Abolitionism

Abolitionism is a movement against slavery. Its objective is to put an end to the slave trade and set slaves free. The first European law abolishing colonial slavery was passed in 1542.

1,804 Questions
Slavery
South Africa History
Abolitionism

What were the justifications of slavery prior to the eighteenth century?

The justifications of slavery during the eighteenth century were little to none until close to the end. Slavery was not a subject that was questioned whether it was ethical to keep the slave trade going. By 1750, still no one seriously discussed or questioned the existence of slavery. By 1888, the institution of slavery no longer existed in the transatlantic economy. Prior to the eighteenth century however, there were justifications to slavery. Chattel slavery did exist however prior to the eighteenth century. Chattel slavery is the ownership of one human being by another (existed in the West). Plato and Aristotle both provided arguments for slavery based on the assertion that persons in bondage were intended by nature to be slaves. Christian writers accommodated themselves similarly to the institution. They contended that the most harmful form of slavery was that of the enslavement of the soul to sin rather than the enslavement of physical body. They also argued that genuine freedom was recognized from the relationship one has with God and that if problems arise that relate to the injustices of inequality would be solved in the Hereafter. Christina Scholastic thinkers in the Middle Ages had portrayed slavery as a part of the natural and necessary hierarchy of the world and universe.

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History, Politics & Society
Abolitionism

What is the abolitionism movement?

The abolitionism movement (as you refer to it) was a movement to end (abolish means end) slavery. In Europe the movement to abolish slavery started as early as the 1500s. If you are referring to here in the US, the movement started later and took longer. The Northern states were against slavery, some had laws abolishing slavery as early as 1780. The movement took quite some time and there were related movements as well, such as the "underground railroad."

One famous abolitionist who was hanged for his crimes was John Brown. (An ancestor of mine.)

Slavery in the US was not fully abolished until 1865 with the signing of the 13th amendment to the constitution.

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World War 2
Abolitionism

What happened to Africa after World War 2?

By the end of WWII the primary colonial powers (France, England, etc.) were significantly weakened in the aftermath of a massively costly war, and what little power and resources remained were intended to be focused on European interests and problems. This left Africa, and the many African colonies, essentially free to begin pursuing independence, as they were hardly a concern to the European powers at that time. The drive for independence in Africa was also helped by the 1941 signing of the Atlantic Charter by the majority of the Allied powers. This document, among other things, was about agreeing to a commitment for self-determination for all peoples, i.e. an end to colonialism. Another component of the coming independence for Africa was that many educated Africans returned to their home countries and began to lead campaigns, protests and even rebellions prior to, during, and following WWII. Among these were Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana, Jomo Kenyatta of Kenya, and later, individuals like Nelson Mandela and Desmond Tutu.

Some nations like Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Egypt were already independent long before World War II, however most would gain their independence in a twenty year period from 1950-1970. This was especially true in 1960 when no less than 17 different African nations declared independence, thus this year is commonly referred to as "The Year of Africa." Some nations, like Ghana, were able to secure their independence with more peaceful means, others like Algeria and Kenya were forced to fight to end colonial rule.

The social consequences of the influx of independent nations in Africa was, of course, an increase in national power and pride for the continent, as well as representation for the nations therein on the world stage. It has also lead to a great deal of strife and civil unrest, as follows any period of great social upheaval.

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US Civil War
Abolitionism

What were some problems of abolitionists?

Most Northerners were not so passionately anti-slavery that they were ready to sacrifice the cotton revenues by abolishing it.

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Slavery
Abolitionism

What is abolitionism?

Abolitionism was a movement to do away with slavery, notably in the US from 1800 to 1863. Actual slavery in the US was outlawed by the 13th Amendment in 1865.

As a schism developed in the early 19th century regarding the morality of slavery, those who wanted it stopped (abolished) were called abolitionists. The idea of opposing slavery makes it abolitionism. Most arguments for abolition centered on the premise of the founding of the nation, that all people have an inherent right to personal freedom. European nations began outlawing slavery during the same period. During the US Civil War, Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation (1863) was the first document to address an end to slavery.
Additionally, in support of this comprehensive look at abolitionism it can be noted that abolitionists or regular government officials, or voters within a US State had abolished slavery in their respective States long before the Civil War. Vermont and Massachusetts as two examples. Also, in 1862, Lincoln and his supporters and Congress abolished slavery in Washington DC.
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Slavery
Underground Railroad
Abolitionism

What do you call the people that helped the slaves to run away?

Abolitionists.

Many of these courageous abolitionists were clandestine conductors on The Underground Railroad.

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Abolitionism

What amendment freed the enslaved African American?

The 13th Amendment abolished slavery in the United States.

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US Civil War
History of the United States
Abolitionism

What was the abolitionist movement?

This was a movement to abolish slavery on the US. The slave states had become dependent on slave labor long before the United States was formed. The right to retain slaves and even some credit for slave population in the assigned of Congressmen was put into the Constitution. However, many people in the free states hated the idea of slavery and as world opinion began to move against slavery, organizations were formed to abolish slavery in the United States. They published newspapers and tracts showing the evils of slavery and some people became radical and violent in their protests against slavery. As the time of the Civil War approached, the term "abolitionist" came to mean a person with an extreme position against slavery, a person who wanted to end slavery now and at whatever cost.

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Abolitionism

What was the historical significance of the American Colonization Society?

Hoped to provide a mechanism by which slavery could gradually be eliminated. Caused many arguements as to why eliminate slavery gradually.

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History of Africa
Slavery
Abolitionism

Why did some colonists enslave some Native Americans and Africans?

Unfortunately, many of the colonists had been taught that non-Christians and non-whites were inferior; many believed these groups were savages and heathens. They thus believed it was okay to forcibly convert these people to Christianity, which would make them more "civilized." There were also some colonists (including some southern ministers) who believed slavery was acceptable for Africans, since the Bible supposedly stated that people with darker skin were cursed (this was based on a misreading of the story of Noah and his sons, which appears in the Book of Genesis; but nowhere in that story does it say black people are cursed).

In fairness, it should be noted that this was a time when few whites were very educated, so myths and prejudices were a pervasive part of the culture, and the idea that it was cruel to mistreat Natives and enslave blacks was not always accepted. It should be noted that not every colonist agreed with slavery, and some sincerely wanted to peacefully co-exist with the Natives. But the majority view prevailed, and that view permitted both groups to be treated badly. Even the press (today called "the media") rarely questioned what was done to the Native peoples-- newspapers often stressed how the "Indians" were war-like and brutal, and seldom mentioned that perhaps they were angry because American pioneers were arbitrarily taking away their land. And southern newspapers rarely if ever questioned slavery or criticized the harsh treatment slaves received.

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History of the United States
Slavery
Abolitionism

What brought slavery to an end?

The Slavery Abolition Act of Parliament of the United Kingdom abolished slavery throughout the British Empire in 1833. This was as a result of the campain lead by William Wilberforce.

In the United States, slavery was brought to end by the emancipation proclamation of President Lincolon and Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution which ended slavery in the United States in 1865.

However slavery is still an everyday reality worldwide.

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US Civil War
History of the United States
Slavery
Abolitionism

What happened on Harper's Ferry in 1859?

John Brown and about 10 other followers went to the Harpers Ferry arsenal and captured it. Part of the army came and killed John Brown and many other followers.

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Abolitionism

Why did Levi Coffin become a abolitionist?

He wanted to be an abolitionists because he was exposed to slavery when he was born and wanted slaves to be free

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Abolitionism

What event might you attend if you were an abolitionist?

an anti slavery rally

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African-American History
Abolitionism
Sojourner Truth

Why was Sojourner Truth important?

Sojourner Truth(Isabella Baumfree) was important because she spread awareness about womans rights and slavery. She also was a slave and tried to protect others indanger of becoming a slave.

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History, Politics & Society
African-American History
Abolitionism

Who is John Brown?

Radical abolitionist John Brown and his sons already had massacred pro -slavery people in Kansas. He escaped the law and then was funded by rich New England abolitionists to incite a slave riot. He took over a Federal arsenal and with the weapons tried to incite a slave revolution. No slaves joined him and he was hanged for treason.

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Slavery
Abolitionism

What are facts about slavery?

1) It existed in every culture in the world.

2) Slavery started before recorded history

3) It still goes on today

4) Most died still in captivity

5) Slow death for slavery

6) Most were fed, clothed & sheltered

7) Even the smallest mistake they did was severely punished

8) Many of those who worked in household were treated well.

9) 27 million slaves were forced out of Africa and sent to Brazil.

10) It is usually Black (Africans) & Chinese who were slaves.

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Abolitionism

How were the goals of the women's rights movement similar to and different from those of the abolitionist movement?

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Abolitionism

Which abolitionist leader originally came from the South?

=angelina grimke.

555657
Abolitionism

What did the Philadelphia Abolition Society accomplish?

They convinced the colony of Pennsylvania to abolish slavery.

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History of the United States
Slavery
Abolitionism

What was an effect of the abolitionist movement?

All of the above. (Apex)

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Slavery
Speech Writing
Abolitionism

Who is William lynch lets make a slave?

Answer
The "Let's Make a Slave/The Making of a Slave" William Lynch is based on the real William Lynch who was the source for the word, "lynching". The "Let's Make a Slave/The Making of a Slave" William Lynch was a hoax, thought to be created by Edgar Allan Poe, that, although fictionally, lived in the West Indies and had "perfected" slave ownership.
535455
US Civil War
Slavery
Abolitionism

What was the name of the man who attempted to end slavery by force leading a raid on harpers ferry?

John Brown
John Brown

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Slavery
Abolitionism
Similarities Between

What are some similarities between Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass?

They both were born a slave. They also was born a slave. They also made a change in black history.

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History of the United States
Famous People
Abolitionism

What impact did Elizabeth Cady Stanton have on society?

IMPACT AND LEGACYElizabeth Cady Stanton led the first women's movement in America. She was its founder and philosopher. As its chief writer and speaker, she developed its principles and defined its goals. Although she initially became involved with the rights of black slaves, she shifted her focus to the rights of women and finally to changing the perceived role of women in society. She challenged the concept of separate spheres for men and women in her speeches and lectures, advocating the benefits for women in building physical strength and enhancing self-reliance, campaigning for the rights of women, and educating her audiences about the need for these rights.
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