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History of Africa
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Slavery

What were the conditions on slave ships?


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2017-06-28 01:22:40
2017-06-28 01:22:40

Slave ships were not a fun place

The slaves were usually very closely packed. On the ships the smell was so potent many people couldn't breathe under the deck. The slaves had to sleep on flat wooden surfaces which lead to getting a cut back and head. They were offered very little food. If they tried to do anything out of line they would be flogged. Many tried to commit suicide. There were also Killer Diseases going around the ship the most popular one was called Small Pox.

The Transatlantic Slave Trade - The Middle Passage

The slaves were 'stored' like you would cargo. They were chained to the wooden surfaces, there were approximately three tiers of these surfaces (they were kind of like shelves). The floor was covered in a dark brown mush that was made up of sawdust and 'bodily fluids'. The air would have been hot, because of the amount of people around, making the stench worse. The slaves would be brought up onto the deck once a day, if the weather allowed. Here, they were 'cleaned up' and 'exercised'. The slaves would be herded into the middle of the deck and sea water would be thrown over them (to clean them up) They would have sores all over their bodies from lying on the hard wood whitch would sting extremley badly upon contact with the salty water. They were exercised by being made to jump up and down (or sometimes dance to a drum beat).

Slaves would often commit suicide by jumping overboard or refusing to eat.

About 15% of the Africans died at sea.
Slaves were transported in the most horrible and inhumane way possible. They were crammed together so tightly that they almost couldn't move. They were fed the most horrible food only to keep them strong so the crew would get money at the other end. As the slaves were only taken out of the hold to be exercised all of their urine and excrement stayed where it was. Many of the slaves caught diseases such as dysentery and died. Most unfortunately, some of the women, and even children, were also used for the "personal gratification" of crew members. The slaves were beaten for the smallest things often until they died. On average only half of the slaves who set off from Africa got to the Americas alive. Horrible.

  • Slaves were transported in the most horrible and inhumane way possible. They were crammed together so tightly that they almost couldn't move. They were fed the most horrible food only to keep them strong so the crew would get money at the other end. As the slaves were only taken out of the hold to be exercised all of their urine and excrement stayed where it was. Many of the slaves caught diseases such as dysentery and died. Most unfortunately, some of the women, and even children, were also used for the "personal gratification" of crew members. The slaves were beaten for the smallest things often until they died. On average only half of the slaves who set off from Africa got to the Americas alive.

  • Horrible.



The slave ships were in horrible condition. All of the slaves were packed as tightly as they could be so they could fit as many as they could.

Related Questions

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On Slave Ships. these were not very good conditions and some slaves died on the journey

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the slave ships were wooden and they smellt horrible and the ships are really dirty.

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There were at least 130 sea men on slave ships.

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When slave ships landed, the slaves were taken to the slave market where they were auctioned.

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The conditions on the slave ships were horrible and inhumane. The slaves did not get food or water making a lot of them die. The ships were not kept clean and the people were packed in on top of each other making the spread of disease encouraged. The people who were made to be slaves were branded, and treated worse than animals.


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