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Answered 2010-06-14 06:44:22

If you are NOT At Fault you have no responsibility and the vehicles insurance company that is at fault must pay all damages and costs including a rental car. If you are at fault it depends on the vehicles insurance policy if it covers alternate drivers.

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Absolutely. You are responsible for making sure the vehicle that you are driving is insured. It does not make any difference that you have other car insurance or even that the owner of the vehicle has other insurance. If there is not insurance on the vehicle you are driving then you are guilty.


Yes.. but make sure you have good documentation with dates on the accident reports.


Yes, the owners of the vehicle (and driver of course) are the ones sued, it has nothing to do with who is the named insured on the insurance policy.


Yes. If it's a company car and is insured through your employer, the employer's insurance company would pay out the claim. The accident would still show up on your record though.


If you have an accident with an uninsured vehicle, you and your insurance company are still liable for all damages, even though the other vehicle has no insurance. The only thing that will happen to the other driver is a citation for driving with no insurance.


You prey that the other driver doesn't find out that even though he was not insured, you and your insurance co. are still liable for all damages. You still need to report the accident to your insurance co, though.


If there is no insurance on the vehicle and you get a ticket for driving without insurance you are guilty of the offense and will have to pay your fine. Even though the vehicle belongs to someone else it is the responsibility of the driver to make sure there is valid auto insurance on the vehicle before driving it.



The people responsible for an automobile accident are those who are operating the involved vehicles at the time of the accident - unless the cause is mechanical failure or some other event outside the control or any of the operators. The person responsible for paying for the resulting damages may be the vehicle owners or the person who bought the vehicle insurance (usually, but not always, the same person). When operator negligence is involved, the operator may be responsible for paying the damages, even though the operator is not the insured person.


Yes, if they have a licence, also they have to be insured on your car. Or they have to have a special insurance so you can drive others car. Hope I helped even though i dont drive.In the UK - if you have a valid policy of comprehensive motor insurance on your own own motor vehicle you will often be insured to drive third party in another person's vehicle, Clearly you would need the consent of the other vehicle owner and you should check your own policy of motor insurance. To see the different types of motor insurance policy in the UK - notably the difference between comprehensive and third party see the link entitled - "Car accident Insurance".



Although your own auto insurance may very well follow you to a loaner vehicle. It only follows you as "Secondary" coverage. It is still the vehicle owners responsibility to provide "Primary" coverage for his or her vehicle when that vehicle is being operated on public roads regardless of who is driving it.Additionally, If an officer runs the license plate of the loaner vehicle you are driving and finds that it is uninsured. The driver will be ticketed. It is not the officers responsibility to determine if your coverage from your own vehicle transfers to the one you are driving. You could always argue that in court at a later time if you wish in your defense.If an at fault accident were to occur, Both the driver and the vehicle owner can be held financially liable for any damages or injuries that may occur, so the owner must still have the vehicle insured to cover his or her own liabilities even though they may not have been driving the vehicle at the time of the accident.Remember that it is the vehicle owners responsibility to provide "primary" coverage for the vehicle.AnswerIn all likelihood, yes, the car does need to be insured. This is because the vehicle in question would have to be properly registered in order to do this it must be properly insured. That being said, the owner of the vehicle can buy insurance just to cover the car while it's parked. Double check with your insurance company. It is likely to cover the car while you, the insured, are driving it.


Yes he did. Actually he had insurance on his legs and not just the feet though. Keith Richards insured a finger and you can guess what Dolly Parton insured.


Yes, they can add you as an "additional insured" on the policy. It could possible make his insurance rates go up though as it will then be considering your age and driving history.


Though paying rebate to insured by agents is prohibited, that does not hinder in the way of getting insurance proceeds.


You are the one legally in the care, custody, and control of the vehicle and therefore are the one who will be cited for driving without insurance. This is just the beginning of your trouble though. If you were at fault, you are also responsible for the damages done in the accident which may include injuries and damages to the vehicle you hit.


No. If the accident was your fault, you can not get money from the other person's car insurance.


Yes, The insured can add a spouse to the policy as a co-insured. You don't have to be on the deed.


If they were the permissive driver of your vehicle in an accident (and got the dui), your policy will be paying for the damages (subject to any policy exclusions, and assuming the drunk was at fault) Insurance stays with the vehicle. So any rate increase that this accident generates will be on your policy, as well (of course) as your collison deductible. If you are asking what happens if they were just driving your vehicle and got a dui, no accident or loss. I doubt anything will happen. You might want to rethink who you let drive your vehicle though.


Explain to them that you shared the financed "account," and you should receive the money because they car was also your car. Though, sorry to hear about your fiance :(


Two problems... First, if the accident was in any way your fault, then you are on the hook for that percentage of the cost of the accident. Since most accidents are never 100% one person's fault, this could cost you thousands or more. Even though the other driver most probably has un-insured/under-insured coverage, you can be assured that he/she will subrogate the claim, and their insurance company will come after you for payment. Second, many states require insurance as a requirement for driving a car. Failure to have insurance is a chargeable offense, and you could be fined and/or jailed because of this. At minimum, you can expect that your license will be suspended or revoked.


No. Their insurance will cover the damage to their vehicle, though they will not be happy about an unlisted driver being behind the wheel having an accident. If they have no physical damage coverage it will not be repaired or replaced.


It depends on whos fault the accident was, yours or the other driver.AnswerFor financial purposes though, so long as you are a covered driver her auto insurance will cover the damages.


A matured endowment is a life insurance policy where the current cash value has become equal to the face amount of the policy. The policy is mature. So, the insurance company issues the insured a check for the face amount (death benefit) even though the insured is still alive.


If the vehicle has insurance it will cover damage to the other vehicle but not the one you are driving. Now if you have insurance on another vehicle your insurance will cover the damage to the vehicle that you where driving even though it is not on your policy.



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