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Brake Pads and Rotors

The brake pads and rotors are important parts of a vehicle’s braking system. When an automobile brakes, the brake clamps on the rotor to slow the speed of the vehicle.

7,151 Questions
Brake Pads and Rotors
Mercury Sable
Honda Accord LX

How do you change rear brakes and compress piston on a Mercury Sable?

See "Related Links" below, for Autozone's on-line repair manual for 1996-1999 Taurus & Sable rear brake repair instructions.

Invaluable resource - for free! Okay, I did my disc brakes yesterday and offer the following: * The first 2 steps in the Autozone steps are about disconnecting the emergency brake cable - this is not necessary! On the driver's side, you might want to remove the cable clamp holding the cable up against the frame. * NOTE: the piston needs to rotate as it is compressed!There are notches in the face of the piston that are intended to help create both rotation and inward pressure.

Get a caliper piston compression tool! Many parts stores offer them for loan or rent. You definitely want one! (I fabricated my own from plumbing parts - didn't have a car available to go back to the parts store) * To compress the piston, follow these steps- : :# Remove the caliper and bracket :# Remove the rotor :# Put the bracket and caliper back on (don't bother really tightening the bolts) :# Put a c-clamp on that holds the caliper to the bracket - one end over the one of the caliper mounting bolts. : Now you can put lots of pressure up against the piston with the compression tool with both hands! Much easier. * Make sure the slide bolts on the caliper are moving freely. One of mine was rusted in place - took lots of heat, penetrating oil and patience to get it loose. : NOTE - be sure to peel off the rubber boot before you fire up the propane torch! : Wire brush the bolt and re-grease the whole thing under the rubber boot. * I found rotors for only $18 each and just replaced both. I haven't had rotors turned/re-surfaced in years. Easier to just put new ones on. * I love ceramic brake pads! I really appreciate the total lack of brake dust all over my wheels! Typically around $40-45, so their not much more than the metallics. I replaced the brake pads on my mom's 93 Taurus and the rear pads required a special tool to collapse the caliper. My brother is a technician for Ford and I used his tool that cost 75 dollars.

You cant use a C clamp - it won't work.

The trick is that the piston has to rotate and essentially screw itself back into the caliper.

There are two notches in the face of the piston that a 'special' tool fits into to help you rotate it while pushing in.

Late one Sunday afternoon was when I discovered this - no stores to get the 'right' tool from. I actually fabricated one out of a piece of galvanized pipe connector -and lots of grinding. Crude, but functional.

Many parts stores have a tool loaner option. You may even find this tool at affordable prices if you check around. You need a special tool available for rent at some parts stores. They should be able to tell you how to use it. The trick is that the piston has to rotate and essentially screw itself back into the caliper.

There are two notches in the face of the piston that a 'special' tool fits into to help you rotate it while pushing in.

Late one Sunday afternoon was when I discovered this - no stores to get the 'right' tool from. I actually fabricated one out of a piece of galvanized pipe connector -and lots of grinding. Crude, but functional. Rear disc brakes on Sables are more complicated then front brakes. If the rear brake unit has the parking brake attached to the side with a circular spring, then the rear brakes cannot be pressed back into place like the front ones. There is a brake tool needed to rotate the cylinder back into place. if your caliper piston is not depressing easily, it may be siezed. this is common in most vehicles with rear disc brakes Should I be depressing the piston as I am turning clockwise? Hal This is one of the worst, most arm wrenching jobs going. You need a gold 'cube' brake tool, available from most auto supply stores. You use a ratchet to hold the tool and compress the piston as you twist. It can take hours - as the cube will continually slip off (watch your hands). Supposedly if you open the bleeder valve it will just twist right in, spewing brake fluid everywhere. Never tried that. I did it once, and on the other side, I just simply replaced the caliper to avoid the pain and suffering. Use a big C-clamp. This will force fluid back up into the reservoir. Some will spill out if you have recently filled it. Clean up ASAP. If you are trying to change rear disc brakes on a 93 mercury sable, you will need a caliper removal tool set. You will find a small square type tool at auto parts stores that cost around $10 but these will not fit properly when trying to relieve the pressure so DO NOT purchase for a 1993 - the slots are not wide enough. Go to an auto parts store that offers a tool loan program (I went to A.Z.) and ask for the disc caliper removal set - you will have to leave a deposit. The one I got came in a red plastic case and there were around 6 or so round metal discs inside, each with differing widths for different models, a clamp used to turn the metal discs and a piece of metal shaped the same way as the brake pads. I cannot remember exactly how they worked now but once you get the CORRECT tool you should understand from there. you have to turn the piston clockwise into the caliper. you can buy this cube-thing or use needle nose pliers.

Answer

They are threaded to operate emeergency brake need special tool (available at Sears or auto parts) not expensive

BFG is correct...They twist back in. The tool looks like a square box with little bumps in different places for different cars and has a square hole in the middle for your extenion and ratchet.




you need what is normally called a 'rear disk break calaper tool' which is used to turn the calaper piston back into the calaper, it is turned in like a bolt. you can either get the ford specific tool or try to find a general purpose tool designed for many makes and models. i have found the generic one to be cheaper and it did do the trick, they can be tricky to reset back into the calaper and it does help if you crack the bleader screw (keep a can ready for the old fluid) and make sure you bleed the breaks afterwards
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HDTV
Brake Pads and Rotors
Wheel Alignment and Balancing

Who has the best package deal on tires?

Depends on application: off-road, touring, mud & sleet, snow, etc.: America's Tire, or Discount Tires

Why? Because the replacement warranty and availability is one of the best if not theee best. Just 1 person's opinion who use to work in the auto industry & owned many different vehicles from small cars to off-road 4WDs. Good luck!

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Brake Pads and Rotors

How often do you need to change brake pads or rotors on a car?

Brake Pads: Depends on the warranted life of the pads already on your car. If you have 10,000-mile brake pads, you need to replace them every 10,000 miles. However, if you hear a grinding noise coming from your wheels, regardless of the mileage on your pads, you probably need to replace the pads. If you haven't put that many miles on your pads, you can probably get free replacements pads from the store that sold you the pads or the garage that installed them. (Be aware that "lifetime" brake pads don't really last forever. Auto parts manufacturers only call them that because 1) they DO last a very long time, 2) most car owners will sell or junk their cars long before the pads need to be changed and the warrantee does not effectively transfer to the new owner, and 3) the price of the original lifetime pads is high enough that, in the few cases where customers try to make a claim on the warrantee, the auto parts store is still coming out ahead. So, even if you have lifetime brake pads, you need to check them if you start hearing that grinding noise.) Rotors: The only time you should have to replace your rotors is if you damage them because of driving for an extended period with completely worn-down brake pads. The "grinding noise" I mentioned before is the sound of the screws in the base of brake pads (which are completely worn down) grinding a groove in your rotors. Ideally, you should replace your brake pads before you hear this noise. But sometimes this is not feasible. However, once you hear the noise, the sooner you can get the pads replaced, the less likely it is that you will have to replace the rotors. But, even if you drive, say, 1,000 miles like that, there is a chance that the rotors can be "turned". This means that the garage will grind down the entire surface of the rotors until it is even with the bottom of the groove. However, this is nearly as expensive as installing new rotors. This is what I would do. If you bought your car new, it probably came with 30-40,000-mile brake pads. If you bought it used, you don't have a clue what the warranty on the pads is, nor how much of that has been used up. Either way, just be on the lookout for that grinding noise. You'll know it when you hear it. When you hear it, you don't have to cancel your plans for that day and go straight to the garage or auto parts store (unless maybe your plans for that day involve driving 500 miles or more). But you'll want to replace them within a week or so. Since we're talking about what I would do, you can save a whole bunch of money replacing the pads yourself. The best "lifetime" brake pads you can buy are less than $50 ($100 for both front wheels), while most garages will charge you $300 for changing both front brake pads, and stick you with the cheap 10,000-mile pads. And it isn't really that hard to do. You need a few tools that might not already be in your toolbox, and that will cost you a few more bucks, but you only have to buy those tools once. But even if you had to buy them every time you changed your own brake pads, it's still a lot cheaper than paying a garage to do it for you. Another advantage to changing your own pads is that some garages will tell you that you need to replace the rotors, when you really don't. Even if you ground a deep groove in your rotors, it is only a narrow (1/4 inch wide groove, and the vast majority of the surface of your rotors is still good (though it probably won't pass a safety inspection). The garage will quote some "state law" that "forbids" them replacing the brake pads unless they also replace the rotors, which will run you another $400 on top of the $300 for replacing the pads. And if you say no, they're still going to charge you $100-200 just for taking the time to look at it, and you got nothing for your money. But if you replace the pads yourself, you can make your own call about the rotors. And if you decide the rotors do need to be replaced, you can do that yourself too, for about $200 for both front wheels. The thing is, whether you're doing it yourself or paying a garage to do it, don't try to anticipate when the pads are almost worn out. Just wait for the grinding sound, and when you hear it, change them, or get them changed, soon. Sure, if you do this enough, you're going to have to replace your rotors eventually. But if you get high-mileage pads, this will only happen every 30,000 miles or so, and over the life of your car, you will have much less damage to your rotors. But keep an eye on your calipers, especially as your vehicle gets older. Calipers are the brackets that hold the brake pads and push them against the rotor when you hit the brakes. Calipers use hydraulic piston to push the pads toward the rotors. Over time, these pistons can become "sticky", so that they don't pull back when you let off the brake. If this happens, while driving you will feel a slight pull to the side where the calipers are stuck, and may hear a constant brake rubbing noise, but not a grinding noise, at least not until the pads are completely worn down. But that's the thing. If your calipers are sticky, you will go through a pair of pads very quickly. And if you replace the pads on one side, you MUST replace the pads on the other side at the same time, even if they are not nearly as worn as the others. So, if your calipers are sticking, get them fixed pronto. Unfortunately, replacing calipers is not quite as easy as replacing brake pads and rotors. When you replace the calipers, you have to break the pressure seal on your brake fluid, which means, first, you're going to have brake fluid all over the place, and second, you're going to have to re-fill your brake fluid reservoir. It also means that the connections you are loosening will be very, very tight, and may require special tools to loosen. Likewise, when you reconnect everything, you're going to have to get the connections very, very tight again, to prevent leaks. But, even with all the special tools and replacement brake fluid you're going to have to buy, it's still cheaper than letting a garage do it for you ($300 doing it yourself, $200-250 if you use "rebuilt" calipers vs $600-700 at the garage), so think about it. If you insist on getting your brake work done by a garage, I want to warn you of one scam in particular. Some places might try to sell you a "lifetime brake job", meaning that, if you let them replace EVERY component of your brake system, for the standard cost, then pay an additional fee on top of that, they will warrantee the whole system for as long as you own the car. That's free diagnostics, free pads, free calipers, free rotors, free brake lines, free brake fluid, even free labor, for as long as you own the car. Sounds like a great deal, even at $1000. But it's a scam! Firestone had a "lifetime alignment" deal, and my wife signed up for it. But every time she brought the car in for service on that '"lifetime alignment" deal, they managed to find something else wrong that was not covered by the deal, but was intimately related to the alignment system so that (and here's where the "state law" comes in again) they couldn't do anything to the alignment unless they fixed this other thing first. If anyone offers you a "lifetime brake job", you can bet they will pull the same stunt every time you bring your car in for service.

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Brake Pads and Rotors

What is braking distance composed of?

Braking distance is usually measured by how fast you can stop at 60mph, 60-0, the make of a car is the factor of the stopping distance, each car varies. Your car can have disc brakes or drum brakes or both. Disc brakes are more effective than drum brakes.

But braking distance is usually showed by how many feet it takes to stop from 60mph

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Brake Pads and Rotors
Menstruation

How do you know when your pad is full?

Whenever your pad feels heavy. Check it every time you

go to the restroom.

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Brake Pads and Rotors

What causes brake calipers to stick on a pt cruiser?

not lubricating your slide pins when you replace your brakes

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Brake Pads and Rotors
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable

How do you change rear brake shoes and drums on a Ford Taurus - Mercury Sable?

  • Remove the axle nut seal cap.
  • Remove the axle nut with socket and wrench
  • Brake drum should come off
  • ** If tight, then remove the brake adjuster dust cover on the inside of the brake drum housing
    • loosen the adjuster with special tool purchase for this activity at any major auto parts store.

Re-install drum in reverse of explanation

To get started on changing rear drum brakes on a 1996-1999 Taurus / Sable, check out Autozone's online Chilton's Repair Manual linked below.

NOTE: Autozone now requires free registration to access the repair guides. More than worth the extra effort for these photo/illustrated instructions.

Getting the drum off

There is no nut holding the rear brake drum on. The drum is simply held on by factory clips and the wheel itself.

To remove the drum, remove the wheel. There may or may not be factory clips on 3 of the lugs / studs, these hold the drum on at the factory and must be removed - if they exist. Twist off with pliers, if they get wrecked, they aren't needed for re-assembly.

Usually the drum will then pull off with a bit of side to side wrangling. If you can hear the brakes rubbing on the drum when turned, or the drum won't come all the way off (there may be a ridge on outer edge of inner drum) you'll have to turn the brake adjuster so the brake shoes are no longer in contact with the drum. On the back of the backing plate, above the axle, there is a rubber plug that a brake spoon can be inserted and turn the shoe adjuster until the shoes no longer touch the drum.

Also, sometimes the center of the drum rusts to the hub so a few whacks with a heavy hammer around the center of the drum to make sure it's loose can't hurt, don't over do it though.

Jack and secure vehicle Remove wheels Make sure Emergency brake is released Remove and discard clips if any on studs Drums should come right off, if not lubricate center hub with WD-40 or similar product and sometimes hitting them with a hammer will loosen them sufficiently to remove If they are really frozen due do either "E" brake dragging or just time, you may have to get a puller to get them off, but drums will probably have to be replaced if this technique is used.

See "Related Links" & Questions for additional information on Taurus brakes.

Remove tire. Remove the clips that are on the lug bolts at the drum. If you break them that is okay they are exactly necessary. The drum should come off. If not then open up the auto-adjuster access in the back of the drum. If is under a rubber rectangular piece. Pull this out. Now use a flat headed screw driver to rotate the adjusting screw up or down. (I never can remember which way is which.) This will back the brake shoes off of the drum so that you can remove it. It doesn't take much.

  • Remove the axle nut seal cap.
  • Remove the axle nut with socket and wrench
  • Brake drum should come off
  • ** If tight, then remove the brake adjuster dust cover on the inside of the brake drum housing
    • loosen the adjuster with special tool purchase for this activity at any major auto parts store.

Re-install drum in reverse of explanation

To get started on changing rear drum brakes on a 1996-1999 Taurus / Sable, check out Autozone's online Chilton's Repair Manual linked below.

Jack and secure vehicle Remove wheels Make sure Emergency brake is released Remove and discard clips if any on studs Drums should come right off, if not lubricate center hub with WD-40 or similar product and sometimes hitting them with a hammer will loosen them sufficiently to remove If they are really frozen due do either "E" brake dragging or just time, you may have to get a puller to get them off, but drums will probably have to be replaced if this technique is used.

See "Related Links" & Questions for additional information on Taurus / Sable brakes.

Removing the (stuck) drumCheck the face of the drum to make sure there is not some sort of fastener holding it on. Otherwise, take a hammer or mallet and lightly tap the sides of the drum while pulling on it. If that doesn't work, you may have to release some of tension on the shoes by turning an adjustment wheel that should be accessible from the back side of the assembly. There should be an oblong-shaped slot in the backing plate where you can stick a screwdriver in to turn the adjusting wheel. I have never owned this type of vehicle, but the information comes from my work on vehicles I have owned in the past. Good luck! Getting the drum off

There is no nut holding the rear brake drum on. The drum is simply held on by factory clips and the wheel itself.

To remove the drum, remove the wheel. There may or may not be factory clips on 3 of the lugs / studs, these hold the drum on at the factory and must be removed - if they exist. Twist off with pliers, if they get wrecked, they aren't needed for re-assembly.

Usually the drum will then pull off with a bit of side to side wrangling. If you can hear the brakes rubbing on the drum when turned, or the drum won't come all the way off (there may be a ridge on outer edge of inner drum) you'll have to turn the brake adjuster so the brake shoes are no longer in contact with the drum. On the back of the backing plate, above the axle, there is a rubber plug that a brake spoon can be inserted and turn the shoe adjuster until the shoes no longer touch the drum.

Also, sometimes the center of the drum rusts to the hub so a few whacks with a heavy hammer around the center of the drum to make sure it's loose can't hurt, don't over do it though.

hello I have a 1993 Ford Taurus wagon and the rear drum brakes are similar on most model fords except for the size of shoes and drums and most auto parts stores computer can look up the right size by year and model but bring old parts to compare to make sure to avoid problems,

To remove the old drums first jack car on safe location ,then remove lug nuts, tires. then spray some liquid wrench or wd40 solvent on rusted studs so they sink around the stud drum area holes, let sit for a few minutes and then get a hammer and bank around the drum mildly all the way around and then bank mildly between the studs flat on the drum all the way around. This will loosen the rust and make it easier to get the drums off gently pry the drums off with screwdrivers evenly until the drum is worked off the old shoes. on some flood or nothern cars with water damage a lot of banging may be the key to removing drums. ,

once on the inside of brake area , i first remove the upper cross spring near the adjusters and let it hang and then remove the two side retainer springs and pins that hold the brake pads. THen i can pull the whole assembly over the axel out wards and then on the back of the emergecy brake lever just remove the U shaped retaining clip off the pin and lay the brakes on the ground . Clean the backing plate with a small brush and parts cleaner to remove all comtaminates . Clean off the adjustor for reuse. Reassembly is using a new spring kit match the brake shoes and springs up like the ones that came off , after putting on the new clip on the emergcy brake lever to the brake shoe, fit the shoes in place and relace the two sping and pins that hold the brakes shoes in place , then just make sure the adjustor and sping across it are replaced just like it was removed in the begining. If the drum is damaged, relace it as any scratches will eat of the brakes and make it unsafe . Fit the drums on the shoes and if loose remove and adjust the adjustor out or in until the drum fits without play or binding. you can gage when you are close . Repeate the same for the other side. When you are done check your brake fluid level and drive around going into reverse and backing up a 20 or so feet at a time and then applying brakes to evenly adjust the back brakes with the self adjustors . You are now a lot safer with a strong brake job. Most folks only do the front brake pads so This will make all four brakes work and last a lot longer and be a lot safer for the life of the car. Enjoy you Job it pays off in the time ahead to invist the time now . Thanks The Rocknrollman

See "Related Links" & Questions for additional information on Taurus brakes.

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Brake Pads and Rotors

Why would your left front brake lock up?

bad proportioning valve, stuck caliper or a restricted brake hose or line. i would check the sliding pins to the caliper first

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Brake Pads and Rotors
Chevy Silverado
Chevy Tahoe
Pontiac Sunfire

How do you bleed the brakes on a 1999 sun fire?

Alright first things first. Jack up the vehicle and take off tire. Go ahead and place tire under car in case jack slips. On the front brakes the bleeder is located behind the rotor toward the front of the car. In this case the 99 sunfire's bleeder is I believe a 10 mm and is hex (meaning six sided). Go ahead and get a friend or what not into the drivers seat. You will loosen the bleeder and tell them to press the brake all the way to the floor. You should see a strong burst of brake fluid. but if its bubbly one of two things are wrong. Either A you just have air in the line (bleedable) or B you have a whole in one of your brake lines.

Once the fluid has stopped coming out in a stream, you tighten the bleeder and tell your friend to let up. Repeat process till air is out or brake is tight enough.

----Da Python

235236237
Brake Pads and Rotors

Who makes best brake rotors?

Tarox.

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Brake Pads and Rotors
Mercedes-Benz C-Class
VW Golf

What is the minimum brake pad thickness on a vw golf?

11mm according to Bentley Manual

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Ford Expedition XLT
Brake Pads and Rotors
Ford F-150

How do you replace 2002 ford f150 brake rotors?

How to Install Front Brake Pads

Check related link below...

_______________________

Removing Front & Rear Rotors


I remove my Front & Rear Rotors out of my 1998 Ford Expedition XLT.
I rented a 3 Jaw Puller from Auto Zone and a bottle of PB Blaster and a sledge hammer it only took about one hour or less to take both off...
The way I removed the Front & Rear Rotors was ...
1. I put lots of PB Blaster in the back and the front of the rotors to be removed.
2. I put plenty of tension with the 3 Jaw Puller...
3. I hit the back of the rotor with the sledge hammer while rotating rotor...
And it came right off...
Hope this helps...

225226227
Brake Pads and Rotors
Ford Explorer
Dodge Ram
Ford Explorer XLT

How do you replace Brakes and Rotors on a 1991 through 1994 Ford Explorer all models?

This link has photos and steps to replace brake pads and rotors. http://www.explorerforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=122696

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Brake Pads and Rotors
Toyota Sequoia

What is the minimum thickness for a Toyota Sequoia brake pad?

I don't really measure the minimum thickness of every cars' or truck pads..... we can see thru looking in between the rims w/ flashlight. Sometimes the outer pads gets more easier to worn out or get thinner or vice versa. I usually advice my clients to get rid of it. Better than forgetting it and can cost you a lot by changing every rotors. But to tell you the truth, I changed the pads at its 1/8 of an inch.

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Brake Pads and Rotors
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable

How do you change front brakes on a Ford Taurus - Sable?

  • Remove the front tires.
  • There are two bolts holding the brake assembly together (housing and piston assembly). These are located on the back side of the assembly, about a 15 mm box wrench should do the trick. Remove these two bolts and the assembly will split into two pieces.
  • Pull up on middle section where break pads are located. Before removing old brake pads use a 6 inch "C" clamp to push brake piston back into the caliper.

    Piston extends to apply pressure to pad during operation. Piston should retract all the way back into housing. Don't be afraid to apply a little elbow grease (muscle). Remove c-clamp.

  • Once fully retracted replace brake pad with new pads. Pads are idiot-proof and will only go in one way so you can?t screw these up.
  • Push piston assembly (with new pads) back onto housing assembly. This should be a snug fit.
  • Replace two mounting bolts.
  • Sit in driver?s seat and press break peddle a couple times till it comes back up and is hard. It will first depress all the way to the floor.
  • Check master cylinder located in engine compartment, located in the back right side by fire wall. Replace fluid as needed with DOT 3 fluid. Approximate repair time is 20 ? 30 minutes.
Remove wheels Re-install 2 lug nuts to hold rotor in place Remove caliper mounting bolts Slide caliper off rotor Use a "c" clamp to fully retract piston into caliper body Replace inner and outer pads Re-install caliper PUMP BRAKE PEDAL TO SET PADS AGAINST ROTOR PRIOR TO MOVING VEHICLE

The most important thing to have other than the pads, rotors, and calipers. Is to be sure to have a t40 torque bit. You will bet nowhere without it. That tool is what you need to remove the pins that hold the caliper in.

Brake pads are pretty much the same on any car. Take the wheel off, remove the brake caliper, remove the pads, clamp the piston back into place so that the new pads will fit on the rotor, place the new pads on, put the caliper back onto the rotor, put the wheel back on, and voila! New brakes.

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Brake Pads and Rotors
Ford Explorer
Ford Trucks and SUVs

How do you replace Brakes and Rotors on a 1995 through 2001 Ford Explorer all models?

How to replace the front brake pads on a 1995 through 2001 Ford ExplorerRemove the two bolts on either side of the brake hose with the rubber boots. Do not remove the four bolts where the axle ties in. The two bolts to be removed require a 10mm socket/wrench. Loosen the pads from the caliper. Replace How to replace the rear brake pads on a 1995 through 2001 Ford ExplorerThe system utilizes a drum-in-hat type rear brake rotor. The integral drum allows the use of a drum-and-shoe type parking brake system. All other components are similar to their front disc brake components

Remove the two bolts on either side of the brake hose with the rubber boots. Do not remove the four bolts where the axle ties in. The two bolts to be removed require a 10mm socket/wrench. Loosen the pads from the caliper

Rotor RemovalIn order to take the rotors off (replace with new or have them machined), it is best to loosen the emergency brake shoes. To do this, behind the rotors, in the back there is a rubber plug, remove that and you can use a screw driver to engage the teeth of the adjusting screw, turn it clockwise to loosen, usually 10-20 teeth. Usually this means turn it downward. After this, it may still be difficult to get the rotors off without tapping them. Use a rubber mallet and hit them from behind. Before really whacking the rotor, make sure you have loosened the adjusting screw enough. It may take heavy swings of the rubber hammer to do this. It will eventually break loose. Parking BrakeYou might want to check the parking brake while you are here.

To remove:

  • Remove the rear disc brake rotor.
  • Remove the outboard return spring.
  • Remove the adjusting screw spring.
  • Remove the rear brake shoe hold-down spring and pin.
  • Remove the brake shoe adjusting screw and nut.
  • Remove the front brake shoe hold-down spring and pin.
  • Remove both parking brake shoes and the inboard return spring.
  • Check the parking brake lever for excessive wear and replace as necessary.

To install:

  • Position the front parking brake shoe to the backing plate and install the hold-down pin and spring.
  • Install the rear parking brake shoe with the inboard return spring.
  • Position the brake shoe adjuster screw and nut on the shoes and install the rear shoe hold-down pin and spring.
  • Install the brake shoe adjuster spring.
  • Install the outboard return spring.
  • Adjust the parking brake shoes and install the rotor, caliper and wheel.
  • Lower the vehicle and tighten the wheel lug nuts to 100 ft. lbs. (135 Nm).

ADJUSTMENT

  • Measure the inside of the drum portion of the rear brake rotor
  • Remove the rear disc brake rotor.
  • Using Brake Adjustment Gauge D81L-1103-A or equivalent, measure the inside diameter of the drum portion of the rear disc brake rotor.
  • Subtract 0.020 in. (0.508mm) from the first measurement, adjust the brake shoes to that size
  • Adjust the parking brake adjuster screw until the outside diameter of the parking brake shoes measures 0.020 in. (0.508mm) less than the drum measurement.
  • Install the rear disc brake rotor.
ReassemblyReassembly is easy. Put new or machined rotors back on by sliding them over the lugs (they should slide on easily.) Loosen bleeder valve (having a catch bottle handy is good). Push calipers in slowly (using a c-clamp or large channel lock pliers), close bleeder valve. Put on pads. Lubricate metal clips with small amount of anti-seize.

Re-adjust the emergency brake by turning the opposite direction from loosening.

Refill the brake master cylinder

Thats a very difficult task so I would advise you to let a certified technician do the job because it is kind of complicated and can cause damage if not fitted correctly.

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Brake Pads and Rotors
Ford Windstar
Ford Windstar GL
Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer

How do you change front disc brakes on a Ford Windstar?

REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Front

1. Remove the brake master cylinder reservoir cap. Siphon and recycle approximately half the fluid from the reservoir.

2. Raise and support the vehicle safely.

3. Remove the wheels.

4. Remove the disc brake caliper guide pins.Torx bolt 40 or 45 (can't remember which)

It is not necessary to disconnect the hydraulic lines.

5. Lift the disc brake caliper from the anchor plate.

6. Position the disc brake caliper out of the way by suspending with a wire.

7. Remove the brake pads from the anchor plate.

To install:

8. Inspect the rotor surfaces for scoring or buildup of lining material. Minor imperfections do not require machining. Hand sand the glaze from the rotor using 150 grit aluminum oxide sand paper.

9. Use a C-clamp and wooden block to seat the disc brake caliper hydraulic piston in its bore, as illustrated. This must be done to provide clearance for the disc brake caliper to fit over the front rotor during installation.

10. Remove all built-up rust from the inside of the brake caliper pad contact area.

11. Install the brake pads, with the clip on insulators, into the front brake caliper anchor plate.

12. Install the disc brake caliper onto the anchor plate.

13. Install the disc brake caliper guide pins and tighten to 23-38 ft. lbs. (31-38 Nm).

Failure to tighten the lug nuts to the proper torque in a star pattern may result in damage to the brake rotor.

14. Install the wheel and tighten lug nuts to 83-112 ft. lbs. (113-153 Nm).

15. Lower the vehicle.

16. Pump the brake pedal to seat the brake pads.

Answer to replacing front brake padsThe unspoken crime of the automotive industry is the ease at replacing brake pads. Each year, people spend millions of dollars paying for a service that they can easily do by themselves. It is as easy as changing your oil. It is very easy to change the front disc brakes on a Ford Windstar '03. I have an 03 Limited. First, remove the wheel. Then, loosen the bottom bolt that holds the caliper in place. Swing the caliper up! Next, remove the brake pads by pulling them from the disc. Then, use a caliper tool to reset it. Next, spread the break pad lubricant on the brake pad and the caliper; this will lessen/eliminate noise when the brakes are applied. Lower the caliper onto the new brake pads - the most difficult part in my opinion - and secure the bolt. YOU ARE DONE! It's a good idea to secure your new brake pads by making short stops and pushing the brake pedal down as far as it will go. You've just saved yourself at least $100 bucks!

The front rotors have four to five Allen headed retaining bolts near the center of the hub(around the hub). These have to be carefully removed as to not damage or strip the heads. I suggest spraying with some liquid wrench before attempting to unscrew. Remember, right to tight, left to loose.

How to Install Front Brake Pads

Check Related links below.

There is actually a video on how to install front brake pads.

220221222
Brake Pads and Rotors
Pontiac Sunbird
VW Polo
Volvo S60

How do you change the brake pads on an '88 Pontiac Sunbird?

1st. If you intend to do any work on this car at all you need tools and a good repair manual. Spend the $20.00 bucks for a manual at autozone and read read read.

There are several things to consider

Rotors need replaced?...(can be turned?)Pads?Fluid and what type?Proportioning valve problems?Spongy brakes? need new rubber lines?Vac boost working correctly?Bad calipers need rebuild?leaking fluid?bad leaking brake master cylinder?

If this work was completed by a pro could cost well over $500.00The Pro has the book that's the only dif.Get the book and read, buy the tools you need and save yourself 200.00-300.00 bucks?

It is of my opinion never buy autozone brakes get NAPA's best Pay the extra money and stop when you need it.

211212213
Car Sounds
Brake Pads and Rotors
Chevy Blazer S-10

Why would your brakes make a terrible grinding noise?

Virtually all modern disk pads (drum or disk) have indicators bogged into the lower layer of the material. When the pad is worn close to the limit, the indicators start making a wicked scraping sound. This effect is designed for the psychological impact. If you let it get so bad that the sound changes again (subtle but the change happens), THEN you'll be scraping metal on metal and risking failure and accident.

Also it's quite a good idea to get the disks at least lightly machined, otherwise the inevitable grooving will just wear out the new pads much faster than otherwise. Only if the disk or drum is very lightly scored might you ignore this issue.

Summary: when you hear your brakes scraping after several tens of thousands, calmly book in for brake service in a timely manner.

More insight and suggestions:

Get it checked out by a competent garage. It could be pads that wore out and are cutting into the rotors, worn out shoes cutting into the drums, loose hardware occasionally getting stuck in the rear brakes, a dust shield bent in and rubbing on the rotor.

Don't waste time in getting this checked out, this sounds like a safety hazard and could lead to more expensive repairs if not attended to, or worse, an accident. I guess technically it wouldn't be an "accident" anymore!

I would also get them to check your brake calipers. I had a similar incident with my car where the clips on the brake caliper had to be changed because they broke off.

Also be sure to get the mounting hardware checked out, specifically the caliper bolts/pins. If these are worn they will cause the calipers to twist during braking. One sign that this is happening is the pads are wearing on a taper (the front edge of the pad is thicker than the rear edge or vice versa). A new brake hardware kit will usually repair this, but the caliper itself may also have to be replaced.

A stuck caliper will also cause wear of the pads, but it is usually the inside pad that gets worn out very quickly, while the outside pad (closest to the wheel) may still look nearly new. You can repair this by replacing or rebuilding the caliper. For the money, it is generally better to replace the caliper.

Most likely, it is simply worn out pads (or shoes if you have drum brakes). If they are worn out to the point of making the noise I believe that are making then you will probably need new rotors (or drums). I am not a fan of having rotors and drums turned personally. If too much is milled off of them, it can cause the piston(s) in the caliper to come out of their bore during hard braking, which will result in total braking failure of the caliper that the piston comes out of. The same principal applies to drum/wheel cylinders also. (Not a lot of fun)

179180181
Brake Pads and Rotors

Is replacing drums or rotor expensive?

They are pricey-80.00 to 120.00 ea. & they still need turned & put back together. get a 2d opinion before you replace anything. Some shops will lie to you.

195196197
Brake Pads and Rotors
Nissan Maxima
VW EuroVan

When replacing rear disk brakes on a '92 Nissan Maxima how do you compress the piston if it is locked onto the rotor and pads and cannot remove?

You have to be turning the caliper clockwise to be able to compress it. There are grooves on it that will help you do this. I used needle pliers.

            • hi there, needle plier isn't gonna work. try to buy a rear caliper pusher kit they sell at advance auto parts or from snap on or matco....good luck
AnswerIf they are locked on, your best bet is to replace the caliper since that's probably the problem in the first place. Make sure you bleed the system afterwards. Also make sure you don't have the parking brake on...i knew a friend who did that. AnswerChances are very good that you simply need to "screw" the caliper back in with a clockwise motion as seen by looking down at the notches in the same. Be carful though, if for some reason you added brake fluid to the master cylinder (as a result of brake wear), you might have the thing over flow as you return the caliper and push the piston in.
193194195
Car Sounds
Brakes and Tires
Brake Pads and Rotors

Should new brake pads squeak even when not applying the brakes?

Should they squeak? No. on a bike if they squeak you need to lower the break pads so they are inline with your wheel, if you do this and it still squeaks you need new wheels

Can they? Yes, if they are in contact with the rotor (or drum) even when the brakes are not activated. (Does the squeaking change or worsen when you do brake?) Note that this will cause both a significant loss of fuel economy and a rapid deterioration of brake pads and rotors. Look for grit or stuck calipers, and, failing that, consider the possibility of partially activated parking brake shoes (depending on your vehicle) or wheel bearing damage. You could first try applying some graphite based lubricant to the *back* of the brake shoes (never a drop on the surfaces which contact the rotor!!)-- this is sometimes supplied with the pads by the manufacturer so the clips won't squeak against the housing.

Could be a high spot on the disc or if still rust lip on outer edge rotate disc and place flat edge of screwdriver to edge of disc this will dislodge lip clean away all waste when complete ansre assemble brake caliper (all ways use Eye protection when carrying out this job )

193194195
Brake Pads and Rotors
Ford Expedition
Ford Expedition XLT

What causes a brake calipers to close but not open?

Can be several things: * rust on the pistons preventing them from retracting * rust on sliding pins locking the halves of the caliper together * an internally damaged brake hose acting like a one-way valve and not releasing pressure

177178179
Brake Pads and Rotors
Chevy Silverado
Dodge Dakota

Is there anything special to do when changing the rear brakes on a 99 Dakota truck?

I have a 99 Dakota and when I changed the rear brakes there was noting special I had to do to them. just remember with any rear "drum" brakes. you need to make sure when you replace the shoes that you also replace the hardware (tension springs, hold down springs). If you go to any auto part store and ask them for the rear brake hardware kit they will know what you are talking about.

177178179
Brake Pads and Rotors
Chrysler Cirrus
Honda Accord EX

How do you change brakes on a '95 Chrysler Cirrus LX?

1. take tire off .remove calipher using star tool 2.push pads out of calipher 3.using c clamp push piston back in until flush 4.place new pads in place 5.put calipher back on rotor 6. line up metal sleeve with bolt if unable to do so sleeve may be slightly bent than replace and that might solve the problem

169170171

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