What was the Nazis Policy toward the Jews in the 1930s?

Throughout recorded human history the Jews have distingished themselves by keeping their culture separate from the major cultures in which they dwell. Due to this characteristic and refusal to fully assimilate they have often been ostracized. This is often a conveniently forgotten fact of American, British, Russian and French history although it is constantly recalled by all when it comes to German history.

The reason I mention this is that Nazi policies towards Jews in the 1930's basically returned the German government position to that of the nineteenth century. As in most societies, Jews had long been prohibited from certain occupations especially those where they could be influential over others - government, teaching, military, etc.

Following the collapse of the German Empire in 1919 and the abdication of the Kaiser, the very liberal republic which followed granted much more freedom to the Jews within German society. This did not last.

When Hitler came to power (only 14 years after the Kaiser left), he and his political party began a program to return the Jews to the position in which they had been previously. It is a fact the Jews trying to leave Germany in the 1930's often had a very difficult time finding a country that would accept them, due to policies similar to those in Germany existing in most parts of the world.

The 'Holocaust' of which we have all heard so much, did not begin until the 1940's, when Germany was isolated and cut off from the rest of the world by the British blockade.....point being that German policy up until the blockade was to cause the Jews to leave Germany / Europe. Once blockaded the anti Jewish programs in Germany took a nasty turn and out right murder became the norm.

Comment

The above answer is inaccuate. It states, for example:

>>> "Throughout recorded human history the Jews have distingished themselves by keeping their culture separate from the major cultures in which they dwell. Due to this characteristic and refusal to fully assimilate they have often been ostracized." <<<

On the contrary, Nazi ideology and policy ***in Germany*** were directly very much against assimilated Jews, at those who since the early 1800s had assimilated, who weren't obviously different from other Germans, who didn't have odd or distinguishing customs.

The first steps towards the emancipation of the Jews in the German states date from 1812, and by 1871 all the individual states and the newly created German Empire had placed Jews legally on the same footing as other citizens. Many abandoned their religion and became 'more German than the Germans'. (Compare with similar developments in some other European countries). It was, among other things, the fact that they were integrating so successfully that bothered anti-Jewish ideologues.

From 1933-39/40, Nazi policy towards German Jews was to make life so impossible for them that they left Germany. By the start of WW2 in Europe, about half had in fact left. Nazi expansion and conquests brought many once again under Nazi control, however.