Brake Pads and Rotors
Chevy Blazer S-10
Honda Civic SI

Need tips on doing front and rear brake pad change on a 2002 suburban 4wd 2500 - do the front calipers have torx?

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2008-01-19 06:16:35
2008-01-19 06:16:35

The front calipers have metric bolt heads, however the rear has Torx holding the caliper together and metric bolt head holding the caliper to the axle. The front was relatively easy given a socket wrench with the right lengthed handle or breaker bar that fits into the area you are working (hint: loosen the bolt holding the caliper together first in order to use the leverage of the vehicle to break it loose, then go after the bolt holding the caliper to the spindle). Have an upside down bucket ready to place the caliper without damaging the brake line. Remove the old pads and compress the 2 cylinders with a large C-clamp and block of wood. Insert new pads and rethread bolts to hold the caliper together. Put new rotor in place. Remount calipers on spindle. The rear is another story. Barely any clearance between the Torx head and the spring pack, and a little more space, but not enought to fit a socket wrench between the metric bolt head and the spring pack. I didn't even try to remove the Torx while the caliper was still mounted on the axle, so I went for the metric head bolt to remove the caliper from the axle. I had to use a box end wrench (use the closed side or you will likely round over the bolt head) and an appropriate sized breaker bar (wear gloves because there is not much clearance and you will bust up your hands). Using the boxed end wrench definity took longer to get the bolts loose (they fight you all the way), as you have to keep removing and placing it back on the head, but it works (make sure you have an 18MM boxed end wrench). The downside in removing the caliper from the axle is that the Torx has proven impossible to remove with the caliper removed from the axle. The more it is fiddled with while the brake line is attached, the more chance to tear the break line or strip the Torx. Remove the brake line and place a securely rubberbanded baggy to it in order to catch the leakage. This will allow for the caliper to be taken to a place where it can be secured enough to take the Torx bolts out without damaging them (make sure you have a T55 Torx socket...sold by itself in Sears hardware automotive section...bobo brand). Bolt the caliper back together with pads installed before remounting to the axle. Put new rotor in place. The downside in removing the brake line is that I will have to hook it back up. Remount caliper on axle. bleed the lines to ensure no air bubbles, and recheck the fluid level in the reservoir. Have fun!!!

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