Chemistry

When urea is added to water the freezing point is decrease why?

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2018-03-07 14:31:33
2018-03-07 14:31:33

This is a colligative property. Adding a solute will increase the boiling point and decrease the freezing point. The reason has to due with intermolecular forces, and interruption thereof. When water molecules have solute in between them, the temperature has to be lower than normal in order for them to freeze.

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Related Questions


Adding salt to water the freezing point decrease.

it does not increase the freezing point of water in any way.

Because sodium chloride dissolved in water release the heat of solution.

The freezing point of pure water when salt is added to it is lowered.

Additives decrease the freezing point of water.

When you add any substance that disolves in water, the freezing point of water will allways decrease. The more salt you add to the water, the lower the freezing point depression.

Adding salt to water the freezing point decrease.

It is a freezing-point depression phenomenon; see the link below.

freezing point becomes lower , boiling point rises .

the presence of impurities decrease the melting or freezing point of water but the nonvolatile impurities increase the boiling point and volatile impurities decrease the boiling point of water

Adding a salt the freezing point of water decrease.

Adding salt (sodium chloride) the freezing point of water decrease; for an experiment add gradually salt (in known quantities) and measure the freezing point after each addition.

Yes it is a colligative property. Addition of a solute such as salt depresses the freezing point.

Possible destruction of the system (the freezing point of the water is under the freezing point of the antifreeze agent).

When a nonvolatile solute is add to the solvent (water), the freezing point will decrease and the osmotic pressure will increase.

Both the freezing point of water would decrease and the boiling point of water would increase.


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