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Will insurance cover my car damage if I loaned my car to an unlicensed and uninsured driver?

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2012-05-27 18:30:56
2012-05-27 18:30:56

My insurance canceled uninsured person hits someone in rear what happens to me

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Yes. It is the responsibility of the at-fault party to pay for the damage caused in an accident, regardless of the license or insurance status of the not at-fault party.


This will depend on the type of insurance coverage. The insurance company can decide to go to court and argue that since the driver was uninsured, then they should not be liable for damages.


Bad things, will mostly likely get a few citation from police. If he is found to be at fault he could be liable for the damage.


The Driver "and" the Vehicle Owner are both jointly and severally liable for all damages. She should contact her Insurance Agent for advice as to whether or not the Auto Insurance Policy will provide coverage for the unlicensed driver


both, you for hitting the other vehicle and the other driver for being unlicensed


Yes, (subject to policy exclusions and your state law regarding uninsured unlicensed drivers), the person that is negligent, at fault is the one responsible for the damages to the 'innocent' party. Regardless of their licensing/insurance in most cases.


No, I have never seen a citation for carrying insurance for an unlicensed driver. I recommend that all drivers should be insurance whether they are licensed or not.


If they stole it, probably. If you were stupid enough to allow an unlicensed driver to drive your car, it's probably NOT covered under your comprehensive; it may or may not have liability. You should contact your insurance agent for a definitive answer.AnswerYou said an "uninsured driver". So,, If this unlicensed driver is not considered an insured driver under the terms of your Auto Insurance Policy then no, there will no coverage. Additionally if you allowed an unlicensed driver to drive your vehicle and an accident ensued, Your Insurance company may cancel your policy due to negligence on your part if they get wind of the matter.As stated above by the previous contributor, You should contact your insurance agent for assistance in determining who is considered insured under the terms of your policy. If you purchased Direct without an insurance agent, then you have no advocate, your just left up to the mercy of whomever answers the 800 number.


Most likely yes.. but your rates are going up, and the driver will be cited.


If the uninsured driver had the permission of the insured driver to operate the vehicle then NOTHING will happen to the uninsured driver. In fact, in this case he or she is not an uninsured driver at all. The insurance follows the vehicle first, the driver second.


tell your insurance company and the police and your insurance company will pay everything except the deductible. If you have full coverage than your insurance is required to make good on the damage. It is up to your insurance company to try and get their money back from the uninsured driver of the other vehicle.


If you have an accident with an uninsured vehicle, you and your insurance company are still liable for all damages, even though the other vehicle has no insurance. The only thing that will happen to the other driver is a citation for driving with no insurance.


Why not. That unlicensed vehicle owner could be disabled and hired a licensed driver to drive the vehicle.


Same as if it where 2 cars. The uninsured driver will be sited and then your insurance will pay for the repairs and try and collect from the uninsured driver, if you have uninsured or underinsured coverage, if not you can take the uninsured driver to small claims court.


Uninsured driver hits another uninsured driverYour both out of Luck, Neither of you have insurance. Both drivers will likely be fined and both drivers will likely have their drivers license suspended.


The vehicle owner is responsible for 100% of the damages. They can let anyone drive their vehicle as long as they have a valid license (being uninsured is not a factor), but if they turn their vehicle over to an unlicensed driver, the insurance company will not pay that claim.


The rules and laws of insurance vary from state to state but generally speaking it is the automobile that is insured not the driver. So if your friend allows you to drive her insured car and you are involved in an accident you are covered under her policy(((IF her insurance policy does not stipulate restrictions banning unlicensed drivers from operating the vehicle))) in which case her insurance may not cover damages done to her vehicle or injuries to the unlicensed driver.


Let's see if I can follow this. Insurance company A is at fault because of actions caused by driver A. Driver B who is not at fault is injured, but is unlicensed, and Auto B has been totalled. Insurance company A is going to have to pay damages to Driver B for property damage as well as for injuries because Driver A is deemed at fault. The fact that Driver B is unlicensed is a non-moving violation and Driver B will have to pay a substantial fines for these issues.


If you have Auto liability Insurance and you gave this person perrmission to drive, The Insurer will probably have to pay the bill for the accident. The company will then probably have to promptly cancel your insurance coverage for allowing an unsinsured unlicensed driver to operate your vehicle. Your next Auto Insurance Policy premium will take into account your claims history and charge accordingly.


If this unlicensed driver was driving your car with your knowledge, you are screwed. But if you mean an unlicensed driver hit your car, if you have full coverage you should be able to collect on your insurance. The insurance will make the check to the leinholder and they will give you any excess or expect you to make up any shortage to pay off the loan. In some cases, if you did give permission for the uninsured driver, your insurance company will pay for the loss but make you sign an exclusion stating that the driver will not be covered in the future for any reason. You would be liable for full cost if it happens again. You can also expect a spike in your rates if they reside with you.


They will have to take the uninsured driver to court. Or if you have uninsured driver policy with your insurance, they will pay it.


If you have uninsured motorist coverage on your own insurance policy, your insurance will assist you. Often, your insurance will pay your damages and then it will file a civil suit against the other driver to get reimbursed. Also, you can sue the driver individually for the damage. However, many people who are uninsured are in that position because they can't afford insurance, and therefore you may get a judgment that the defendant cannot or will not ever pay.


The majority of the time no because it is an insured's policyholder's duty not to let unlicensed people driver their car because they cannot legally drive.


Assuming in this instance the uninsured driver is the one at fault, he or she is still liable for any property damage & personal injuries that may have resulted from the accident. The injured party will make a claim against his or her uninsured motorist policy. But that insurance company can, and often will, sue the uninsured driver.



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