answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2006-07-07 01:47:24
2006-07-07 01:47:24

everythign is worth fixing. itd probable be no good to drive even with an engine but it could be sold to a collecttor, people will buy anything these days.

001
๐Ÿฆƒ
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Related Questions


for me there is no money it how much you love your car


To remove the engine, transmission, or even change the clutch is a difficult task. They are not an easy car to work on. Unless you have a reason to choose a Fiero, I'd suggest a different car. If your still wanting to, look under the car in the trunk area, but from under the car, and not via the wheelwell. Fieros tend to rust out in that part of the frame.


You usually will want to get an estimate in order to determine if your car is worth fixing. Many times, if it is your engine, it is not going to be worth fixing.


The engine went out on my car, is it worth putting another engine. They are charging me $500 for the engine and $300 for labor. $800 total


They range from free for junkers to 15,000 for sweet restored ones Performance modified can go for over 30,000


Yes, if the car is in decent condition with a good transmission and no major engine problems.


Just the engine... it will depend on the year and if it is complete in running condition or needs rebuilt.



I fling them away, not worth fixing.


Continue to make the payments if you value your credit score Otherwise it will be repossessed running or not and that's a big black mark on your credit


The O2 sensor is in the down tube just in front of the transmission on the drivers side. I have changed it from the top, Trust me, it's worth jacking the car up and replacing from below.


Depends on what engine it is. You can bet you have done some serious damage. Probably enough to make it not worth repairing. You will only know for sure by opening it up and looking at all parts.


In most cases the answer would have to be no. Reasons why old furnaces are not worth fixing: 1.It's not nearly as efficient as a new furnace 2.The cost of fixing it 3. Something else will probably go bad in the near future. 4.sometimes it is no longer safe to keep it running


go to manheimgold.com and figure it out.


There is no way of knowing that


I hang out in a couple of Sunfire groups and have never heard of a V6 swap. I guess it might be "possible", but it may or may not be worth what it takes to get it done. I've wished for a long time, that Pontiac had offered a 6 cylinder engine for Sunfires.


Get on manheim gold.com and figure it out.



Of course it will be worth something. If Pontiac doesn't exist anymore, it doesn't mean that it loses its value. From my perspective, if i had some money, i would buy it instantly.


A G5 Pontic is worth around 10,459 $, but the price range is from 8200 to 1100$ depending on how old and of it is damaged or not. With a quite new G5 Pontiac should go for around 10,000$.


According to NADAGuides.com, a 1987 Pontiac Sunbird Coupe with a turbo engine has an average retail value of $2,275. That price, however, will depend on a number of factors, including the number of miles on the odometer, the condition of the body and the condition of the components, including the turbocharger.


"I believe it is worth fixing if the motor didn't smoke. However, I would do a compression check before fixing to check for bent intake or exhaust valves before fixing. The timing chain and gear set is around 60.00 and it is a 505 hour job to do the timing chain and gears and access is limited to the area where these repairs are to be made. If the general appearance of the car inside and out is good and the motor didn't smoke, tick or knock prior and compression is ok it is still worth fixing in my opinion.


technically yes, it will fit. Whether or not it's worth the hassle is up to you.


That depends on who did the engine and how thorough they were.


Why would you get rid of anything? If it no longer works and isn't worth fixing or if you no longer have a use for it.



Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.