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Conservatives linked it with changing social norms

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Conservatives linked it with changing social norms such as the sexual revolution.

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Conservatives linked it with changing social norms such as the sexual revolution.

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Q: What was true of the equals rights amendment proposed in 1972?
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Proposed constitutional amendment to ban discrimination by sex?

The Equal Rights Amendment was proposed in 1972. It said that equal rights under any federal, state, or local law could not be denied because of gender. To become part of the U.S. Constitution, the amendment had to be ratified by 38 states - that is, approved by a statewide vote - but only 35 states ratified it before the deadline, so the amendment did not become law.


Which amendment is equal rights?

The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) is not currently part of the U.S. Constitution. It aimed to guarantee equal legal rights for all American citizens regardless of sex and was first proposed in 1923. Despite passing Congress in 1972, it failed to be ratified by enough states to become a constitutional amendment.


When was the Equal Rights Amendment added to the Constitution?

The Equal Rights Amendment was first proposed by Alice Paul in 1923, when it was first introduced to Congress. Since then it has failed to gain momentum in the US Legislature, gaining the most probable chance of passing in 1972 before spending a decade in deliberation before its eventual failure in 1982.


In what year did congress pass the Equal Rights Amendment?

1972


What was true of equal right amendment proposed in 1972?

Conservatives linked it with changing social norms such as the sexual revolution.


What was the Women's rights amendment?

The 19th amendment gave the women the right to vote. There was an Equal Rights Amendment passed by Congress in 1972, but it is three states short of the required 38 needed to ratify it and add it to the Constitution.


Where did the equal rights amendment fail?

The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) failed to be ratified by enough states before the deadline set by Congress. Originally proposed in 1972, the ERA fell short of the required 38 states needed for ratification by the deadline in 1982. Efforts to revive and ratify the ERA continue to this day.


What was true of the equal rights amendment in 1972?

Conservatives linked it with changing social norms such as the sexual revolution.


Are there any proposed amendments by the Congress that the state refused to ratify?

Yes, this does happen. One good example is the Equal Rights Amendment. It was passed by congress in 1972 and then sent to the states to be ratified. At first, it seemed the amendment would succeed, but after 35 states had ratified it (it needed 38 to become law), the ERA stalled. There was normally a seven year time-limit for an amendment to be ratified, and although the deadline had been extended, by 1982, time ran out and the Equal Right Amendment failed.


Who the ERA passed by the senate in March 1972?

The original Equal Rights Amendment was written in 1923 by a leader of the Suffrage Movement, Alice Paul. It was introduced and passed the House and Senate in 1972 but was never ratified.


How many states ratified the equal rights amendment?

11 states ratified the Bill of Rights before it became a part of the Constitution on December 15, 1791. New Jersey was first, and the 11th state was Virginia.


Why was congress able to ignore the equal rights amendment in 1960s?

In order for a proposed amendment to become part of the U.S. Constitution, a minimum of three quarters of the states need to ratify it, which means to approve and accept it. It was presented to the states in March 1972 with a seven-year time limit for ratification, which was later extended to ten years, written into the proposal. By the time it expired in March 1982, it had not received the ratification of at least 38 states, so it died.