Baikal Firearms

Baikal, a Russian firearm manufacturer, produces a wide variety of shotguns and handguns. Since 2005, Baikal firearms have been imported and distributed by the US Sporting Goods company. It also produced firearms for Remington Firearms in 1964.

548 Questions
Firearms
Shotguns
Baikal Firearms

What information is available on Baikal shotguns?

I have had good luck with the newer O/U models. From what I have read, the O/U Browning knock-off is one of the hottest selling shotguns going right now. I've looked for one of the S/S models but have not been able to find one -- in most cases dealers are sold out. Check out European American Armory, Corp. at www.eaacorp.com.

You can go to Baikal's website at www.baikalinc.ru. Be sure to click English version when the page pops up unless you can read Russian! Has lots of information and you can even contact the company via email.

Baikal shotguns have been around in the UK for a long time now. They are very simple and honest hardworking guns that will give many years of service. I own two Baikal shotguns (both singles) and I often choose them instead of my Beretta 391 semiauto. Prices in the UK for new baikal guns are about:

single all gauges �89

side by side �260

over/under �340

You can choose to have fixed or multichokes.

I recently purchased a Baikal 12 g. SXS with the 28 inch barrel. I have used it about 4 times shooting clays at the farm. My first impression was that it was LOUD. Since I use ear protection, this was really not a problem. Second thing: it kicks pretty well. Even though it had a kick pad already, I just bought a slip-on one at Wal-Mart. Initially, I felt that the gun was a little stiff, it didn't break open easily. Since I have used and cleaned it now about four times, it is loosening up nicely. I can hit with it. I do plan to change the sights. The ones on it are too small. For the money, I am thrilled with the result.

I looked long and hard for an O/U IZH-27 in 16 guage and finally was able to purchase one. I have run about 7 boxes throught it now and really do like it. It shoots really well and I can connect pretty good with it. It was really stiff at first but has now limbered up quite well. I would certainly recommend these guns for the price.

I recently purchased a Baikal IZH43KH Bounty Hunter 2 SXS 12g. with a 20 in. barrel. First impressions is very tight to open it up, but getting broke in better. Very noisy to shoot also, will need ear protection if target practicing or shooting for long periods. Also needs a better kick plate, will bruise your shoulder after awhile of shooting even with light load ammo. Would recommend this gun to anyone however, very fun to shoot.

I have had a model 27 O/U for ten years now. I just got home from trap shooting,some calculations with my buddies and we figure 10,000 rounds through it. It had to go in once for a minor repair.Less than 100 dollars. I located the parts on the net easily. It has chrome moly barrels so I can use steel shot in it. Truly a fun and reliable shotgun.

Purchased a 20ga. Baikal SxS with 26 in. Barrels, single selective triggers, choke tubes. Love it. For $330.00.

I recently purchased a Baikal 12 ga SxS with selectable trigger, screw in chokes and the ejector option. I paid $335.00, and it is one heckuva nice gun. I own a Beretta semi-auto, as well as a Browning Belgian A5 light twelve, and can't think of a better value than the Baikal. I'm thinking about picking up a 20 ga too!

Baikal shotguns Have been described perfectly in all the previous answers they are a great low investment utilitarian shotgun, that you won't be afraid to use. It will not gain any value except sentimental. memories afield or that first 25 straight.

I am not a gun collector and my eyes do not glaze over at gun shows ( which I rarely frequent) I have been an avid hunter since I was ten years of age. I am now 63. I do appreciate a good firearm. My criteria is both functional and aesthetic. I know guns. Like many of you who live on limited salary, it is difficult to cough up the shekels for a high quality gun. People, I am convinced Baikals are junk. Period. I too am occasionally deluded into thinking that I might find a gun which is high quality for a low price. I bought a Baikal o/u. It was so stiff upon opening the action that you practically had to break it over your knee. The seller at Sheels assured me that it would loosen up with use. It never did. The lock was extremely poorly designed and was wedge shaped keep the action tight. It would jam in so tight that I had to take my gloves off to exert enough pressure to open the gun. The safety quit working within three weeks. I tell you people that the lock designs and machining of the two Baikals I have owned would never be considered or tolerated by a gunmaker who had an inkling. Fooled once, your fault; fooled twice, my fault. I was stupid enough to try another Baikal. I know good design and craftsmanship and something in my gut kept saying - "there is no free lunch" but, not wanting to spend what it takes to buy surefire quality, I suckered again. As I have aged my hands really freeze up if I don't wear good insulated gloves. I have always hunted with a pump 870 but can't get insulated gloves into the trigger guard or feel the safety very well. I have always thought a nice side by side would be fun. Big trigger guard and thumb safety. So I bought a Baikal. This action is better designed in that the lock is smoother and not "wedge designed". The first thing I noticed is that it is really loud and kicks more than it should. The varnish ( or whatever the wood was finished with) wore off down the wood on the grip in one season. I only used it for hunting so I could live with that. The action problem is that the second barrel often does not go off. I hunt a lot of pheasants over a pair of German shorthairs and often get a chance at doubles. This is particularly disturbing. Pick any one of a thousand Brownings, Rugers or Weatherbys and they will function flawlessly. It really irks me that the sales people will lie through their teeth when you ask them if people have problems with them - that is when you buy a Baikal. However, when you trade them in they will admit that the complaint rate is high. I implore you not to be sucked in by trying to get quality for cheap. Ain' no such thing. Look closely at the machining - see the grinder marks etc. What do you think it looks like on the inside of the action. A good double is polished where it needs to function flawlessly. You might think that you're getting a Browning knock off, but Baikal does not possess the structural integrity that the Japanese knock offs do. Also, you won't by a super cheap Japanese knockoff. The problem is this. A Baikal has that first impression eye appeal and I suckered for it. Closer examination is another thing. I now hunt with a Browning.

I have owned a Baikal side by side in 12 gauge and successfully hunted ducks for 25 years and because I have to use steel shot now I will have to change to a pump or auto loader. My Baikal never malfunctioned during the quarter century of use. I abused it and used it for things that it was not made for such as disciplining the dog, paddling the boat after the paddle was stolen, I dropped it in the water and shot with it straight away and it never let me down. Other types have laughed at it but hey I am happy with it and it works for me.

SOME ADVICE FROM ONE WHO LEARNED THE HARD WAY: Based on owning two low cost Baikal double shotguns and follow up research at gun shops and on the net.

PREMISE; BUYER BEWARE WHEN BUYING A LOW COST SIDE BY SIDE OR OVER/UNDER SHOTGUN.Double guns are spendy compared to other type action shotguns. True?The reason is that a double requires more labor and the parts are more sophisticated to produce - especially for a single selective/automatic ejector double. Anything less than perfect will give problems galore.

In recent years the cost of high quality double guns has gone through the roof.Yet, Mr. Joe average hunter who lives modestly on a working man's wage would sure like to own a double. The demand is there if the price is right.

In the wake of this, some foreign gunmakers and U.S. companies have teamed up to fill the need. Remington imports Baikal doubles under the Spartan name, Mossberg imports cheap Turkish doubles and so on.

I have a problem called Raynaud's Syndrome. It is the frosty finger phenomenon.If I get my hands cold, they lose circulation - a potentially dangerous situation. As it progressed I could no longer get my heavily gloved finger in the trigger guard of my shotguns. A double has a large guard and a thumb safety so that was the perfect solution. Besides, a good double is a beautiful thing to shoot and behold.

So, having no idea about the state of the contemporary double gun as to cost, quality source etc., I went looking. I was bowled over by the cost of doubles - even the cheap ones. I finally settled on a twenty gauge Baikal O/U. It seemed extremely stiff but the salesman assured me it would loosen up with use. Wrong! It never did. A few weeks later the safety quit working.

I took it back under warranty and the salesman acted like I was the problem rather than the gun. He finally agreed to refund my money. I thought this was probably a fluke lemon. I then purchased a Baikal side by side. With field loads, it just sucked air on the second barrel. The finish wore off down to the wood in one season. I sent it in and had it fixed but haven't tried it out yet. They replaced a sear lifter.

So, I began to research and read all of the information I could find on the cheap imported doubles.Here is what I found. I talked with gun salesmen and gunsmiths as well as reading many testimonies on gun forums on the net. Even gun magazines are not reporting the facts because - guess how they make their money.

The hype on the web forums: This revealed the buyers psychology rather than standing up to the cold facts and objective research. When you talk to a guy who has recently purchased a car they always tell you how great a deal they got and how great the car is - right. Every time. The guys on the web sites sang the same song. Great workhorse guns - even drive a truck over them. Great entry level ( whatever that means ) guns. Read those reports and then carefully read between the lines. Reports like, "My Baikal really is great - although it is really hard to open when it gets hot when I shoot trap. Or, my Baikal is worth every dollar. I do have one little problem - the solder on the rib gave way. Give me a break. I really like my Mossberg Wal-mart o/u but the firing pin broke. Give me a break! Here is the psychology as I see it.

1. Like me, guys are in love with the idea of getting a good solid affordable double.

2. They go looking. They can't afford the spendy quality guns. Like a fly to the web, they are drawn to a cheap double. The cosmetics are often fairly attractive and the assumption is that the function, metal quality, internal fits, parts and finishes will be good also. Most of us would not know a well designed action from a poorly designed action and, since we probably have had good luck with guns in general, we naively trust that these guns are made with integrity.

3. They buy the gun, then justify the purchase come hell or high water. Objectivity flies out the window and personal bias takes control of their better judgment.

Gunsmiths opinions. All of the gunsmiths I interviewed gave the same opinions and reactions.

When I asked them about the low priced doubles, they expressed pure unadulterated disgust. The following are common complaints.

1. Soft metal on parts, pins, screws - therefore wear, scarring, burring were common with very little use.

2.Lack of uniformity of parts. (One guy on the web said he had seen more than one Baikal that couldn't even be assembled out of the box.)

3. Functional problems with aspects of action. Safety problems, opening and closing problems, selective trigger problems, doubling problems.

4. Solder problems.

5. Wood finish problems

6. Inferior bluing.

These are objective opinions and not based on fanciful speculation. One dealer told me that, out of 50 cheap Turkish doubles that came through, 47 had problems.Another told me that they had quit stocking Baikal because of such a high return and problem rate. Same with Cheap Turkish doubles.

Personal opinion: You get what you pay for. A gun simply MUST function dependably. If not, somebody might get killed. At the least, if you carry an undependable gun, you will be nervous and anxious all the time.

I'm the guy with the side by side Baikal. Sent it to Florida at Christmas time to be fixed. After a month and a half no word from them. Wrote a letter of inquiry a couple of weeks ago asking to be appraised of the situation. So far no response. Tell you anything?

Not sure what the questioner is actually asking; but I'll toss my hat into the ring anyway. I bought a IZH27 and could not be happier. Yes, you get what you pay for...and you also must understand what you are getting. What you get is a tool. It is rough but functional. For the price you pay, you can beat the heck out of it and not give it a second thought. It shoots and it shoots straight and well...as good as any other gun out there. Over 1000 rounds in several months and not one hiccup. The wood on my gun has a good fit and has an unbelievable tiger stripe pattern. A little stiff to break when new, but after 250 rds, this had eased considerably and gets better with each use. Automatic safety works every time, selectable barrel (trigger operated) flawless, selectable ejectors easy to use and tosses the empties a good 10 feet. I'd recommend one to anyone.

ANSWER :

I HAVE A OLDER MODEL PUMP ACTION BAIKAL 3.5" AND FOR SOME REASON THE BACK OF THE RECEIVER IS CRACKED FROM THE BOLT SLAMMING INTO IT !

IT LOOKS LIKE IT FIRED WITH OUT THE BOLT BEING LOCKED , NEVER COULD DUPLICATE IT AGAIN! BOUGHT 2 OF THESE ABOUT 12 YEARS AGO AND THE OTHER ONE IS DOING FINE!

488489490
Militaria
Baikal Firearms

How much is a smith corona rifle worth?

50-500 USD depending on specifics

399400401
Firearms
Smith and Wesson
Baikal Firearms

What is the value of a star b.echeverria pistol?

50-500

203204205
Baikal Firearms

How do you select ejectors on Baikal shotgun?

On the outside edge of the receiver, you will see 2 screws, one on each side. See diagram in figure 3 at the following link. http://www.eaacorp.com/diagrams-izh27lg.html When the screw is turned so that the slot is across the receiver, that should be "extractor" mode. When the screw is turned parallel to the receiver, the should be "ejector" mode. See also page 12 of the owners manual at the following link. http://www.eaacorp.com/Manuals/IZH-27-Manual.PDF

167168169
Firearms
Shotguns
American Gun Company
Baikal Firearms

How do you find information on WH Davenport shotguns?

There's not a lot of information available and most authors disagree on that. Carey's American Firearms Makers says the company was in Norwich Ct from 1855 to 1894 and made single shot percussion and metallic cartridge rifles. Vorisek's Shotgun Markings lists 4 different names, W.H. Davenport Firearms Company, W.H. Davenport Arms Company, Davenport Arms Company, and W.H. Davenport & Co., and gives dates from 1878 to 1910. The Standard Catalog says they made single barrel shotguns from 1880 to 1915 and single shot rifles from 1891 to 1910. Traister's Antique Guns says they made single shot and double barrel shotguns in Providence, RI. The Official Price Guide to Antique and Modern Firearms says single and double shotguns in Providence, 1880-1883, and Norwich, 1890-1900.

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Baikal Firearms

Does anyone import the Norinco 1911A1 pistol?

Unfortunately, no. Norinco was convicted of importing nuclear weapons to other countries, and the US banned trade with Chinese firearms. If you're planning on getting a Norinco 1911A1, you'll have better luck looking in the used market for about $300.

135136137
Shotguns
Winchester Firearms
Browning Firearms
Baikal Firearms

What is the age and value of a Baikal 12 gauge over and under shotgun in new condition marked 10-27EIC Made in USSR serial number 003127?

The Baikal IJ-27E1C is a 12 or 20 gauge Magnum O/U shotgun with 26" skeet-skeet of 28" modified-full ventilated rib barrels, single selective trigger and extractors, blued with a walnut stock.

No dates of production are available but it should be late 1960's to early 1970's.

MFG suggested retail $450

NIB EXC V.G. Good Fair Poor

350 275 200 150 100 75

115116117
Remington Firearms
Baikal Firearms
Hunting and Shooting

How do i get a replacement barrel for a Remington model 11 shotgun?

Try: Numerich gunpartscorp.com

Jack First jackfirstgun.com

Bob's Gun Shop gun-parts.com

101102103
Shotguns
Baikal Firearms

What is the value of a Baikal shotgun?

What it's worth and what it will cost to buy one are two different things. I have a Browning Citori skeet, Baikal 27em-ic-m and an Italian made fausti, can't hit anything with the fausti due to the fact it doesn't fit. The baikal and the browning have exactly the same point characteristics. The baikal can be bought for as little as $300 if you look around. but It's worth at least as much as a well worn Browning to me. That could be as much as $700. I wouldn't want to try to replace it with another cheep over and under. I think the value is great. Buy one and do as I did, polish the metal and have it reblued as the finish still shows some imperfections out of the box, and refinish the walnut wood. Mine will soon look like a gun equal in quality to my Browning. Don't be afraid to buy one!

AnswerI completely disagree with the guy who said he would rather have a Baikal than a Browning. Polish the parts - he's got to be kidding. This is an admission of poor craftsmanship to begin with. Reblue it - I can't believe what I'm readimg. Heck, one might as well get milling tools and make the gun from scratch. I would rather have a Browning on whick all the bluing was worn off, the stock was scarred and worn and had been shot 20,000 times, than a wagon load of Baikals. As far as I am concerned they would just be scrap iron anyway. AnswerThe Baikal is worth just as much as any good shotgun in the $500 range. I've been out numerous times with bird hunters with multi-thousand dollar Brownings or others and they missfire or otherwise fail to preform. I've looked at $4000 Brownings that had grind marks and other groves in the chambers and parts. I recently purchased a Remington 870 express magnum which wouldn't even eject the shells on the first firing. Remington Company wouldn't even give me a replacement barrel but made me send the brand new shotgun back to the factory for reboreing the burrs out of the shell chamber. I had to wait months for the work and didn't have the gun for the upcoming bird and waterfowl seasons. Arizona law prevented me from just simply taking the worthless gun back to the store. All the manufacturiers are cost cutting and I just don't expect any company to give you the quality product that they previously manufactured and sold. In fact I don't know any hunter that doesn't carry one or two back-up guns, shotgun or rifle, because of the possibility that the primary gun will fail during the hunt. Jack AnswerResponse: I have a Remington 870 Wingmaster which I purchased as a finantially desparate college student in 1962 - I hunted with it in sleet, rain, snow and fair weather. I drug it through the mud sneaking up on ducks. Never has it misfunctioned. Not once. Now I hear that Remington has stooped to importing Baikals and selling in under the name "Spartan". So, I can chalk off Remington. Here's the deal, it seems to me.The profit motive and volume sales have taken over in the U.S. and most of the companies are willing to sacrificeintegrity. Sad.I really question that you have seen "numerous" guns bearing the names of high integrity quality manufacturers like Browning fail. I have hunted with passion for 50 years and have never witnessed any of these fail. I know that it must happen on occasion but my experience tells me that this is rare. On the other hand Scheels salesman in Sioux Falls told me that they have quit handeling Baikal because of such a high rate of return and related function problems - he guessed it was at least ten percent. Another gun shop verified this. These are guys that know guns up one side and down the other. This is reality, not based on what I wish to be true. I "wish" that the Baikals had functioned properly.None did. I was so hoping to get an inexpensive double that I could use as a dependable workhorse. Just add up the negatives. Varnish that wears right down to the wood in one season, mechanical malfunctions galore, inferrior bluing, action opening stiffness - give me a break. It's crazy to compare this quality of gun to a Browning, Weatherby, Miroku (sp) SKB, Ithica or other gun of high quality. AnswerI bought a Spartan 20 gauge o/u because i had heard that it was a solidly made shotgun. It is an entry level over and under but i have to say that i am very impressed with the performance of the gun. I shot it all this 2005-season for dove and quail. I have never had it malfunction and it fits and points well for me. I don't worry about scratching it, dropping it or getting it wet because i know it is the least expensive shotgun that i own. I really do enjoy shooting it and it has become my favorite rough terrain shotgun.I have a Beretta 20 gauge Eureka 391 gold that i love but i really hate to carry it in really rough areas because it is so nice looking that i don't want to nick it up. I know, shotguns are made for shooting in all conditions but i would like it to stay pretty for a while longer. The Spartan (Baikal) is a decent, shotgun for the money and for me, it's been reliable. The fit of the wood to the metal is pretty darn good. No, it will never be a Browning, but a Browning will never be a Perazzi. Baikal/Spartan was made to be an entry level, good value, decently made shotgun for the money and it is. AnswerI am an avid shooter who has shot most shotguns in the $2000 and under range. I have a Remington 870 that I bought second hand fifteen years ago. It has never failed or misfired although not many shotguns look rougher. I recently bought a baikal o/u. Myself and five friends got together to shoot some clays a few days later. Everyone shot the baikal to try it out. There were Browning, Benelli, Remington and Winchester owners in our bunch. In about three hours of shooting we ran over 200 rounds through the Baikal without one problem. I paid $300 used for the Baikal, one of my friends (a benelli man)offered me $350 before the day was over. I wouldn't say it's the best gun I've ever shot but for the price I am well pleased and I believe I will keep the baikal as a good backup gun to my Remington. I just don't understand the infatuation with beautiful guns. I see my guns as tools for hunting and I keep them in great functioning shape. That doesn't mean they are without scratches and the way I see it, if after owning a gun for two or three seasons it doesn't show some wear then there must have been some reason I didn't use it much. Personally, you can keep your pretty gun out of the brush and elements but I'm not going to share any meat! AnswerMy Baikal worked fine with trap loads - field loads were a problem, especially in cold weather. Second barrel just sucked air. AnswerIn my opinion, a beautiful gun is not one free from the wear and scarring of normal hunting; this rather gives the gun character that carries with it a thousand memories.I like to buy a used gun rather than new for this reason.I wouldn't trade my guns for new expressly for this reason. It is difficult to express what makes a gun beautiful - but like the judge who was asked to define pornography, I may not be able to define it but I sure know it when I see it.Having said this, I heartily agree with the idea that guns are meant to be used. There is, in our materialistic society a sort of worship of material things for their own sake. So, men will buy a new multi-thousand dollar gun to worship, then buy a cheap gun to hunt with. Go figure. This is completely beyond the scope of my understanding. Material things are destined to perish - it is the eternal that is imperishible. Men spend their lives acquiring and acquiring that which they cannot in the end keep. I love hunting and fishing, but I see all this as gifts from Gods hand. I really enjoy the equipment, but in the end, its only stuff. How many do you know that think that satisfaction they yearn for will finally somehow be realized with the next gun purchase or whateve. If I just had a _________________ then I would really have what I want. This is all illusion. I used to run this circle myself, until I met Christ.
929394
Shotguns
Baikal Firearms
Geometry
Windows XP

If a Spartan SPR220 double barrel side-by-side shotgun is hard to break open is there any way to make it open more smoothly?

In my opinion, Baikal shotguns are junk - poorly designed and poorly crafted. I was stupid enough to buy a second one after having experienced the problems of my first Baikal. My first was an O/U. It opened extremely hard and stiff- you practically had to use a pliers to pivit the release, then brace it against your knee to pry it open,the safety did not work. The salesman assured me that good doubles are stiff and it would work loose with use. Wrong! The store finally agreed to trade me for a side by side Baikal. Guess what. The safety didn't work. Actually it was a part that moved improperly upon recoil so that when I pulled the trigger on the second barrel nothing happened.I took it to a gunsmith who opened it up - none of the parts were broken. The gunsmith said it was simply a bad design - recoil moved a part into a non-shoot position. This happened when I selected either side. The cheap finish on the stock wore down to the wood in one season of hunting. Now I think I may be stuck with this piece of junk because the warranty has expired. I have had the same problem on a Baikal O/U. Bad craftsmanship and bad design. A poorly crafted gun indeed. Steer clear of Baikals. Period. There ain't no free lunch and their ain't no cheap quality of gun. I just got a classy little SKB 2o ga. 0/U. Now that's quality - functions flawlessly. I'm a poor man too, but it costs more in the long run to cheap out. It seems this is a lesson us poor guys have to learn more than once. I have a Spartan SPR220. I have never had any problems with it. It was stiff when I first got it but it breaks open pretty nice now. I have never had any problems with the safety. I think it is a good gun for what it cost. Keep it clean and well oiled and it will be a good gun for you. If you have problems with any new gun, return it right away. It's not worth fooling around with. Just have it replaced or get a refund and buy something else. On the other hand, don't expect the performance of a $1,000.00 gun from a gun that costs $200.00 new. I have been around guns for over 40 years. I have never seen a bad gun. I have seen many people that are too stupid to own a gun. There is huge difference between an action which has such close tolerances that it is a little stiff and an action in which the part to part fit is poor and misshapen or poorly crafted. Most high quality guns are just a smidge stiff and this is intended by the manufacturer so that it will "wear in" with use. The lower priced foreign made doubles are often clear out of wack - this is just plain poor craftsmanship and often does not improve much with use. Baikals can range from tolerable to dang near, "stove up" as Grandpa used to say. In this day of technological availability, it is, in my opionion, unexcusable to sell shotguns, even inexpensive ones, in which the parts fit so poorly. Eli Whitney figured this out over a hundred years ago. I own a Spartai SPR 310 O/U and the more it if fired, the easier to open it gets. If the gun is new and "stiff", firing it will probably free it up a little. For the money, this is probably one of the best buys around - but then maybe i just got one of the good ones!

939495
Firearms
Baikal Firearms
Militaria
Newspapers and Magazines

IJ-70 makarov magazines?

Try e-gunparts.com

919293
Shotguns
Baikal Firearms
Sears Roebuck Firearms

How do you find information on Baikal shotguns?

Baikal shotguns have been around in the UK for a long time now. They are very simple and honest hardworking guns that will give many years of service. I own two Baikal shotguns (both singles) and I often choose them intead of my Beretta 391 semiauto. Prices in the UK for new baikal guns are about: single all guages L89 side by side L260 over/under L340

You can go to Baikal's website at www.baikalinc.ru. Be sure to click English version when the page pops up unless you can read Russian! Has lots of information and you can even contact the company via email.

919293
Firearms
Baikal Firearms

How good is the Baikal pistol with 13 shots?

The Baikal in question is a Makarov-style pistol with a double-stack magazine. While it is reminiscent of several other small blowback-operated pistols, such as the Walther PP/PPK and the Hungarian FEG-PA63, it is neither derived nor especially similar to either of these designs. The double-stack magazine is a modification of the original Makarov 8-round single-stack design. These pistols can still utilize the old single-stack magazines, although they fit a little loose. They are not considered to feed as reliably as the original Makarov design.

These are available in either .380 ACP or 9x18mm, and can fire either with a simple barrel change.

909192
Shotguns
Baikal Firearms

What is a Baikal worth?

I bought one as a hunting tool, not to be worried about mud or scratches.

Two years later I use it for hunting, skeet and trap. Never had a problem. It is very reliable.

My pals watch it like the poor's guy gun, but it does its job perfectly. Best of all I am not paranoid about dust, like them.

Has all the features of $2,000 guns.

what is a Baikal worth? What It's worth and what it will cost to buy one are two different things. I have a browning Citori skeet, baikal 27em-ic-m and an Italian made fausti, can't hit anything with the fausti due to the fact it doesn't fit. The baikal and the browning have exactly the same point characteristics. The baikal can be bought for as little as $300 if you look around. but It's worth at least as much as a well worn browning to me. That could be as much as $700. I wouldn't want to try to replace it with another cheep over and under. I think the value is great. Buy one and do as I did, polish the metal and have it reblued as the finish still shows some imperfections out of the box, and refinish the walnut wood. Mine will soon look like a gun equal in quality to my browning. Don't be afraid to buy one!

767778
Shotguns
Baikal Firearms
Sears Roebuck Firearms

RANGER side by side shotgun?

Ranger was a trade name used by Sears Roebuck, probably from about 1920-1040's. The guns were made by a variety of manufacturers, but a SxS double is most likely a version of the Stevens 311. They should be good utility guns, but nothing flashy or expensive. A 12 gauge should be worth $200-$250. The 20 gauge might be $100 higher.

This is an incorrect answer. The Ranger line was made for Sears and Roebuck, by Hunter Arms, famous for L.C.Smith shotguns. The Ranger was the same as the Fulton and Fulton Special. These were and are exrtreamly good boxlock shotguns, as many of the parts were the same design as he L.C.Smith. These go for up to 1500 dollars in 20 guage, so the 410 will ble worth more.

The 410 is the rarest of this model, and will command a premium price.

I

757677
Baikal Firearms

Where you can buy rifle barrels to your Baikal Taiga or izh-94 it is very good combination with .308 or 7.62 53R barrels?

You probably wont be able to. They would have to be specifically fitted to your receiver.

727374
Firearms
Baikal Firearms
Nerf Toys

How much is a baikal ij-70-380k pistol worth?

Do you mean Raikal?

717273
Shotguns
Baikal Firearms
Charles Daly Firearms

How do you remove the action from a Baikal superimposed shotgun?

Remove the two screws from the recoil pad. There will be a long hole leading to a screw head that attaches the stock to the receiver. Turn the screw counterclockwise until loose. The receiver should slip easily apart. Simply reverse pproceedure to reattach. You'll need a standard long shank screwdriver for the stock/receiver screw and a Phillips for the recoil pad.

The receiver is completely modular and nothing will "fall apart" after the two parts are separated...

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Baikal Firearms
Australia
Sydney

Would it be wise to buy a 12 gauge Baikal IZH 27 superimposed field shotgun if you live in Australia?

i just got the baikal izh 27 field and i live in melb, it is a good gun for the money you pay for it. around $800 you get a gun that you can be rough with and know it will shoot every time. The one thing you can trust the Russians with is weapons. the izh 27 can be run over by a mac truck and it will still fire that's because the gun is build like a tank. its good for entry level and very good for hunting. remember a duck doesn't care if it was shot with a $800 Baikal or a $5000 Bertta.

The gun is only a tool for the artist.Be gun safe....

AnswerIt seems all you Baikal guys try to talk yourself into the idea that a Baikal may be not as well crafted as a quality gun, but it is a real functional workhorse type gun. In my experience with a couple of Baikals which, by a gunsmiths testimony were poorly designed and crafted, I think comparing a Baikal to any of the quality guns like Browning, Charles Daily, Winchester, Remington, SKB, Weatherby, Ruger or you name it, is like comparing a silk purse to a sows'ear. Baikals have a fair eye appeal until you really look at fits and finishes, grinder marks etc. This is not to mention design. The Baikals I had ( including one I haven't gotten rid of yet )did not function in that "dependable" fashion you guys tout. List of malfunctions. The safeties on either gun didn't work. One had an rigid action than never loosened up - so rigid that you had to break it over your leg. The side by side would not fire the second barrel when using field loads - talk about bad design - the gunsmith said recoil caused a part to not work properly - this happened on both barrels no matter which barrel you selected. Guys, if you like quality dependable guns, you must spend the money - period. I'm not talking about a five grand Merkel here, but for around a thousand bucks for a new double you can buy a gun that will outlast you, your son and your grandson. Look at the Weatherby Orion for example. Now that's a workhorse, balanced well and a joy to shoot. It ain't too bad looking either.I saw a used Orion the other day that had a $750 price tag on it. It was in excellent shape. I would rather hunt with a quality gun that was beat up than any new Baikal. Period. Get a clue guys, your'e living in fantasy land. AnswerAnswer: Go to any reputable independent gunsmith. Ask him what he thinks of Baikal guns and the incidence of malfunction as compared to guns of quality.Ask him about design and function. One guy on FAQ said that you could drive over a Baikal with a truck and it would still be dependable shot after shot. Hogwash. Mine didn't function right out of the box. A ton of problems, misfires, safety problems etc. Don't take my opinion, ask a person who knows guns. I know guns and should have known better than to buy a Baikal. A good gun is well designed, well machined, well crafted and well balanced. Look for quality. Heck, I had a little single shot Stevens 20 ga. when I was 12 and it never misfunctioned in years of hunting; to me this speaks as much of quality as a $10,000 trap gun. I had a pretty little Spanish side by side that doubled. Junk. Quality will cost more but in the long run it more than pays for itself. John Browning would roll over in his grave if they had buried him with a Baikal. AnswerI own many Russian weapons, vehicles and fly their planes. I'd put any of them up against their competition. As to the Baikal/Spartan shotguns they are fine. I've put 1000+ rounds through my IZH27 without a hiccup. Yes, it is rough. Yes, it was stiff (200 rounds and it smoothed out) and yes, it did it's job. The Russkies aren't much on how pretty something looks...they just care that it gets the job done (although this mind set is changing slowly). Russian firearms are something you can use to drive a spike into a post and still defend yourself or bring home dinner. If you are prissy, don't buy one. If you want a gun that will take a licking and keep on ticking, get one a try. I don't care if I bang/scatch mine up...I just touch it up when I get home. As far as shooting and accuracy...it shoots as well as guns 10X its cost. I know, because I wax guys tails every weekend shooting trap, skeet and gentleman's skeet. First time I showed up with it you could see the looks when I answered their question as to "what make?". It has garnered much respect in the last few months. Personally, I'd have no problem recommending (Baikal/Spartan) it to anyone...but then again...I like all things Russian. Paka.
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Baikal Firearms
Colt Pistols and Rifles

Where can you get parts for a Baikal handgun?

I assume by "Baikal Handgun" you are referring to the Makarov pistol, for which parts are readily and cheaply available at many sources. One of the best is eBay, where you can find parts by placing the words "makarov parts" in the search box. Another good source of Makarov parts is the website Makarov.com, which is a company that handles only parts and accessories for the Makarov pistol, including a really neat .22 rimfire conversion kit. Makarov pistols have been imported into the USA from several different countries, including China, East Germany, Bulgaria and from Russia (as the "Baikal"). Another good source would be for you to go to your local Wal-Mart and pick up a copy of the Shotgun News, available at the sporting goods dept. There are many parts dealers that have what you need, as well as many sources for complete pistols, available only to FFL licensed dealers.

717273
Baikal Firearms
Farm Animals
Care of Horses

Where can you get a barrel for a Baikal MP153?

Remington now imports the Baikal shotguns under their 'Spartan' brand. Barrels for the "Remington" Spartan SPR-453 are the same as your Baikal.

707172
Winchester Firearms
Baikal Firearms
WW1 Trench Warfare

Where can you find a TruGlo front sight that would fit a Baikal IZH-27EM 1C?

You can find the TruGlo sight at Bass Pro Shops. Bought it last year for my Baikal izh 27em-1c. Good Luck.

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Savage Arms and J. Stevens
Remington Firearms
Baikal Firearms
Ithaca Firearms

Where can you buy a replacement barrel for a Model 37 Featherlight?

Cabelas on us23 south of Ann Arbor in Michigan has them in stock Contact Ithaca Directly: 419-294-4113. Very friendly parts department. very helpful. ==New Answer == Try Gunbroker.com also. I often see barrels listed there.

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Shotguns
Baikal Firearms
Charles Daly Firearms
Sports

Which is better for skeet shooting a Baikal IZH27 or Charles Daly Field Hunter?

Go with the Baikal. The Daly is nice but for a day of skeet it's to light. It will kick hard and a lot.

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Baikal Firearms
Charles Daly Firearms

Is a Baikal IZH27 or Charles Daly Field Hunter better for skeet shooting?

Go with the Baikal. The Daly is nice but for a day of skeet it's to light. It will kick hard and a lot.

Another point of view might be, what is better for driving on the open road, a truck or a sports car? A Baikal is reputed to be a functional, durable gun, and a good value for the dollar. The Charles Daly guns will have a finer fit and finish, and more or fancier features than the Baikal. A duck or a clay pigeon won't notice a difference at all. Your budget and your taste are the factors that determine which is better for you.

In my opinion it is a complete joke to compare a Baikal to a Charles Daily or any other high quality shotgun. In my opinion, ( after having experienced owning a couple of Baikals ) the difference is as great as the east is from the west. I had many problems with my Baikals. They both malfunctioned mechanically right out of the box. Ask a competent gunsmith to give you an objective evaluation of Baikal shotguns. Although I like an aesthetically appealing gun, function concerning firearms is paramount. They simply must function properly and dependably time after time. A double gun having a single trigger requires a very sophisticated mechanism and with it a high cost as compared to other type actions. I have owned 5 cheapies - a cosmetically pretty little side by side made in Spain - it doubled, a O/U J.C. Higgins about 30 years ago - it doubled, a Fox 20 side by side (not too cheap) and it did not eject properly,a O/U Baikal - more malfunctions than I care to go into, A Baikal side by side 12 - the design caused the trigger not to work on the second barrel - the gunsmith told me it was just cheap bad design. My Browning never malfunctions - and I am confident it won't in the future. My SKB 20 ga. O/U functions flawlessly. One other thing. When we look at guns we have to remind ourselves what we really want in a gun. Personally, I like a gun with a traditional look not a Rambo military look. I like a gun to look and "feel " sleek. When I bought the Baikal O/U, I was so single track minded to buy an inexpensive double, I forgot about the qualities I wanted. It was like pointing a fence post and the balance also resembled a club. The Russians have proved that they can make fine quality guns - but not Baikal. ( personal opinion and that of my gunsmith)

A guy on another web site said he had seen more than one Baikal that could not even be assembled right out of the box. How's that for quality control?

I can not speak for the "Daly" but own a IZH27 among my many Russian weapons. I have shot at least a dozen Russian shotguns. Those who owned them and my self have never had a problem one. Say what you will about fit and finish...mine is fine for what I use it for...they shoot just as well as anything else out there. 98% of it is up to you anyway. Over 1000 rounds through my IZH27 in the last 8 months with no problem. My first year shooting clays and I am very competitive with the group of old timers I shoot with. More often than not I am in the top 3 high scorers out of 12 or more shooters. Most of these guys are using $1500-$3000 dollar guns. Baikal has earned respect at the 3 ranges I shoot at. For skeet, I'd recommend the 26" barrel vs the 28". If you plan on participating in other clay sports or using it in the field, stick with the 28". Also, just from a cleaning stand point, I'd opt not to get the ported version again...although the ports do lessen felt recoil.

ANSWERFirst off, are you comparing two different types of shotguns? Do you mean the Charles Daly Field Hunter semi auto shotgun? If so, the semi-auto Charles Daly's aren't of the same quality as the Charles Daly double guns. They aren't even made in the same country! I have seen lots of Charles Daly semi's and pumps for sale very cheaply in LIKE NEW condition! ASk why? Buyers are very disappointed! Charles Daly USED to be a good quality firearm. They outsource everything now. Even their hanguns are made by several different manufacturers in different countries. Quality countrol is all over the place. I believe their double guns are made in SPAIN now, but semi's are made in Turkey. The Turks make a VERY good double gun, but semi's are suspect in quality. The Russian's have always made their guns strong and heavy! They never made a good looking gun as far as PRETTY goes, but traditionally they make guns that are hard to break!I want to question the one person's response about owning several Baikal's and never getting a good one, but you never have problems with your top end gun? I think you sound just like every other elitest shotgun owner out there! You never really owned a Baikal, but you know nobody will listen to your opinion unless you say you have owned one and had troubles with it If you had such bad luck, why on earth did you keep trying them? You sound like the elitest snob who cannot accept that Baikal owners got just as good of a gun functionality-wise as you did for less than $400!Go with the Baikal!!! Remington thinks they're good enough to make the same gun with their name on it! Spartan!!!

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