Cave Exploring

A recreational activity where people enter caves for the enjoyment of being underground. This also includes cave-diving, cavern-diving and exploring surface pits. Topics include exploring equipment, methods for safely entering caves, and rope techniques. Caving is an organized activity where safety is a primary concern. Cave explorers often assist Speleologist with collecting data for research projects. Caving does not include paying to enter a cave that has paved sidewalks and fixed lighting. Entering a cave without proper training and equipment is not caving. Cave Exploring is a physical activity that often involves hiking and camping in remote areas. Caver explorers often publish stories about their experiences underground, including pictures they took in the cave.

Asked in Speleology, Pokemon Mystery Dungeon, Cave Exploring

What kind of cave structures stick up from the floor of a cave?

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Stalagmites. Stalactites grow from the ceiling. They are called stalagmites because they might reach up your belly button. That is a pun to help you remember it.
Asked in Geology, Cave Exploring

What are facts about dragon's breath cave?

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It is located at yellow stone The water is very hot so smoke rises and makes it look like dragons breath It also shaped like a cave where the water flows Are you asking about Dragon's Breath in Namibia or the thermal feature in Wyoming's Yellowstone National Park? What type of facts are you looking for? newtest3
Asked in Speleology, Cave Exploring

If a explorer went into a cave what landscape will he see?

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A landscape that is strictly formed by the erosion of water. Most caves are formed by the underground rivers leeching and eroding the softer layers of the earth like limestone. What is left is passages that have been eroded away and over time is ever changing. There will be stalagtites and stalagmites and crystals that have formed over the milenia. If interested, do a search on local spelunkers in your area. There are many clubs that go caving on a monthly basis. Its a lot of fun. P.S. Wear a hard hat. Hooweestik. Answer: The landscape or terrain formed by erosion described above is called a Karst terrain.
Asked in Titanic, Cave Exploring

When was titan cave discovered?

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i believe it was discovered in 1999. the team broke through in to the huge chamber on new years day. There is however evidence that the cave may have been first found 200 years earlier by a student who made notes of a journey down speedwell cavern which continued past where modern day explorers had been. These notes gave important clues to the discovery of a hidden tunnel which led to titan.
Asked in Science, Cave Exploring, Lungs

What is a spelunker?

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it is a person who explores caves. +++ Not according to most such people. I've no idea where the word originated [but now see below] - USA slang yes, but how, when & why I do not know. No American caving literature I've ever read, uses the word. The proper, international, term in the English language is "caver". Simple as that. !!! Since writing that below my '+++' answer-partition I learnt that "spelunker" was a rather pretentious but harmless invention by two American cavers in the 1930s. It was used for a while quite innocently and picked up the Press and non-caving public. Eventually the word became one of derision among cavers themselves for novices and dilettantes, and so faded away from caving publications; but this development was not realised by non-cavers. There is a fancy word, Speleologist - this describes a caver who studies scientifically the caves themselves (geology etc) and their contents (wildlife etc.). The first e should really be the ae dipthong character, but it is usually now emasculated to just e. Notably perhaps, one of the world's leading speleology learned-journals is called simply Cave and Karst Science.
Asked in Cave Exploring

What type of materials did early man use to paint on the walls of the caves?

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They ground up pigments from red and yellow earths also black charcoal and white chalk, mixed them with animal fats and applied them to the walls of the cave. They are amazingly durable since we can still see them today.
Asked in Speleology, Cave Exploring

In which region are the Waitomo Caves located?

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The southern Waikato region of the North Island of New Zealand.Near Hamilton =)
Asked in Cave Exploring, Carlsbad Caverns

What is the temperature in Carlsbad Cavern Caves?

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Typically, the temperature within any cave remains relatively constant despite changing seasons and temperatures outside. A cave's temperature often reflects the average temperature of the land in which it exists, with deviation from that based on the elevation and size of the cave's entrance(s). The temperature of the caves within Carlsbad Caverns National Park ranges from 56°F (13°C) inside Carlsbad Cavern, the park's most famous tour cave, up to about 70°F. Within the park's large caves which extend to depths over 1000 feet (300 meters) from the surface, there may be a difference in temperature depending on the depth. For example, the temperature of the Big Room of Carlsbad Cavern, at a depth of 750 feet (about 230 meters) below the surface, is 56°F (13°C). (The Big Room, an area of 8.2 acres, is the most famous and most visited part of the cave.) But, in the cave chamber at the deepest known point of Carlsbad Cavern, called the Lake of the Clouds, an area not open to the public for several reasons, is 68°F. Without going into too much detail, the Big Room is unusually cold for a cave in the Guadalupe Mountains and that's because the enormous natural opening and the vast size of the rooms allows cold winter air to sink into the depths and becomes "trapped". Outdoors, Carlsbad Caverns National Park's average annual high temperature is 74°F and the average annual low temperature is 50°F with a mean annual temperature of 63°F. (In the summer,average highs are in the 90°s F, in the winter the average highs are in the 50°s and 60°s F.)
Asked in Cave Exploring

Will you go blind if you are in a cave for 3 days without light?

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Not at all. However, when you reemerged, you would have to be very careful to shield your eyes from the light, and become used to the light gradually.
Asked in Speleology, Cave Exploring

What is cave diving?

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Cave diving is a particularly risky type of diving using specialized SCUBA equipment to explore underwater caves.
Asked in Cave Exploring

Where is the cleft of a cave?

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The middle of the cave.
Asked in New York, Cave Exploring

Where is the famous New York Cavern located?

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Howe Caverns is West of Schenectady on Interstate 88.
Asked in Home & Garden, Water Fountains and Ponds, Cave Exploring

How does ponds get in caves?

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Through ground water that has seeped through the ground and rain water that has traveled through the cave by streams.
Asked in Cave Exploring

Who is patron saint of spelunking?

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Saint Benedict because he lived in a cave as a hermit.
Asked in Cave Exploring

Where is krubera-voronja?

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The cave Crubera - Voronja is in Georgia, Abhazia , in Caucasus monuntains, Arabica's region.
Asked in Cave Exploring

What is spelunking?

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Spelunking is the exploration of caves for recreational purposes or just for fun. Spelunkers do not collect scientific data. Spelunkers are not trained in advanced cave exploration techniques. People who enter caves with the bare minimum of equipment are said to be spelunking. Spelunkers do not venture to depths beyond 300 meters, or lengths beyond 2 kilometers. Once a spelunker gains some experience and training, he is a "caver." And once a caver begins contributing to the cave science community by publishing articles, he is said to be a "speleologist."
Asked in Cave Exploring

Who discovered the titan cave?

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Dave Nixon discovered Titan, but Titan is not a cave, it is a pitch (a vertical section of cave) in the Peak Cavern/Speedwell System.
Asked in Explorers and Expeditions, Cave Exploring, Survival Tips

What do you need to explore a cave?

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You would need a first aid kit, water, emergancy water, at LEAST two days worth of food, rope harness and flare gun(if you need to use the flare gun be smart dont fire it straight up if there is no opening) I am intrigued. I don't know where you (first to reply) go caving but the list you give may be of value on the surface if the caves are in very remote country. If so then you need to plan for the surface-camp, walking etc as well as the caving, but that's a separate matter. That list's not much use for most caving trips. You may want a flare gun in remote countryside - but never underground, where it would be dangerous and useless, even with an open shaft entrance. Sticking to the underground needs and assuming a normal caving trip of <12 hours duration without camping in the cave... FIRST: a proper helmet and lamp designed for caving; as caves be dark, very dark and often contain low roofs or places with a stone-fall risk. 2: Proper footwear. Very often now, rubber Wellington boots though you could use industrial safety-boots. They won't last as long and are heavy. The main points are good support and good grip on wet, often muddy, rock. 3 : Decent lamp & helmet... a good idea to carry a compact spare & spare batteries in water-tight container. Some cavers attach a small torch to the side of the helmet as an emergency light. 4: Appropriate clothing for the cave, from a wetsuit if you're going to be in deep water a lot, to light clothing with perhaps a boiler-suit if the cave is dry & warm. Most cavers now use a one-piece fleece-fabric undersuit with a waterproof PVC one-piece oversuit, for most trips. 5: "Rope harness"... Hmmm, yes if the cave contains pitches. It may do if you are its explorers so will not know what it holds, but if you are, you would not be asking questions here about how to go caving! You'll find the ropes, descender, ascenders, etc to suit the cave and your own style of rigging and rope techniques; will come in useful too. (There are marked differences between European & US single-rope techniques.) Or of course, ladders and lifelines etc. 6: Food. Yes, sufficient to sustain you during the trip. E.g., Chocolate bars, boiled sweets, oatmeal bars. Water: very possibly, for long trips in very dry caves. 7: First-aid kit. A survival-bag and a few rolled bandages plus a pair of safety-scissors, all in waterprood wrappings, are the only items likely to be much use to you. Anything further is in the rescue-organisation's kit. 8: Still on underground kit only. Possibly a folded, laminated copy of the cave's survey / description if it is a complex system presenting route-finding problems. If not available, small cairns of pebbles or sand at junctions, and removed on exit, are permissable assuming they won't confuse or be demolished by other parties visiting the cave at the same time. Marking the walls is obviously wrong. 9: Decent lamp, mounted on a proper caving-helmet; mentioned again so you don't forget. Funny how the original reply omits this most obvious kit! 10: Membership of a proper caving-club so you can learn all this lot and enjoy your caving to the full. Finally... daunted by that lot? Take up another hobby!
Asked in Cave Exploring

What are the spikes in caves called?

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Stalactites and Stalagmites