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Answered 2015-01-11 16:39:59

A noun phrase is any word or group of words based on a noun or pronoun (without a verb) that can function in a sentence as a subject, object of a verb or a preposition. A noun phrase can be one word or many words.

An object complement is a noun (or a noun phrase) that follows and modifies or refers to a direct object in a sentence.

Examples of noun phrases as object complement:

  • He was riding a bicycle, his own.
  • We have scheduled a speaker, Professor Einstein.
  • I brought a treat, my mother's homemade cookies.
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Three types of nouns used a complements?

A complement is a word or phrase that is necessary in order to complete the meaning.Three functions of a noun (or noun phrase) as a complement are a subject complement, an object complement, or the object of a preposition.A subject complement (also called a predicate nominative) is the noun or a pronoun following a linking verb that restates the subject. The subject of a linking verb is or becomes the object.Example: Jim was elected class president. (Jim = class president)An object complement is a noun or a pronoun that follows and restates the direct object.Examples:We met the new neighbors, the Smiths. (neighbors = Smiths)We met the Smiths, the new neighbors. (Smiths = new neighbors)The object of a preposition is a complement when it is needed to identify a noun or a pronoun in the sentence.Examples:The boy in blue has the tickets. (Which boy? The one in blue.)That boy in blue has the tickets. (Not a complement. The boy is indicated by gesture of the speaker, the prepositional phrase 'in blue' is not essential to identify the boy.)


How do you use printer as an object complement?

I found the cat sleeping on the printer. The phrase on the printer is the object complement.


What are the examples of noun phrase that functions as the complement of the subject?

A noun phrase is any word or group of words based on a noun or pronoun (without a verb) that can function in a sentence as a subject or an object. A noun phrase can be one word or many words.A subject complement is a word '(or group of words) that follows a linking verb and modifies or renames the subject. It may be a noun or an adjective.A noun that functions as a subject complement is called a predicate noun or predicate nominative.Examples:Mary is my sister.That racket was a flock of geese.These are the best chocolate chip cookies.


What is the difference between 'you and I' and 'you and me'?

The noun phrase 'you and I' is the subjective form.The noun phrase 'you and me' is the objective form.The pronoun 'you' functions as both subject and object in a sentence.The pronoun 'I' functions as a subject in a sentence.The pronoun 'me' functions as an object in a sentence.Examples:You and I can do this together. (subject of the sentence)We can do this together, you and I. (subject complement)The project that you and I did together is done. (subject of the relative clause)They invited you and me to dinner. (direct object of the verb 'invited')They're making you and me something special. (indirect object of the verb 'making')The invitation was for you and me. (object of the preposition 'for')


What is a verb complement?

A verb complement is any word or phrase that completes the meaning of a subject, an object or a verb. Specifically, it is a complement formed using infinitives, gerunds, or noun clauses.Examples (verb complement in bold):I asked him to leave. (indirect object + infinitive)I wanted to know the answer (infinitive phrase)I considered leaving my job. (gerund phrase)I insisted that I was right. (pronoun forms a noun clause)I wondered why he came. (pronoun forms a noun clause)


Ahmed is her. is her an object or complement?

No, the word 'her' is the object of the linking verb 'is' (an awkward sentence, it's more usual to phrase the idea as 'She is Ahmed.').An object complement is a noun, pronoun, or an adjective that follows the object of the verb, renaming the object; for example: 'She is my friend Ahmed.' Ahmed is the complement of the object 'friend'.


What is the appositive phase of Jane made the salad a tossed one with French dressing?

Technically, there is no appositive in the given sentence.The noun phrase a tossed one renames the direct object, 'salad', making the noun phrase an object complement.The difference between an appositive and an object complement is that an appositive can rename any noun in the sentence, and an object complement can only rename the direct object.


What is a complement a noun a verb or an adjective?

A complement is a noun, a pronoun, or an adjective (or a phrase which acts as a noun or adjective).There are two types of complements in English grammar:The subject complement, which can be a noun or an adjective, follows a linking verb and further defines the subject of the sentence.Examples:Mr. Jones is the mayor. (mayor is the subject complement, a noun)The boy became sleepy. (sleepy is the subject complement, an adjective)The object complement similarly tells something about the direct object of a non-linking verb, and follows the object.Examples:We elected Tom our chairman. (chairman refers to Tom, and is a noun)They made the school larger. (larger refers to school, and is an adjective)


How does a preposition function in a sentence?

The Function of PrepositionsPrepositions and prepositional phrases perform many functions within sentences. The function of a word is "what the word does." For example, the function of the adjective pink in the pink rose is to modify or describe the noun rose. What the adjective does then is to describe the noun. Or, the adjective pink functions to describe the color of the rose. There are ten main functions of prepositions and prepositional phrases.Head of preposition phraseNoun phrase modifierNoun phrase complementAdjective phrase modifierAdjective phrase complementVerb phrase modifierVerb phrase complementAdjunctAdverbialParticle


What is an objective complement in a sentince?

An objective complement is a noun or an adjective phrase that is used to further clarify some object in a sentence. It describes or renames. It is used to provide finishing information to either the direct object or the object of the preposition.


What is the noun phrase in who owns the pink unicycle?

The noun phrase is: the pink unicycle.A noun phrase is a group of words that includes a noun (but not a verb) that functions as a subject or an object in a sentence. The noun phrase 'the pink unicycle' functions as the object of the verb 'owns'.


What is a pronoun that renames?

A pronoun that 'renames' may be a subject complement, an object complement, or an appositive.A subject complement is a noun, a noun phrase, or a pronoun that follows a linking verb and renames or restates the subject.Example: My neighbor with the Mercedes is him. (neighbor = him)An object complement is a noun, a noun phrase, or a pronoun that follows a direct object and renames it.Example: They announced the winner, you. (winner = you)An appositive is a noun, a noun phrase, or a pronoun that renames another noun right beside it.Example: The campers, everyone who participated, will have to help with clean-up. (campers = everyone).


What is an infinitive phrase?

An infinitive phrase uses the "to" form of a verb, used as a noun (subject, object), a subject complement, an adjective, or an adverb. The infinitive phrase includes the object or modifiers of the infinitive.Examples:To completely relax is often difficult for him. (to relax is the subject, to completely relax is the infinitive phrase)He sometimes tries to win the lottery. (to win is the object of tries, to win the lottery is the infinitive phrase)His ambition is to become rich. (to become is the subject complement, to become rich is the infinitive phrase)He lacks the experience to succeed in business. (to succeed is an adjective for experience, to succeed in business is the infinitive phrase)He was disappointed to lose the race (to lose is an adverb for disappointed, to lose the race is the infinitive phrase)


Can the objective complement of a sentence be found in a prepositional phrase?

The primary objective complement of a sentence can not be found in a prepositional phrase, but a prepositional phrase can be included in a phrase that is part of the total objective complement. For example, "John was totally lacking in judgement". The principal part of the objective complement is "lacking", but the complete objective complement is "totally lacking in judgement", which includes the prepositional phrase "in judgement".


What is the appositive in the sentence a fine example of colonial architecture is Monticello the home of Thomas Jefferson?

An appositive is a noun or noun phrase that renames another noun or pronoun just before it.The appositive is the noun phrase the home of Thomas Jefferson, which renames the noun 'Monticello'.NOTE: When a noun or noun phrase follows a direct object to rename it, it's called an object complement. The noun 'Monticello' is the direct object of the verb 'is'. However, the verb 'is' is a linking verb in this sentence, making the noun 'Monticello' a subject complement (a noun that restates the subject of the sentence, 'example'). So, is the noun phrase an appositive or is it an object complement? A good question.


A friend Jessica's cat which one is the direct object?

A noun (or a noun phrase) will function as the subject of a sentence or a clause, and as the object of a verb or a preposition.The word 'friend' is a noun.The term 'Jessica's cat' is a noun phrase.Examples:We brought Jessica's cat a friend to play with. (the noun 'friend' is the direct object of the verb 'brought' [brought what? a friend]; the noun phrase 'Jessica's cat is the indirect object of the verb brought)She called Jessica's cat her friend. (the noun phrase 'Jessica's cat' is the direct object of the verb 'called' [called who? Jessica's cat]; the noun 'friend' is the object complement [renames the direct object])


How do you make a sentence into a possessive noun phrase?

A possessive noun phrase functions as the subject of a sentence or a clause, and as the object of a verb or a preposition.Examples:The bicycle of the girl rested against the stairs. (noun phrase, subject of the sentence)The girl's bicycle rested against the stairs. (possessive noun phrase, subject of the sentence)We enjoyed the location of the cabin on the lake. (noun phrase, direct object of the verb 'enjoyed')We enjoyed the cabin's location on the lake. (possessive noun phrase, direct object of the verb 'enjoyed')We planned a party for the birthday of my mother. (noun phrase, object of the preposition 'for')We planned a party for my mother's birthday. (possessive noun phrase, object of the preposition'for')


Is my family a noun?

No, the term 'my family' is a noun phrase, a group of words based on a noun that functions as a unit in a sentence.The noun phrase 'my family' is made up of the noun'family' described by the possessive adjective (pronoun) 'my'.A noun phrase functions as the subject of a sentence or a clause, and as the object of a verb or a preposition.Examples of a noun phrase in a sentence:My family is from Utah. (subject of the sentence)This is the house that my family owns. (subjectof the relative clause)You can meet my family at the picnic. (direct object of the verb 'can meet')I'm making dinner for my family. (object of the preposition 'for')


Is variable motion a noun?

No, the term 'variable motion' is a noun phrase, a group of words based on a noun that functions as a unit in a sentence.The noun phrase 'variable motion' is made up of the noun'motion' described by the adjective 'variable'.A noun phrase functions as the subject of a sentence or a clause, and as the object of a verb or a preposition.Examples of a noun phrase in a sentence:The variable motion of the traffic was frustrating. (subject of the sentence)We were able to fix the variable motion of the unit. (direct object of the verb 'to fix')The uneven surface was a result of the variable motionof the sander. (object of the preposition 'of')


Answers what or whom?

The answer to "what" is a thing.The answer to "whom" is a person.The pronoun "whom" functions as the object of a verb or a preposition.The corresponding pronoun "who" functions as the subject of sentence or a clause.The pronoun "what" functions as a subject or an object in a sentence.


What is a pronoun as a subject compliment?

When someone calls on the phone and asks "Is Greg there?", I may answer "This is he." The "he" in that example is a subject complement (note "complement" spelled with "e" after "l", not "i"). "Complement" is a grammatical term for a word or phrase that completes some phrase (and complements the head of that phrase). In the preceding example, "he" completes the verb phrase, or predicate, "is he". "He" refers to the subject "this" and is also the subject form of the pronoun (as against the object form "him"), so I guess that's why it's called a "subject" complement, though, I admit, this part of the terminology is not completely clear to me. It might also make sense to call that "he" a "subjective complement of be".


Can a person be a direct object?

Yes, a person can be the direct object of a sentence or phrase; a person can also be an indirect object of a sentence or phrase. Examples:Direct object: He brought his sister to the party.Indirect object: He bought a new car for his wife.


What is the function f the complement shown in the parentheses in this sentence Susan baked Steve and Tim a fresh apple (pie).?

The noun 'pie' is not a complement.In the given sentence, the noun 'pie' is the direct object of the verb 'baked'.The complete direct object is the noun phrase 'a fresh apple pie'.A complement can be a subject complement or an object complement.A subject complement is a noun or an adjective that follows a linking verb and restates the subject of the sentence, for example:"Dessert was a fresh apple pie." (dessert = pie, a noun)The fresh apple pie was delicious. (pie = delicious, an adjective)An object complement is a noun that follows a direct object and restates it, for example:Susan served dessert, a fresh apple pie. (the noun 'pie' restates the direct object 'dessert' / dessert = pie)


Is playing catch a noun?

The term 'playing catch' is a noun phrase or a predicate.A 'noun phrase' is a group of words based on a noun that functions as a noun in a sentence. A noun functions as the subject of a sentence or a clause, and as the object of a verb or a preposition.A 'predicate' is the verb and all of the words that follow it related to that verb.Examples:Playing catch will get them some fresh air. (noun phrase, subject of the sentence)We like playing catch when we're bored. (noun phrase, direct object of the verb 'like')I have some time for playing catch. (noun phrase, object of the preposition 'for')He was playing catch with his brother. (predicate, the noun 'catch' is the direct object of the verb 'was playing')


Which sentence has a gerund or gerund phrase that functions as the direct object of the sentence?

This one: I like reading