When did people arrive in North America?

In truth, no one knows.

While traditional archaeology theorizes that humans first arrived on the North American continent about 30,000-40,000 years ago by walking across the Bering Land Bridge, there is evidence at numerous sights that people were here long before, perhaps as much as 70,000 to 100,000 years before.

What we do know is that a well organized culture existed near Clovis, New Mexico around 13,000 years ago. Initial results from the Buttermilk Creek Complex in east central Texas predate the Clovis civilization by about 2,500 years, and the Monte Verde sight in southern Chile predate Clovis by at least 1,000 years, causing serious doubt on the timeline of the Beringia Theory.

Some archaeologists have began to question whether older sights might exist off the coast of North and South America, one such case having been discovered off the west coast of South America in 2009 that is still being investigated.
In truth, no one knows.

While traditional archaeology theorizes that humans first arrived on the North American continent about 30,000-40,000 years ago by walking across the Bering Land Bridge, there is evidence at numerous sights that people were here long before, perhaps as much as 70,000 to 100,000 years before.

What we do know is that a well organized culture existed near Clovis, New Mexico around 13,000 years ago. Initial results from the Buttermilk Creek Complex in east central Texas predate the Clovis civilization by about 2,500 years, and the Monte Verde sight in southern Chile predate Clovis by at least 1,000 years, causing serious doubt on the timeline of the Beringia Theory.

Some archaeologists have began to question whether older sights might exist off the coast of North and South America, one such case having been discovered off the west coast of South America in 2009 that is still being investigated.