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What is seismic shaking-?


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Answered 2014-11-19 12:32:06

"Seismic" refers to an earthquake, so seismic shaking is the shaking motion of the earth (and things on it) caused by an earthquake.

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"Seismic" refers to an earthquake, so seismic shaking is the shaking motion of the earth (and things on it) caused by an earthquake. There are different waves that emanate from the hypocenter, or point of origin.


Ground shaking is created by seismic earth movements. This seismic earth movement produces ground shaking upon reaching the ground surface.


Seismic waves are the vibrations from earthquakes that travel through the earths surface and is measured bye the shaking you feel.


The seismic wave is influenced by the shaking source dimensions of all directions. This comes from the shaking of an earthquake.


Seismic waves are sent out from the focus, and the shaking that this causes is what you feel as an earthquake.


Most scientists use a machine called a seismograph which has a pen on the end and moves when there is shaking from the seismic waves. It records the shaking on a rotating paper called a seismogram. The up and down lines you see sometimes are drawn by the seismograph.


When building a house, regional seismic hazard maps are used to find the best (or the worst) place to locate for earthquake shaking. Although greatly confused with its sister, seismic risk, seismic hazard is the study of expected earthquake ground motions at any point on the earth.


an earthquake is shaking or sometimes displacement of ground as a result of a sudden release of energy in the earths crust that created seismic waves.


The seismic waves affect tall buildings more. It is because shaking may cause them to collide.


The Kobe earthquake showed that building codes needed vast improvements so structures would withstand more seismic punishment. Transportation systems would likewise have to be improved to resist seismic shaking.




The energy released by fault movement forms seismic waves. These waves then cause an earthquake and is felt as a sudden and violent shaking of the Earth's surface.


(not seismic, seismic wave)Seismic waves are waves of energy that travel through the earth.


L waves are the slowest moving of all waves, so the most intense shaking usually comes at the end of an earthquake.


The Mercalli scale allocates a value to an earthquake based on the perceived shaking in a specific area as well as the damage to buildings and infrastructure that has occurred. The US Geological survey also use data based on the amplitudes of seismic waves and surface accelerations as measured on seismometers to quantify "perceived shaking".


Seismic shifting is the shifting of the earth's crustal plates, causing seismic activity.


P-Waves are the fastest seismic wave and as such are the first to arrive at a given seismic station.


The Mercalli intensity scale allocates a value to an earthquake based on the perceived shaking in a specific area as well as the damage to buildings and infrastructure that has occurred. The US Geological survey also use data based on the amplitudes of seismic waves and surface accelerations as measured on seismometers to quantify "perceived shaking"


A seismic gap is: a part of an active fault that has not recently experienced seismic activity.


Seismic plan is to produce and maintain seismic-resisting system components in construction work.


GLKM - is just km (kilometer), for 2D seismic - liner kilometer (of seismic profile)


Shaking can be a verb as part of a continuous structure (They are shaking hands) or it can be a gerund which is rather a noun (Shaking hands is not customary in Japan.)


The strongest shaking is towards the center of the actual earthquake which it is called the focus. The epicenter of an earthquake is the point on the Earth's surface above the focus or hypocenter which is the point within the Earth where the rupture occurs. As such the epicenter is the closest point to this and the seismic waves have had to travel through the smallest amount of material and so have undergone the least amount of attenuation (in this case attenuation is a reduction in amplitude of the seismic waves due to energy being by moving through the Earth). However as with a lot of things in Earth sciences there can be exceptions to this! This is because the amplitude of seismic waves is affected by the density (related to the level of compaction in the case of soils) of the material through which it is traveling). So a seismic wave traveling through a hard rock such as granite will have a much lower amplitude than one traveling through a softer, less dense, poorly compacted material such as a soil and so due to the higher amplitude there will be a higher level of perceived and measurable ground shaking, even an equal distances from the epicenter.


what are some examples of seismic disturbances



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