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Answered 2012-08-04 23:38:02

Yes. Normally up to 10% of coverage c (Contents) are covered off premises.

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When the general contractor makes a threat to a homeowner, about selling all the homeowners personal property, that the contractors have in storage. And the contractor has not finished the repairs on the homeowner's house. Can the contractor sell their property?


In my opinion yes. As long as your personal property is stored in a location that is not a residence or could be considered a residence.


Your personal property is covered while it is in a storage facility for the perils listed in the policy. A theft loss at the facility may have limitations of coverage in some policies. Refer to your homowners policy; Coverage C-Personal Property, it is easy and fun reading!


Yes. You CAN retreive personal property (and your tag) from an impounded vehicle. There should be no charge for the storage of the property, however you will need proof of ownership of the vehicle. Repossessions are treated differently and you would most likely incur storage charges for your personal property. (Florida)


If you get the car back you have to pay storage, if there was even a pair of sunglasses inside the car they can charge you for property.


If that property (the underground storage tanks) is used in the business to make money and you are the owner of the business, then yes. I'm not a lawyer so this is only my opinion after reading the definition of business personal property.


My sister stored her personal property in my storage house for 9 months. I kept asking her to come and get it she never did. I took her property out and place it in my garage. She never did come and get it, she said her lawyer told her not to touch it.


You'll need to contact the bank that holds the loan. They will give you contact information for the repo agent, who is required by law to make your personal property available for you. There is generally a small storage fee that you'll need to pay when retrieving personal property, which is allowed by law, and compensates the agent for inventorying and storing the property.


No . Not unless the owner agreed in writing to pay storage fees. You can check the laws for abandoned property in your state. You may find that you have the right to dispose of the property after six years of free storage.No . Not unless the owner agreed in writing to pay storage fees. You can check the laws for abandoned property in your state. You may find that you have the right to dispose of the property after six years of free storage.No . Not unless the owner agreed in writing to pay storage fees. You can check the laws for abandoned property in your state. You may find that you have the right to dispose of the property after six years of free storage.No . Not unless the owner agreed in writing to pay storage fees. You can check the laws for abandoned property in your state. You may find that you have the right to dispose of the property after six years of free storage.


Just the motorhome. Any personal property inside the motorhome remains yours, and they may not take it. In most states, however, they may charge a storage fee for personal property which was removed from the repossessed vehicle.


They must return personal belongings as long as you pick them up in a timely manner and since it has been repo'd they can't charge you anything for storage, its not your car anymore


Below is a quote from INDIANA statutes:IC 32-31-4-2Liability; abandoned property; court order allowing removal by landlordSec. 2. (a) A landlord has no liability for loss or damage to a tenant's personal property if the tenant's personal property has been abandoned by the tenant.(b) For purposes of this section, a tenant's personal property is considered abandoned if a reasonable person would conclude that the tenant has vacated the premises and has surrendered possession of the personal property.(c) An oral or a written rental agreement may not define abandonment differently than is provided in subsection (b).(d) If a landlord is awarded possession of a dwelling unit by a court under IC 32-30-2, the landlord may seek an order from the court allowing removal of a tenant's personal property.(e) If the tenant fails to remove the tenant's personal property before the date specified in the court's order issued under subsection (d), the landlord may remove the tenant's personal property in accordance with the order and deliver the personal property to a warehouseman under section 3 of this chapter or to a storage facility approved by the court.As added by P.L.2-2002, SEC.16. Amended by P.L.115-2007, SEC.2.See below link for full statute:


Yes. You have a percentage of your contents coverage covered off premises. Traveling your items will be covered; in storage; a child in college and their property in a dorm room; and many other instances.


You would have to check your state's laws on the subject, but it probably is. If they were storing and safeguarding the property for you they are probably eligible to charge something for it.


same as anywhere else. they CANT keep it, but may charge you a fee for inventory and storage.


You can, but there are complicated rules. For example, in California you can charge a storage fee for vehicles left on your property but only after send the owner a registered letter explaining that the vehicle is on your property and that it is acruing storage charges.


Yes. The trailer is considered personal property, much like that rod and real you left in the boat, or the motor that was not part of the loan. You will be permitted to claim your personal property for thirty days after the boat is repossessed. You will be charged for the storage of it though.


The answer to your question depends on your state's laws. To avoid costly legal claims initiated by your former tenant, I highly recommend that you contact a landlord-tenant law attorney in your area. A landlord's advocacy group could also tell you what your local laws are on storage of abandoned property.


Rental real estate is any property for which the owner receives payment by another for use or occupation of the property. It can be commercial, storage, industrial, residential or vacation property.Rental real estate is any property for which the owner receives payment by another for use or occupation of the property. It can be commercial, storage, industrial, residential or vacation property.Rental real estate is any property for which the owner receives payment by another for use or occupation of the property. It can be commercial, storage, industrial, residential or vacation property.Rental real estate is any property for which the owner receives payment by another for use or occupation of the property. It can be commercial, storage, industrial, residential or vacation property.


This will depend on your state law: in some states the landlord is allowed to keep your property; in others they must put it in storage; while in others they must put it on the curbside


Personal responsibility obliges a soldier to exercise reasonable and prudent actions to properly care for and provide proper custody and safekeeping for property in storage awaiting issue.


After your vehicle has been repossessed, the repossessing company must contact you (often via the creditor) to notify you where your personal property can be recovered. Repossession agents are required to keep the property for thirty days to allow you to recover it, but they will charge you a storage fee, and pretty much every one will require that fee be paid before they surrender your personal property. Regarding an agent of yours being permitted to recover your personal property, it is possible, but may be difficult.


storage is when your personal things are being held safely and in good care.


Yes. Any property left in the vehicle when it was repossessed is additional property, not part of the repossession. As private property, the repossession company is liable to inventory the porperty and store it so that it may be recovered. State laws vary a bit, but the standard storage limit is thirty days. During this time they may assess a storage fee. You, the property owner must pay this fee to recover your property. Property that is not recovered in the time alloted by law may be discarded as the company sees fit.


Read your governing documents to identify which definition applies to your particular locker or storage area. There is no standard.