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William Shakespeare

What is a chorus in Shakespeare?


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Anonymous
2020-04-20 09:12:59
2020-04-20 09:12:59

don't know


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Wiki User
2009-05-26 21:15:26
2009-05-26 21:15:26

The chorus is a group of people (or sometimes even one person) who recite(s) the prologue/introduction to each act in Shakespeare's plays. In Romeo and Juliet, the prologue and introductions are all in sonnet form. The prologue to Romeo and Juliet simply gives a sense of what the play is about, and the introductions to the rest of the acts sort of summarise what is to come as well. I guess the chorus is sort of like an overture in an opera; it sets the mood. Also, because the audience in Shakespeare's day was so rude and often extremely noisy, the prologue actually tells the audience to be quiet and pay attention.

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The chorus in Henry V is Shakespeare's best use of this device. It is particularly effective because, as the chorus points out, the action is grandiose and encompasses England and France and the famous battle of Agincourt.

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I know the words for the chorus but not the verse. Shakespeare wrote in verse.

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The chorus in plays such as Romeo and Juliet, Pericles and Henry V, gives background information and helps to set the stage for the action to come.


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