Boating Regulations and Seamanship

From sailboats to barges, there are laws and regulations involved with all types of vessels. Many of these regulations are for the safety of the crew, but they are also for the safety of those around them. This also includes questions about using vessels in coastal and inland waters including definitions of terms, IALA buoyage, seamanship, light and sound signals, crew and vessel safety, statutory regulations, equipment and documents.

522 Questions
Boating Regulations and Seamanship

A collision could occur when the distance decreases and bearing between two vessels does what?

stay the same

252627
Sailing
Boats and Watercraft
Boating Regulations and Seamanship

If a sail boat is coming down wind in a channel and another boat is on a port tack who has the right of way?

The general rule is that the close hauled vessel (regardless of tack) has right of way over vessels running. There would be exceptions. If the vessel coming downwind in a channel is so large that it must remain in the channel and the vessel beating to windward on the port tack is small enough to sail outside the channel, the confined vessel has the right of way, even if it is a power boat. If the boat "on a port tack" is broad on the wind and is being overtaken by a vessel running directly downwind, the running vessel is overtaking and must yield. If the vessel broad on a port tack is overtaking, then it must yield. Similarly, sail has right of way over power, except when overtaking and except when the power boat is a ship that cannot maneuver as quickly or is involved in fishing. Regardless of which vessel has the right of way, the general prudential rule always applies: if you can avoid a collision you must. If collision is imminent, both vessels are burdened. One needs to be realistic. A downwind vessel may drop all sail, but without dropping anchor will still move with the wind, whereas a beating vessel will stop much more quickly once sail is dropped. The privileged vessel is supposed to maintain course and speed not as a matter of rights, but as a courtesy to the burdened vessel so it can reasonably predict a safe way to avoid collision. === === Aren't there further limitations for disabled vessel, vessel out of control, vessel towing barges, and seaplane? I'm a little rusty. By the 2009 rules of sailing, if the boat that is coming down wind is on starboard tack, then it has the right of way (port/starboard rule), but if the boat that is coming down wind is on port tack, then the leeward boat has right of way (windward/leeward). Also, smaller vessels have rights over larger ones, but it a good idea, as the previous answerer stated as well, to avoid collisions at (almost) all costs.

There is a generally accepted rule that the more maneuverable boat should stay clear of the less maneuverable one. You must avoid collisions at all costs, so if a vessel is disabled, out of control, etc. then they should be avoided/helped.

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Boating Regulations and Seamanship

When passing through a lock which light means approach the lock under full control and?

Hreen

012
Marine
Boating Regulations and Seamanship

If you have an oily or saturated absorbent pad after refueling at a marine dock what is the best thing to do with it?

ggh

012
Powerboats
Boating Regulations and Seamanship

Two boats are operating near each other One of these boats must take early and substantial action to keep well away from the other boat Which is the boat that must take action?

The Rules of the Road are a set of navigation rules that specify which ship is required to take action. The full situation would have to be shown to identify which of the two ships is the "stand-on" vessel,

Where two power driven vessels are meeting or crossing, the vessel to starboard is the "Stand-on" vessel (privileged) and the vessel to the port is the "give-way" (burdened) vessel and must keep out of the way.

Please refer to the link provided below. See Rules 16 & 17.

*It is a false interpretation of the rules to refer to vessel as having the "right of way" over another vessel EXCEPT in Rule 9 (Narrow Channels and fairways)

234
Boats and Watercraft
Radio
Boating Regulations and Seamanship

When operating your vessel with a VHF radio what channel must you monitor?

Channel 16 is designated as the national distress, safety and calling frequency. All vessels should monitor this channel while underway.

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Boats and Watercraft
Sailing
Powerboats
Boating Regulations and Seamanship

When a sailboat overtakes a powerboat which vessel is the stand on vessel?

When a sailboat is the overtaking vessel, she must keep clear of the powerboat. Any vessel overtaking another must stay clear of the vessel being overtaken (Rule 13).

Please refer to the Navigational rules. Specifically Rules 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 & 18. A link is provided below.

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Boating Regulations and Seamanship

When two personal watercraft are crossing at right angles what should the craft on the right do?

Slow and pass to the rear

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Boats and Watercraft
Boating Regulations and Seamanship

What should you always do when a person falls overboard?

Have someone keep the victim in sight

141516
Boating Regulations and Seamanship

Which symbol on a regulatory marker indicates rocks or other underwater hazard?

H

678
Boats and Watercraft
Boating Regulations and Seamanship

What should you do to avoid colliding with another boat?

You should keep a good look out in order to avoid colliding with another boat.

456
Powerboats
Watercraft Engine Maintenance
Boating Regulations and Seamanship

What year is your Johnson outboard engine?

1991

123
Boating Regulations and Seamanship

What horsepower powerboat requires a Texas boating education card?

15hp

012
Public Health and Safety
Titanic
Boating Regulations and Seamanship

How many life jackets did the Titanic hold?

More than enough for the 2208 persons on board. Surviving the jump to the water, and the very cold water is another matter.

012
New York
Boats and Watercraft
Boating Regulations and Seamanship

What is considered reckless operation of a vessel under New York law?

following too close to another vessel

012
Powerboats
Boats and Watercraft
Boating Regulations and Seamanship

When does a sailboat have the right of way over a recreational power boat?

A sailboat has the right of way over a recreational power boat only when under sail alone and is crossing the path of the powerboat. I would expect a sailboat would always have right of way. How fast can a sailboat change direction compared to a speed boat? Speed boat drivers should be watching for sail boats or stationary boats at all times. Actually, on our lake, it seems as though the sail boats are stationary....hmmmm A sail boat only has the right away when it is in full sail. If the sail's are down and it is using its motor to power it, it is then considered a motor boat. The above answer is correct, with a little clarification. A sailboat would have the right of way over a power boat when it is under sail "only." In other words, if the sails are up but the motor is also operating, it would be considered a power boat and the normal rules of the road would apply equally to both. Also, there are certain categories of power driven vessels engaged in specific types of operations (like surveying, dredging, etc.) that have the right of way over all other vessels, including sailboats under sail only.

Further discussion:

Actually, there isn't a "right of way" under the Colregs. There are "stand on vessels" and "burdened vessels".

A powered vessel constrained by draft in a seaway, for example, will be considered the stand on vessel (privileged vessel) and must maintain its course and speed when an unconstrained sailing vessel approaches. The sailing vessel, in this case, would be the burdened vessel and must give way.

192021
Boating Regulations and Seamanship

What is the main reason operators are involved in collisions with reefs shoals or submerged hazards?

Did not check for local hazards prior to launching

001
Boating Regulations and Seamanship

What do three short blasts of a boat horn indicate?

Three short blasts of a horn indicate that a boat is using stern propulsion and is in the act of backing up.

actually engine-room telegraph use- depending on circumstances- All Back Two Thirds ( ship is going into reverse) or if stationary, All Stop. sometimes transliterated as ( Shut her down) or cha cha cha. It is used in this fashion in the song (Little Darling) which mimics and engine- room telegraph.

It means literally, "change of status" as related to a ship's or boat's motion. For example, when beginning to get underway from a pier, the ship will blast three short blasts when the command is issued to the engine room.

Rules of the Road. Rule 34, Maneuvering & Warning Signal

International. "I am operating astern propulsion."

Inland. (Same)

It's a salute upon leaving a port of call. "We're underway!"

"I intend going astern"

192021
Boating Regulations and Seamanship

How often should you conduct a fire drill on board a ship?

You start with whatever chapter your vessel is inspected under. You can find inspection books online for your type of vessel. Within the inspection book, the correct CFR is referenced.

171819
Boats and Watercraft
Boating Regulations and Seamanship

Which of the following vessels has priority when entering a lock?

Personal Watercraft (PWC)

Fishing boats

Recreational powerboats

Military or naval craft

001
Sailing
Boating Regulations and Seamanship

Which side of a vessel has a red light at night?

Red marks the Port or left side. (Green is Starboard or the right-hand side.)

Port

151617
Boating Regulations and Seamanship

When you are operating a PWC which boating laws and regulations must you obey?

Which Country? State? Federal waters?

001
Public Health and Safety
Boating Regulations and Seamanship

What is code for help?

SOS

131415
Health
Boating Regulations and Seamanship

How does alcohol use affect boat operators or passengers?

The increase in alcohol consumption, by the operator, is correlated with a decrease in operational safety of the vessel, its crew and its passengers. Or Physical reactions become slower.

131415
Fishing
Boating Regulations and Seamanship

How long should your anchor line be?

The length of anchor line is called "Scope" by mariners. The scope of your anchor line should be 5 to 7 times the depth of water that you're anchored in. It should never be less than 3 times the depth. In other words if you usually anchor where the water is 20 feet deep you should have a MINIMUM of 100 feet of line.

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