What small difference is there between the black horn and the white horn of horses' hooves?

This is a Howrse riding level question. One is softer than the other

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From Horseman's U.com: White feet are generally softer as they hold moisture better. Black feet are not as good at holding moisture, and tend to dry out quicker and chip and split. I do not consider this a small difference at all, as both feet need care and conditioning if you want to keep the horse barefoot. Chestnut, sorrel, palomino and a few other genetic colorings tend to blend both black and white horn, creating a durable, flexible and easy-to-maintain hoof. Climatic conditions also play a part in the structure of a horse's foot. A black hoof in the rainy climate of BC Canada can stay moist and useful, while the same foot in dry California may always need attention with drying, splits and cracks. Breeds also dictate hoof structure.

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there is absulutly not much difference between the feet as both can crack etc.

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Some say there is a difference, but all the horses I've shod and come across I have never been persueded to either side of the argument. I believe the ground the horses walk on is the main catalyst in the hardness (or lack of) in the feet. Hard, dry ground produces hard dry feet. Soft, moist and muddy conditions produce softer feet. However the mud does act like a sponge when it's semi-dry and sucks the moisture out of your horses feet, hence, drying them out.

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There is no difference, in my experience, besides the obvious "white hooves are white" and "black hooves are black".