCI should protect a circuit. Have no idea what you have in mind since a GFCI is not typically defined as a switch and you only need a single GFCI to protect circuit at the rating of the GFCI.


No, they are two totally different things. A GFCI must be used within 6' of any water source, when the floor is concrete, or when the outlet is located outside or under the home. An Arc Fault breaker must be used in any bedroom, or other area you live in. Not required in kitchen, or utility room.


Yes, as long as the wire on that circuit is AWG #12 and the breaker is a 20 amp breaker. FYI, you can install a 15 amp outlet or 15 amp GFCI on a 20 amp circuit. That is perfectly fine and meets the National Electric Code.


I would NOT do that if I were you. If someone is electrocuted and local, county or state officials discover that the GFCI has been removed, you could have some serious problems in court.If a GFCI was installed, there was a good reason for it; electricians don't put one in unless it is required by code.If you INSIST on replacing the GFCI, connect the white wire that screws into the GFCI to the neutral bar in the breaker panel and disconnect the white pigtail that comes out of the GFCI, then connect the BLACK wire to the new breaker.


You need a GFCI outlet at any location that is within 6' of a water source. You also need a GFCI outlet in a room with a concrete floor, any garage, and any location outside the home or under the home in the crawl space. A GFCI outlet protects you from electrical shock near water or moisture. You can protect more than one outlet with 1 GFCI outlet. Connect the incoming power to the LINE side of the GFCI outlet and all the other outlets getting power from that outlet to the LOAD side of the GFCI outlet. That way they will all be protected by 1 GFCI. A GFCI breaker is used to protect an entire circuit and not just individual receptacles. It is often cheaper to use GFCI receptacles than a breaker, especially if "piggy-backed" such as described above. It is also more convenient to reset a GFCI receptacle than to reset a breaker. But your question is "why." From this I suspect you may be misunderstanding the difference between a breaker and GFCI protection. To keep things simple let me say that a GFCI does not work on the same principles as a standard breaker. It provides a much safer protection than a standard breaker. Even with a ground you need GFCI protection as listed above.


Yes but it's redundant and may cause unnecessary "tripping" of the circuit. The GFCI circuit breaker is intended to protect an entire receptacle circuit whereas a GFCI receptacle is designed to protect only that receptacle and any which are provided power from its load side. (downstream)


Yes as long as it is not required to be gfci protected by the electrical code. Bathrooms, outdoor receptacles, are some that are required to be of gfci type.


If it's a GFCI receptacle and the button is not resetting then change the GFCI outlet.


If the test switch is faulty then there is no convenient way to determine if the GFCI is functioning, and technically, if the test switch is faulty, then as it is a part of the GFCI, the GFCI is faulty and should be replaced.


No. Not if the GFCI is wired correctly. The neutral wire should always be cold, or at ground potential.


If your spa is connected with a GFCI circuit breaker you will not need the GFCI receptacle.


In North America they are known as a GFCI. Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter breaker.



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