Bunsen Burners

The Bunsen burner was named after Robert Bunsen. It is commonly used in science laboratories. This category contains questions relating to the Bunsen burner, its use and its history.

2,307 Questions
Chemistry
Bunsen Burners

Used to light a Bunsen burner?

striker/lighter

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Bunsen Burners

How do you clean a Bunsen burner?

Wait till it cools off, then wipe the outside with a damp cloth. Unless you got chemicals on it, though, you usually don't need to--the flame is above the barrel, and the fuel burns off when you turn off the gas.

You could also do the next answer too...

- - - - -

Put it in the dishwasher.

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Chemistry
Bunsen Burners

What colour is a Bunsen burner flame?

That depends on the amount of oxygen you supply to the flame (using the 'throat holes'), the more oxygen you supply, the completer the combustion and the hotter the flame will burn. If you supply little oxygen the flame will be yellow, if you supply the maximum, it will be blue.

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Bunsen Burners

How can you make the hottest flame on a Bunsen burner?

By increasing the size of the opening at the base, allowing more oxygen to the flame. The hottest flame is the blue flame.

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Chemistry
The Difference Between
Bunsen Burners

What is the temperature difference between a yellow flame and a blue flame?


the blue flame is hoter than the yellow flame.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flame hope this gives u the right picture
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Science
Chemistry
Bunsen Burners

Does the Bunsen burner flame roar or burn quietly?

A Bunsen burner flame can both roar and burn quietly, by allowing more oxygen to reach the flame by opening a valve it will roar, by closing the valve the flame will flicker

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Chemistry
Bunsen Burners

Why should you light the match before turning on the gas for the Bunsen burner?

Because gas will escape into the air, making more dangerous air.

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Science
Chemistry
Bunsen Burners

Why do you need to light the match before you turn on the Bunsen burner?

Yes

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Inventions
Chemistry
Bunsen Burners

What do you call a flame on a Bunsen burner when the air hole is open?

This is the roaring flame. It is characterised by a light blue triangle in the middle and it is the only flame of the 3 which makes a noise. It is approximately 700°C.

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Chemistry
Chemical Energy
Scientific Method
Bunsen Burners

What is a Bunsen burner and how is it used?

From Wikipedia (see Link to the left):

A Bunsen burner is a device used in scientific laboratories for heating, sterilization, and many other uses.

The device safely burns a continuous stream of a flammable gas such as natural gas (which is principally methane) or a liquified petroleum gas such as propane, butane, or a mixture of both.

From ScienceByJones.com (see Link to the left):

The Bunsen burner is used frequently in the laboratory as a source of heat. This burner is designed so that gaseous fuel may be mixed with the correct amount of air to yield the maximum amount of heat. In order to use this burner properly and safely, it is essential that you understand its construction and the adjustments that can be made.

The three principal parts of the burner are: barrel, needle valve, and base. The quantity of gas admitted to the burner is controlled by the needle valve, while the air needed for combustion is admitted at the small opening around the bottom of the barrel. The air is controlled by turning the barrel so as to make the air holes larger or smaller.

Always open the desk outlet valve fully and regulate the gas supply to the burner by the needle valve. Always extinguish your burner by turning off the desk outlet valve (and then closing the needle valve and barrel.) If there is an accident always shut off the desk outlet valve immediately.

STEPS TO LIGHT BUNSEN BURNER:

1. Check connections to burner and desk outlet valve.

2. Close needle valve and barrel.

3. Open desk outlet valve fully.

4. Check for leaks with flame.

5. While holding flame above barrel, open needle valve 1/2 turn.

6. Adjust barrel and needle valve for blue in blue flame.

Always light burner in open space on lab counter. After you have adjusted it for the flame needed move it into position. One person in lab group is always responsible for maintaining the burner and flame.

Burner Procedure:

1. Light the burner according to our rules. Observe the yellow flame which is produced because not enough air is admitted to give complete combustion. The yellow color is caused by small particles of unburned carbon which become incandescent.

2. Now rotate the barrel until the flame is entirely blue. Two different zones should appear when the burner is correctly adjusted. Too much air should not be admitted as it may cool the flame or blow it out entirely. After having the teacher confirm a good hot, blue flame draw a diagram of the flame (use labels and descriptions). Indicate on your diagram of the flame where the hottest part of the flame is located.

See the Web Links to the left for more information.

Bunsen burner barrels can be rotated, either opening or closing the barrel, to adjust the flow of air or oxygen, thereby controlling the flame.

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Science
Chemistry
Bunsen Burners

Why does a Bunsen burner have different temperatures on the flame?

The basic fuel to a Bunsen burner is a hydro carbon which on heating breaks the carbon bond with other elements with differentiated calorific value and combustion with oxygen. This results in different zones with differentiated temperature

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Physics
Bunsen Burners

Who discovered the Bunsen burner?

Bunsen.

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Science
Bunsen Burners

What is the hottest part of the flame from a Bunsen burner?

The hottest part is where the flame is light blue or blue; which gradually turns to yellow as the flame is cooled by the colder outer air.

When the safety flame (yellow) is on, the hottest point is the tip of this flame.

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Chemistry
Bunsen Burners

Why is the yellow flame on a Bunsen Burner a hazard?

The yellow flame on a Bunsen burner is considered the safety flame so is probably not a hazard.

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Science
Chemistry
Elements and Compounds
Bunsen Burners

Why do elements change colour when there on a Bunsen burner?

Flame colors are produced from the movement of the electrons in the metal ions present in the compounds.

For example, a sodium ion in an unexcited state has the structure 1s22s22p6.

When you heat it, the electrons gain energy and can jump into any of the empty orbitals at higher levels - for example, into the 7s or 6p or 4d or whatever, depending on how much energy a particular electron happens to absorb from the flame.

Because the electrons are now at a higher and more energetically unstable level, they tend to fall back down to where they were before - but not necessarily all in one go.

An electron which had been excited from the 2p level to an orbital in the 7 level, for example, might jump back to the 2p level in one go. That would release a certain amount of energy which would be seen as light of a particular colour.

However, it might jump back in two (or more) stages. For example, first to the 5 level and then back to the 2 level.

Each of these jumps involves a specific amount of energy being released as light energy, and each corresponds to a particular colour.

As a result of all these jumps, a spectrum of coloured lines will be produced. The colour you see will be a combination of all these individual colours.

The exact sizes of the possible jumps in energy terms vary from one metal ion to another. That means that each different ion will have a different pattern of spectral lines, and so a different flame colour.

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How is the test performed?

First, you need a clean wire loop! Platinum or nickel-chromium loops are most common. They may be cleaned by dipping in hydrochloric or nitric acid, followed by rinsing with distilled or deionized water. Test the cleanliness of the loop by inserting it into a Bunsen burner flame. If a burst of color is produced, the loop was not sufficiently clean. Ideally, a separate loop is used for each sample to be tested, but a loop may be carefully cleaned between tests.

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It is based on the observation that light emitted by any element gives a unique spectrum when passed through a spectroscope. When a salt of the metal is introduced into a Bunsen burner flame, the metallic ion produces characteristic color in the flame. Some metals and the colors they produce are: barium, yellow-green; calcium, red-orange; copper salts (except halides), emerald green; copper halides or other copper salts moistened with hydrochloric acid, blue-green; lithium, crimson; potassium, violet; sodium, yellow; and strontium, scarlet. The value of this simple flame test is limited by interferences (e.g., the barium flame masks calcium, lithium, or strontium) and by ambiguities (e.g., rubidium and cesium produce the same color as potassium). A colored glass is sometimes used to filter out light from one metal; for instance, blue cobalt glass filters out the yellow of sodium.

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Periodic Table
Bunsen Burners

Why does sodium not decompose when heated using a Bunsen burner?

because its a single, stable element. its not like copper carbonate, which is a compound of more that one element; here these elements can break apart

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Science
Bunsen Burners

What is the hottest portion of the Bunsen burner flame?

The blue section of the flame.

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Science
Chemistry
Bunsen Burners

Why does a Bunsen flame cause a spiral to spin?

If I read your question correctly my answer would be heat convection. The air around the Bunsen burner is being heated thus it will rise and cause a vertical "wind".

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Chemistry
Bunsen Burners

What is the blue flame in a Bunsen burner?

it is the fire

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Science
Chemistry
Bunsen Burners

What makes a flame luminous?

Luminous flames are formed when the energy released is at a certain part of the electromagnetic spectrum. A red flame is given off when the energy is at the same energy and wavelength of red light. A yellow sooty flame is much lower energy and caused by a lack of oxygen.

Burning fuels produce heat. Heated atoms and/or molecules emit a photon as they return to a lower energy state.

Look at various flames, You may see concentric areas that are like layers, each one a different color. The fuel breaks up or is oxidized differently in each layer and each has a distinct temperature and chemical makeup.

Not all emitted light from a flame is visible, a lot is emitted in the infrared spectrum which we cannot see but will feel as it heats our skin. Some flames are totally invisible, like from hydrogen.

Some emitted light is only at very specific (narrow) frequencies, which we will see as certain colors, light and dark blue from methane premixed with air in a Bunsen burner or stove-top gas range.

Hot carbon atoms emit over a very wide range of frequencies at random, so we see yellow light from candles.

If hot enough, carbon emits a bluish white light, like from acetylene/oxygen.

757677
Science
Chemistry
Bunsen Burners

What happens when petrol is heated in a glass beaker with a Bunsen Burner?

it destroys the world, but if veryone is dead, WHO WAS PHONE?

Well it boils away and because the vapour is is inflammable you will get a fire. Inflammable volatile substances should never be heated up using a naked flame, its dangerous.

747576
Science
Chemistry
Bunsen Burners

Should a luminous or non-luminous Bunsen flame be used for heating in the laboratory and why?

Non-luminous flame should be used for heating in the laboratory because the flame is steady and produce little or no soot.Non-luminous flame is very hot thus, it is recommendable to use for laboratory purposes.Luminous flame is unsteady while non-luminous flame is steady.Another reason of using non-luminous flame because the flame of non-luminous is blue, and not visible unlike the luminous flame which is yellow in colour and visible.

777879
Chemistry
Bunsen Burners

Turning off the Bunsen burner at the gas tap puts out the fire because?

Turning off the Bunsen burner at the gas tap puts out the fire because the gas is a switch that lets the amount of gas that you want to burn. And if you turn it off then it would let no gas through and there for would not let the Bunsen burner light up.

Hope this helps

757677
Chemistry
Bunsen Burners

What is the purpose of the sleeve on a Bunsen burner?

The purpose of the sleeve on a Bunsen Burner is to switch between the blue/transparent flame (the hot one) and the orange one.

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Bunsen Burners

What gas do you need to start a Bunsen burner?

In order to combust you need heat, oxygen and fuel (like diesel in a car or in the case of a Bunsen burner a gas). Therefore Oxygen from the air burns with a gas such as Methane(the gas that can come out of both our and cows' bottom's - hence the stench!!)

I hope that helps!

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