Gum Disease

Gum diseases are infections of the bone and tissues supporting the teeth. Untreated gum diseases can become severe and may lead to tooth loss. These diseases include periodontitis and gingivitis.

Asked in Gum Disease, Oral Health and Dental Care

What causes teeth grinding while sleeping?

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There isn't a single answer to this question as it could be a list of things, such as stress, nightmares, or even mental disorders such as PTSD can be the cause of such. Caffeine intake is also known to be a factor that can cause you to grind your teeth. Try to avoid caffeine before bed, and minimize intake during the day. The most common reason is your stress level. People tend to clench their teeth at night when a stressful situation bothers them. Without realizing it, you will just bite so hard that your muscles are hurt. Then when you are asleep, your jaws are moving so hard that the chewing surfaces are damaged. Other reasons for teeth grinding while you are sleeping include: New medication or a change in medication Abnormal bite or crooked or missing teeth
Asked in Oral Health and Dental Care, Gum Disease

What is true pocket?

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A true pocket is formed when, due to gum disease (periodontitis), the periodontal ligament (that attaches the tooth's root to the surrounding gum) is destroyed. This causes a gap or pocket that runs down the sides of the tooth. Eventually the bacteria that caused the periodontal disease will be introduced to the underlying Alveolar Bone and will destroy that also, causing the tooth to become mobile and ultimately it will fall out. Gum disease can be halted, (the prognosis is better if caught earlier) by a routine of careful cleaning, visits to the dentist for ultrasonic periodontal cleaning, and use of anti-bacterial mouthwashes. Signs of gum disease are: red angry swollen gums, bleeding gums on brushing, bad breath and build-up of tartar. Remember life is more enjoyable with healthy teeth and gums.
Asked in Conditions and Diseases, Oral Health and Dental Care, Gum Disease

How do you cure gum disease?

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Curing Gum Disease: There are many different reasons for gum disease or Periodontal disease and sometimes called "Pyoria". 1) Improper or inadequate home care. 2) Not seeing the dentist or dental hygienist on a regular basis. 3) Genetic disposition. This does not mean that if your parents lost their teeth, you will lose your teeth. This just means you need to be aware that you are a possible candidate for periodontal disease. 4) Occlusive trauma. This means that you bite may be off or you are grinding and clenching your teeth. Usually excessive wear on your teeth is a sign that you are doing this. 5) Habits, such as smoking. This is proven to accelerate the periodontal disease. Most periodontal disease activity if caught early is very easily treated. It may require a deep periodontal cleaning and periodontal surgery. Look in the yellow pages for a PERIODONTIST, who is a gum specialist. Here is more input from others: Brush your teeth, floss them, and rinse with Listerine, also be sure to stimulate them regularly like you are brushing your gums. be gentle! Supplement with a good multivitamin/multimineral, COQ10, and Peri-gum. Ideally amalgam fillings other metal, cavitations, and root canals should be cleaned up. New answer; Brushing and flossing alone cannot completely remove all of the plaque and biofilm from a person with gum disease. If it could, most gingivitis would be non-existent. Plaque biofilm is full of anaerobic bacteria (living without oxygen) that are deposited on your teeth and in the concave root surfaces under your gums. Your brush and floss can't physically reach all of these areas to completely remove these bacteria. However, with an irrigator, you can easily deliver a stream of water to flush the bacteria and loose particles out of these hard-to-reach areas. --------------------- Managing gum disease is all about daily plaque control - essentially sound oral hygiene. That means, in most cases, stopping the plaque in your mouth is really in your own hands. Brush every day. Floss every day. Period. Your dentist or oral hygienist may recommend fluoride toothpaste or tartar reduction rinses. Colgate Total is approved by the FDA for helping to prevent advanced gum disease by reducing plaque and tartar. Dental professionals recommend oral irrigation as a great way to really clean teeth and gums. Oral irrigators get what your toothbrush and floss, don't, so plaque and tartar and the resulting advanced gum disease never come back. Oral irrigators flood the mouth with a jet of water under pressure to flush offending food particles and bacteria from the mouth. And most importantly, from under the gum line where the infection is. It is just like a wound on your arm - you must keep it clean for it to heal. There are many types of irrigators. Fairly new on the market are irrigators that attach to your shower head or your sink faucet such as Waterpik or OralBreeze. A search on Amazon will produce 99% of available products. All types have pros and cons. ================================================================================== New Answer Introduction: Gum disease mainly affects the soft tissue and bone that support the teeth. It is also known as periodontal disease. This type of disease commonly indicates the swollen condition of the gums. Symptoms: Swollen in gums. Puffed gums. Loose teeth. Bleeding gums. To feel pain during chewing. Pus between teeth and gum. Causes: Poor oral hygiene is the common reason for all gum related disease. Always try to brush your teeth at regular interval or else it can cause plaque formation on your teeth. It is a mass of bacteria that easily grows on mouth surface. When you consume starchy food or sweet beverages, bacteria starts to convert carbohydrate into energy and acid at the same time. Formed acid starts to break down your gums and tooth strength. Treatment: Improve your good oral habits such as brushing habits, use toothpaste that contain the right amount of natural mineral, flossing your teeth at regular basis, try to quit smoking, visit your dentist on a regular basis. Mouthwash is the best natural way to kill mouth bacterial, because it contains hydrogen peroxide and chlorhexidine. You can also use a deep cleaning method such as scaling and root planning. Scaling is mainly used to remove tartar and root planning is used to remove rough spots from teeth. Sometimes, this procedure may result in bleeding, light swelling, etc.
Asked in Food & Cooking, Gum Disease

What can you eat with Gum Infection?

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u can eat curd rice with some soft bannana
Asked in Oral Health and Dental Care, Gum Disease, Dentists

What medication would you use to tighten pockets in gums?

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Managing gum disease is all about daily plaque control - essentially sound oral hygiene. That means, in most cases, stopping the plaque in your mouth is really in your own hands. Brush every day. Floss every day. Period. Your dentist or oral hygienist may recommend fluoride toothpaste or tartar reduction rinses. Colgate Total is approved by the FDA for helping to prevent advanced gum disease by reducing plaque and tartar. * Dental professionals recommend oral irrigation as a great way to really clean teeth and gums. Oral irrigators get what toothbrushes and floss don't, so plaque and tartar and the resulting advanced gum disease never come back. Oral irrigators flood the mouth with a jet of water under pressure to flush offending food particles and bacteria from the mouth. From under the gum line where the infection is. It is just like a wound on your arm - you must keep it clean for it to heal. And now there's fresh evidence that advanced gum disease responds well to oral irrigators. Fairly new on the market are irrigators that attach to your shower head or your sink faucet such as Waterpik or Oral Breeze. Do not use any mouthwash that has alcohol as an ingredient. New Answer; * Antiseptic "chip" Antibiotic gel Antibiotic micro-spheres The medication is called Chlorhexidine. * You can find something called "Sterisol" containing Chlorhexedrine in the bottom shelves of Shopper' Drugmart or Walgreens (no, I don`t work for them). Mind you, it really only works in combination with flossing. The same red fluid is called "Hexoral" in some European countries. In the US, this is a prescription item. * Use of any medication alone will likely be insufficient to effectively treat periodontal (gum) disease. * Effective treatment of periodontal disease is a 3-step process: 1. Correct evaluation and diagnosis by a dental professional, along with initial therapy which may include deep scaling of the root surfaces of the teeth to remove accretions, placement of local antimicrobial therapeutics, prescribing oral medications such as antibiotics or anti-collagenase meds (Periostat), and possibly surgery. 2. Effective and frequent oral hygiene procedures (brushing, flossing, rinsing, etc.) 3. Regular and frequent monitoring and maintenance procedures by your dental professional. * There is no cure for gum disease. However, if diagnosed early, it can be effectively treated and controlled. Talk to your dental professional about the best options for you. * Peroxide, baking soda, tetracycline. But need to consult your dentist before.
Asked in Oral Health and Dental Care, Gum Disease

What does gum disease feel like?

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The main symptoms of gingivitis are dark red swollen gums that are mushy and bleed easily. Pain is usually minimal. People with periodontitis have the same symptoms. In addition they may also have pain, loose teeth, and bad breath.
Asked in Conditions and Diseases, Oral Health and Dental Care, Gum Disease

How can you ease the pain of gum disease?

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The best way to rid yourself of the pain is to get rid of the gum disease. Clean the gum line with a nice soft brush and floss, and massage the gums to increase blood flow. Tf the disease is too far advanced you may need treatment by a periodontist; this is a dentist who specializes in gum disease. Gum disease is progressive and without treatment can lead to bone loss and loose teeth. A temporary pain relief measure is to use cloves, not cloves of Garlic, but the kind that are found in the spice section of the supermarket. Hold in the mouth and gently suck one or two for 10 minutes. Spit out and gently rinse the mouth with warm water. Managing gum disease is all about daily plaque control - essentially sound oral hygiene. Brush and floss every day. Your dentist or oral hygienist may recommend fluoride toothpaste or tartar reduction rinses. Colgate Total is approved by the FDA for helping to prevent advanced gum disease by reducing plaque and tartar.
Asked in Conditions and Diseases, Wasps and Hornets, Gum Disease, Cell Biology (cytology)

Can you die from gingivitis?

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No. Gingivitis is simply inflammation of the gums. It is the most common oral disease in humans, affecting small children and adults of all ages. It is generally reversible with good oral hygiene (brushing and flossing) and perhaps a dental cleaning at a dental office.
Asked in Oral Health and Dental Care, Gum Disease, Endocrine System

What are the causes of a lump on the gum that sometimes lets out pus?

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That would be a periapical abscess. The tooth it is associated with is dead, you should have a root canal or extraction a.s.a.p. Waiting too long will allow the recurrent infection to break down the bone supporting the tooth and the long term prognosis of a root canal will be diminished. Having a long standing recurrent infection can also cause numerous other systemic problems and risk blood sepsis if the infection is released into the blood stream. Go to your Dentist, get an X-ray.
Asked in Conditions and Diseases, Oral Health and Dental Care, Gum Disease

How do you get rid of minor gingivitis?

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Answer 1 Get a waterpik. Fill it with a splash of hydrogen peroxide, a splash of mouthwash and fill the rest with warm water. Do this atleast twice per day. You should be fine within a few weeks. Answer 2 Thorough professional cleaning can stabilise the disease, but advanced cases often need surgery. The dentist reshapes the gums so that in daily brushing the patient can reach all areas effectively. But essentially the job of keeping the teeth clean and the gums healthy is a matter of sound dental hygiene at home. This may entail a range of measures, especially thorough brushing, and particularly between the teeth, to remove plaque. Your dentist will advise you about mouthwashes that may help. Also, you can check your efficiency by occasional use of tablets or drops that stain the plaque you haven't removed. This will show you where your brush isn't reaching. Dental floss, toothpicks and rubber tips all help to keep a bacteria a day.
Asked in Health, Conditions and Diseases, Oral Health and Dental Care, Gum Disease

How does smoking cause gum disease?

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Smoking does not 'cause' gum disease per se. However, smoking is considered a significant risk factor for gum disease. A risk factor is something that may make a person more susceptible to a disease. There are several recognized risk factors for gum disease. Poor oral hygiene, diabetes, genetics, and age, along with smoking are all considered common risk factors for gum disease (periodontitis). Gum disease is an infection caused by bacteria that colonize in the space (pocket or sulcus) between the teeth and gums. The body reacts to these bacteria with an immune response in which the tissue, including gum tissue, connective tissue, and bone, are slowly destroyed. If enough tissue surrounding the teeth is destroyed, the teeth eventually lose enough supporting structure that they can no longer withstand the forces of biting and chewing. The teeth will become loose and can be lost. Once the teeth have been lost, the infection goes away, because there is no longer a space (sulcus) for the bacteria to colonize. Smoking is a risk factor for gum disease because the the chemicals in inhaled smoke interfere with the body's ability to repair damaged tissues. Smoking cuts down on the blood supply because it is vasoconstrictive . It limits the the flow of oxygen and nutrients to the tissue. It is also known that nicotine is toxic to cells called fibroblasts, which are responsible for manufacturing new connective tissue. The less fibroblasts work, the more rapid the progression of gum disease. The American Association of Periodontists (gum specialists) (www.perio.org) has determined that smoking may be the single most significant risk factor for advanced severe gum disease. In a study published several years ago, over 50% of all Americans who had advanced gum disease were either current or past smokers. While smoking is a significant risk factor, gum disease is a multi-factorial condition. Quiting smoking can go a long way toward minimizing the progression of the disease, but other factors need to be taken into consideration in any effort to control the disease. Your best option is to discuss your particular condition with your dentist and dental hygienist. They are able to assess the situation and make the best recommendations for countering the disease. camron handcock
Asked in Health, Conditions and Diseases, Oral Health and Dental Care, Gum Disease

Can honey help cure gum disease?

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no. it may make it worse. Gum disease is a chronic infection, often under the tooth line. See your dentist.
Asked in Gum Disease

What does flucloxacillin treat?

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Viral Infections (NOT DENTAL USED)
Asked in Health, Conditions and Diseases, Oral Health and Dental Care, Gum Disease

How do you know if i have gum disease?

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There are 7 signs of gum disease 1.Your gums bleed easily 2.Your gums are very red, tender or swollen 3.You can see pus in between your teeth and gums when they are pressed 4.Your gums seem to be pulling away from your teeth 5.You have chronic bad breath or a bad taste in your mouth 6.You notice a change in the way you bite or in the way your teeth fit together 7.Your teeth are loosing or they are separating
Asked in Oral Health and Dental Care, Gum Disease, Black Bears

Is 'black line' a danger to the child or his teeth?

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It isn't harmful to the child or his teeth. It just needs to be cleaned off, by a professional probably. Then you should take extra care to brush the child's teeth a little longer each time you brush them and brush them at least twice a day. Don't brush harder or use a hard bristle brush. Use a soft bristle brush and brush longer. The child should eventually get rid of the bacteria in his mouth that is causing the staining. Try changing a few things in his diet; less sugar, less caffeine, stuff like that. If you talk with his dentist, they will have better suggestions for you also.
Asked in Health, Conditions and Diseases, Oral Health and Dental Care, Gum Disease

What is the relation between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease?

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I BELIEVE THAT I READ SOMEWHERE that if you have an infection in your mouth, from either infected teeth or gums you have to be careful at the dentist. If a dentist starts digging in your mouth to remove an infected tooth or cut infected gums, there is a slight risk that the infection can get stirred up and enter your bloodstream...If that happens, I do believe that the infection can travel to your heart and trigger a heart attack. I believe that this is the main reason a dentist will give you prophylactic (preventive) antibiotic BEFORE he pulls infected teeth and other work on infected gums. If I am wrong, maybe another POSTER can give us a better answer, and we BOTH can learn something!!!.....<<>> ADR0760 is absolutely correct. Diseased gums release high levels of endotoxins into the blood stream which are harmful to other organs in the body. I have included a link on this page, 'Periodontal Disease', which details this problem. The mouth is one of the main entrance way of bacteria into the human body. While many of them are harmless, some bacteria can cause inflammation in many organs, including the heart, the liver, the pancreas, etc. Gum disease is caused by micro-organisms that are harvested in the gums. If the harmful bacteria are not removed and the gum disease cured, it can reach other organs in the body and be fatal. Most of the other responses are basically correct, but I am a stickler for details and so let me just clarify a few things. Most of the time, when a person is required to take prophylactic antibiotics prior to a dental appointment this is because they have an abnormal heart condition, usually a congenital heart defect (present at birth) such as a heart murmur, or a damaged or artificial heart valve. The prophylactic antibiotic is not to prevent against cardiac arrest, it is to prevent against bacterial endocarditis, which is a rare but life threatening infection of the heart (actually the space around the heart I think?). What most patients don't understand (and even some physicians) is that if prophylactic antibiotics are needed, they are needed for EVERY dental procedure, not just extractions. Yes, that includes cleanings. In fact, your dental cleaning probably causes more bleeding than any other procedure except an extraction. Now, there is also a separate link between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease (which could lead to cardiac arrest). This has to do with the chronic infection present in your mouth when you have periodontal disease. You've got this constant infection and so there is constantly a release of chemical markers of inflammation into your system and in your blood stream, one of the key ones being named C-Reactive protein....now I can't remember the exact link but people with perio and people with cardiovascular disease both have very high circulating levels of C-Reactive Protein and for reasons beyond my comprehension this complicates or otherwise aggravates cardiovascular disease. Interestingly enough there are also links between periodontal disease and pre-term low birth weight babies, osteoporosis, respiratory diseases and pancreatic cancer in men over age 50. There is also a VERY strong and well documented link between periodontal disease and diabetes, not only does diabetes make perio worse (which we have known for years and years) but recently we have discovered the uncontrolled perio can also make the diabetes worse and harder to control, so the 2 are linked VERY closely.
Asked in Health, Gum Disease, Warts

What could a lump or bump on the roof of your mouth be?

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It could be a number of things. First if it is hard and bony and has been there for a long time it could be Tori, a bony growth that is not harmful or anything to be worried about (unless you have to get dentures at some point). If it is soft it can be anything from a cyst to a tissue growth. I would suggest having it checked by a dentist to make sure that it isn't anything to worry about.
Asked in Health, Conditions and Diseases, Gum Disease

How can you cure periodontal disease at home?

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I'm going through this on a daily basis so I'm answering this with personal experience. It depends on how advanced your condition has become. In other words, how infected with bacteria your gums have become. See a dental hygienist as soon as you can. If your gums bleed when you brush or floss or your gums bleed easily when gently poked, you most likely have gum disease. It all depends on how advanced your case is, and there are 4 stages from what I have been told. Stage 1 has the best chance of being cured or the bacterial level being able to be reversed, stages 2 thru 4 are incurable. I was told I was between a stage 2 and 3. Your dental hygienist will tell you. Do not gauge for yourself. From what I've been told, once you have gum disease you have it for life. Your mouth is like Disneyland for bacteria. Like most visitors, they'll never stop coming back. Since my case was slightly advanced, they did a scaling/root planing procedure which was where they gave me a local anesthetic and basically scrubbed my gums from the root and up. After that I have to go in every 3 months or so to have what's knows as periodontal maintenance done. What they do is a cleaning of my gums, not the scaling root planing, just a general cleaning. Then my gums get flushed with medication, then irrigated. This keeps the bacteria from infecting my gums further, combined with my own personal home care of flossing and proper brushing. They also check the gum pockets in order to make sure my teeth aren't falling out of the gum line. It sucks, but once you have it there is no turning back. Good Luck! I am a registered dental hygienist, and in addition to all of the wonderful information in the last posting, I'll add this: If your "gum disease" (periodontal disease) is early and has not yet invaded the jaw bone, then there is still a chance that it could be reversed. however, once the bone around your teeth becomes infected and starts to break down, it is incurable. At that point, the best we can do is to stop or slow the progression and maintain what is left. If you have been told that you have any 5mm pockets or deeper, then you are probably in the incurable phase. 4mm pockets are borderline. Obviously, as a dental hygienist I am going to recommend that you see your dentist or hygienist about this, professional intervention is truly your best bet. However, if you want to help the condition or try and somehow positively impact your situation from home there are a few things I would recommend: #1 If you smoke, QUIT SMOKING!!! Most advanced cases of perio are also smokers. It is the #1 link to periodontal disease #2 if you have diabetes, do your best to keep your blood sugar well controlled. Take your medications as directed. Control your diet as recommended. Uncontrolled or poorly controlled Diabetes is the #2 link to perio. #3 Buy a Sonicare or Oral-B Sonic Complete electric Toothbrush. Any of the higher end models that cost around $100 and say the word "sonic" in them will be beneficial. You will get superior plaque removal results, and it is the bacterial plaque that causes perio. Use this at least 2x a day for 2 mins. (there is a built in 2 min timer, isn't that nice?) #4 Floss.....yes I know, the "F" word. But you NEED to floss, at least once a day. Sorry, you just have to. #5 If you absolutely won't floss regularly then you need to do SOMETHING every day to clean in between your teeth such as stimudents, a tooth pick, a prox-a-brush or a water-pik. But, I promise...NONE of these are as good, or as cheap as regular old floss. #6 Consider antiseptic mouthrinses. Now, I personally don't use a daily mouthrinse because I haven't seen enough clinical evidence that it is beneficial, however, I don't think it could hurt. Listerine would be an example, Crest Pro-Health rinse is another example (but watch out, it stains some people's teeth) or even a simple hydrogen peroxide rinse which can be mixed at home. If you are a smoker I would not recommend the hydrogen peroxide rinse, however, because there is some evidence that suggests that particular combination might increase your risk for oral cancer. There are many many more factors that go into the prevention, treatment and maintenance of periodontal disease, but that ought to be enough to keep you busy for a while. Managing gum disease is all about daily plaque control - essentially sound oral hygiene. That means, in most cases, stopping the plaque in your mouth is really in your own hands. Brush every day. Floss every day. Period. Your dentist or oral hygienist may recommend fluoride toothpaste or tartar reduction rinses. Colgate Total is approved by the FDA for helping to prevent advanced gum disease by reducing plaque and tartar. Dental professionals recommend oral irrigation as a great way to really clean teeth and gums. Oral irrigators get what tooth brushes and floss don't, so plaque and tartar and the resulting advanced gum disease never come back. Oral irrigators flood the mouth with a jet of water under pressure to flush offending food particles and bacteria from the mouth. From under the gum line where the infection is. It is just like a wound on your arm - you must keep it clean for it to heal. And now there's fresh evidence that advanced gum disease responds well to oral irrigators. Do not use any mouthwash that has alcohol as an ingredient. The alcohol kills the good bacteria as well as the bad. There is a new gum disease treatment on the market. It dissolves tartar above and below the gum line; which prevents destructive anaerobic bacteria from mounting attacks on your gums. Otherwise, it does not harm good bacteria.
Asked in Dental Insurance and Financing Dental Care, Gum Disease, Dentists

Where to find free low income dental services in Mahoning County Ohio?

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We found great dental and healthcare in Youngstown at the Community Health Center. They base your cost on your income. The phone number is 330-744-9557. Very nice people working there and great doctors and dentists. Hope this helps, Good Luck !
Asked in Oral Health and Dental Care, Gum Disease, Drinking Water

When was fluoride first added to drinking water?

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In the U.S. - 1945. However, a lot of cities have naturally fluoridated water. In the U.S., there are a lot of news articles about adding fluoride to water. But for the rest of the world, too much fluoride in the water is a concern and there are lots of programs to remove it down to safe levels.
Asked in Conditions and Diseases, Oral Health and Dental Care, Gum Disease

Is gingivitis curable?

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Gingivitis, a gum condition, is very common and studies have revealed that every adult will suffer from gingivitis at least for a time. Some estimation has disclosed that at least 80% of the population is suffering from the symptoms of gingivitis at this very moment! Even if we don't bother about the exact figure of people suffering from this gum disease, it can't be ruled out that gingivitis for many of us is a chronic problem. How does gingivitis occur? - This is the bottom line question. Bacteria in our mouth cause this gum condition. Bacteria feed on plaque. Plaque accumulates on your teeth and remains soft at first. With time it gets hardened and calcifies on the teeth. This plaque and microscopic food particles and bacteria come altogether in the gum line, which gives birth to irritation and ultimately gingivitis. Though gingivitis is said to be the inflammation, it can be the cause of several levels of severity. The initial levels are: Gum sensitivity- in this case, you will realize that at the time of eating some food or at the time of brushing, your gums hurt a bit. Later levels' most common symptoms along with the initial level's symptoms are: Bleeding gums- the bleeding of gums varies from individual to individual but the common thing is the gums will always pain at the time brushing. Severe pain- here, the gums will pain even if you are not brushing your teeth. The appearance of the gums: the gums will appear as inflamed or swollen in the portions where gingivitis is prevalent. The gum may also look as if the tissue is torn and appear as a wound on the surface. The feel: when you touch your gums, they will seem to be soft instead of firm and hard. Receding gums: this is the last symptom, which is the most severe. If you block the continuation of gingivitis, the gums will eventually recede away from the teeth, which will cause loosening of tooth and finally its loss! But don't panic, there is treatment for gingivitis and your teeth can be treated from it extensively. The inflammation of gums is the effect of plaque that gets accumulated on your teeth. So the way to cure your gums is to remove the cause of your gum's disease. Good dental hygiene is the best way possible to remove this gum disease. Regularly brush your teeth and floss between every tooth. These may keep the plaque accumulation under check. At the initial stages of gingivitis, take proper dental care and mouthwash to clean your mouth. If your gums aren't swollen, gently brush them, which will stimulate the gum tissue-removing bacteria.
Asked in Gum Disease, Root Canals, Orthodontists

What dental implants can do?

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Dental implants serve as anchors for artificial teeth. If you have a tooth extracted and need to have the space filled with a tooth, a dental implant will do the job. After the dental implant is placed in bone and fully integrated, a crown can be fabricated which will give the appearance and function of a natural tooth.