Harlem Renaissance

Originally called "The New Negro Movement", it was a period during the 1920s and 1930s when African American culture, including art and literature, made great strides intellectually.

3,523 Questions
Poetry
Harlem Renaissance
Langston Hughes

When did Langston Hughes write Merry-Go-Round?

1914

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History of Italy
Renaissance
Harlem Renaissance

What sources inspired renaissance artists and scholars?

Just to let y'all know, this answer is correct because I got it out of my social studies book. The sources that inspired the Renaissance artists and scholars was human life, and they used perspective. Perspective is a way of showing the depth and distance on a flat surface. I hope this was resourceful!:)

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Harlem Renaissance

What brought about the Harlem Renaissance?

According to the book ''The Harlem Renaissance'' by William H. Johnson, "The main factors contributing to the development of the Harlem Renaissance were African-American urban migration, trends toward experimentation throughout the country and the rise of radical African-American intellectuals."

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Harlem Renaissance
Numbers

What do you call 1 followed by 100 zeros?

The number 1 followed by 100 zeros is called a googol. The number in scientific notation is written 1 x 10100. A googolplex is the number 1 followed by a googol zeros, 1010100.

Also on a side note this word is where the company "Google" gets its name. The inventors of the name originally spelled it like this, but then changed it to Google.

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Harlem Renaissance

Who was called the father of the Harlem Renaissance?

Alain Locke

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Harlem Renaissance
Picture and Image Searches
Alcatraz

Are There Any Photos Of Harlem Gangster Ellsworth Bumpy Johnson?

If you do an Internet search for his name, some photos will appear.

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Harlem Renaissance
Langston Hughes

Was Langston hughes father a slave?

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Harlem Renaissance
Book Search
Decade - 1930s

What were some popular African-American books from the 1930s?

The following short list is from the a site that provides a pretty good list of African American writers since 1746:

http://www.accd.edu/sac/english/bailey/aframlit.htm

1931. Schuyler, George, Black No More.

1932. Brown, Sterling A., Southern Road.

*****Fisher, Rudolph, The Conjure Man Dies: A Mystery Tale of Dark Harlem.

1934. Hurston, Zora Neale, Jonah's Gourd Vine.

1936. Bontemps, Arna, Black Thunder.

1938. Wright, Richard, Uncle Tom's Children.

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Langston Hughes
Poetry
Harlem Renaissance

What is the theme of Dream Deferred by Langston Hughes?

The Theme simply has to postpone one's deepest dreams and desires can lead to destruction of ones self.

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Renaissance
Harlem Renaissance

What values did renaissance humanists and artists agree?

The both valued the naturalness of the word and celebrate beauty of the human body. For example, Renaissance paintings show a S-shape stand because it portrait a more realistic representation of the human form.

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African-American History
Harlem Renaissance

What was one result of the Harlem Renaissance for African-Americans?

instill in many blacks a greater sense of racial pride.

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Harlem Renaissance

Why did african-americans in the Harlem Renaissance move to the north?

To get better jobs and to get away from segregation.

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English Language
Literary Terminology
Renaissance
Harlem Renaissance

What is renaissance?

Renaissance generally means "a rebirth" or "a revival"

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Renaissance
Harlem Renaissance

One renaissance writer and one of his works?

Shakespeare and any one of his many plays. How about Romeo and Juliet.

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New York
Martin Luther King, Jr.
Harlem Renaissance

What is the history of Harlem NY?

The first European settlement in what is now Harlem was by Dutch settlers and was formalized in 1658 as Nieuw Haarlem (or New Haarlem), after the Dutch city of Haarlem. The Indian trail to Harlem's lush bottomland meadows was rebuilt by the Dutch West India Company's black slaves and eventually developed into the Boston Post Road. In 1664, the English took control of the New Netherland colony and anglicized the name of the town to Harlem. On September 16, 1776, the Battle of Harlem Heights (also called the Battle of Harlem or Battle of Harlem Plain) was fought in western Harlem around the Hollow Way (now West 125th St.), with conflicts on Morningside Heights to the south and Harlem Heights to the north. Harlem was "a synonym for elegant living through a good part of the nineteenth century." In the early years of that century, Harlem remained a place of farms, such as James Roosevelt's, east of Fifth Avenue between 110th and 125th Streets. As late as 1820, the community had only 91 families, one church, one school, and one library. Wealthy farmers, called "patroons," maintained country estates largely on the heights overlooking the Hudson River. Service connecting the suburb of Harlem with New York was by steamboat on the East River, an hour and a half's passage, sometimes interrupted when the river froze in winter, or else by stagecoach along the Boston Post Road, which descended from McGown's Pass (now in Central Park) and skirted the saltmarshes around 110th Street, to pass through Harlem. An 1811 New York City planning commission opined that Harlem would not be developed for over a hundred years.[2] The New York and Harlem Railroad (now Metro North) was incorporated in 1831, to better link the city with the suburb, starting at a depot at East 23rd Street. It was extended 127 miles north to a railroad junction in Columbia County at Chatham, New York by 1851. In the years between about 1850 and 1870, the village of Harlem declined. Many large estates, including the Hamilton Grange of Alexander Hamilton, were auctioned off as the soil was depleted and crop yields fell. The land became occupied by Irish squatters, whose presence further depressed property values. The impoverished village was taken over by the city of New York in 1873. Recovery came when elevated railroads were extended to Harlem in 1880. With the construction of the els, urbanized development occurred very rapidly, with townhouses, apartments, and tenements springing up practically overnight. Developers anticipated that the planned Lexington Avenue subway would ease transportation to lower Manhattan, and feared that new housing regulations would be enacted in 1901, so they rushed to complete as many new buildings as possible before these came into force. Early entrepreneurs had grandiose schemes for Harlem: Polo was actually played at the original Polo Grounds (later to become home of the New York Giants baseball team) and Oscar Hammerstein I opened the Harlem Opera House on East 125th Street in 1889. In 1893, Harlem Monthly Magazine wrote that "it is evident to the most superficial observer that the centre of fashion, wealth, culture, and intelligence, must, in the near future, be found in the ancient and honorable village of Harlem." However, the construction glut and a delay in the building of the subway led to a fall in real estate prices which attracted Eastern European Jews to Harlem in large numbers, reaching a peak of 150,000 in 1917. Presaging their later response to the arrival of black Harlemites, existing landowners tried to stops Jews from moving into the neighborhood. At least one rental sign declared "Keine Juden und Keine Hunde" ("No Jews and no dogs."). They needn't have bothered; Jewish Harlem was an ephemeral entity, and by 1930, only 5,000 Jews remained. The area now known as Spanish Harlem became occupied by Italians. Italian Harlem is now gone as well, though traces lasted into the 1970s, in the area around Pleasant Avenue. In the early 20th century, Harlem was also home to a significant Irish population, and a large group of Finns. The arrival of blacks Small groups of black people lived in Harlem as early as 1880, especially in the area around 125th Street and "Negro tenements" on West 130th Street. The mass migration of blacks into the area began in 1904, thanks to another real estate crash, the worsening of conditions for blacks elsewhere in the city, and the leadership of a black real estate entrepreneur named Philip Payton, Jr. Harlem experienced another real estate bust in 1904-1905; after the collapse of the 1890s, new speculation and construction started up again in 1903 and the resulting glut of housing led to a crash in values that eclipsed the late-19th century slowdown. Landlords could not find white renters for their properties, so Philip Payton stepped in to bring blacks. His company, the Afro-American Realty Company, was almost single-handedly responsible for migration of blacks from their previous neighborhoods, the Tenderloin, San Juan Hill (now the site of Lincoln Center), and Hell's Kitchen in the west 40s and 50s. The move to northern Manhattan was driven in part by fears that anti-black riots such as those that had occurred in the Tenderloin in 1900[8] and in San Juan Hill in 1905[2] might recur. In addition, a number of tenements that had been occupied by blacks in the west 30s were destroyed at this time to make way for the construction of the new Penn Station. In 1907, black churches began to move uptown. St. Philip's Episcopal Church, for one, purchased a block of buildings on West 135th Street to rent to members of its congregation. During World War I, black laborers were actively recruited to leave the southern United States and work in northern factories, thinly staffed because of the war. So many came that it "threaten[ed] the very existence of some of the leading industries of Georgia, Florida, Tennessee and Alabama." Many came to Harlem. By 1920, central Harlem was predominantly black and by 1930, blacks lived as far south as Central Park, at 110th Street. The expansion was fueled primarily by an influx of blacks from the West Indies and the southern U.S. states, especially Virginia, South and North Carolina, and Georgia. As blacks moved in, white residents left; between 1920 and 1930, 118,792 white people left the neighborhood and 87,417 blacks arrived. Between 1907 and 1915, some white residents of Harlem resisted the neighborhood's change, especially once the swelling black population pressed west of Lenox Avenue, which served as an informal color line until the early 1920s.[5] Some made pacts not to sell to or rent to blacks. Others tried to buy property and evict black tenants, but the Afro-American Realty Company retaliated by buying other property and evicting whites. They also attempted to convince banks to deny mortgages to black buyers, but soon gave up. Central Harlem was essentially entirely a black community by 1920. Ghettofication Employment among black New Yorkers fell as some traditionally black businesses, including domestic service and some types of manual labor, were taken over by other ethnic groups, or the industries in question left New York City altogether. The entertainment industry was a major employer in Harlem but relied on income from wealthier whites, whose numbers dropped significantly after Harlemites rioted in 1935, and who stopped coming to Harlem almost altogether after a second round of riots in 1943. There was little investment in private homes or businesses in the neighborhood between 1911 and the 1990s. However, the unwillingness of landlords elsewhere in the city to rent to black tenants, together with a significant increase in the black population of New York, meant that rents in Harlem were for many years higher than rents elsewhere in the city, even as the housing stock decayed. In 1920, one-room apartments in central Harlem rented for $40 to whites or $100-$125 to blacks.In the late 1920s, a typical white working class family in New York paid $6.67 per month per room, while blacks in Harlem paid $9.50 for the same space. The worse the accommodations and more desperate the renter, the higher the rents would be.This pattern would persist through the 1960s; in 1965, CERGE reported that a one room apartment in Harlem rented for $50-$74, while comparable apartments rented for $30-$49 in white slums. The high rents encouraged some property speculators to engage in block busting, a practice whereby they would acquire a single property on a block and sell or rent it to blacks with great publicity. Other landowners would panic, and the speculators would then buy additional houses relatively cheaply. These houses could then be rented profitably to blacks. The high cost of space forced people to live in close quarters, and the population density of Harlem in these years was stunning

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New York City
African-American History
Harlem Renaissance

When did the Harlem Renaissance occur?

The Harlem Renaissance took place from the 1920s to the early 1930s.

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Basketball
Basketball History
Harlem Renaissance

Was Ernest Wagner a Harlem Globetrotter?

Yes.

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Harlem Renaissance

Humanism was an intellectual movement that emphasized?

The paintings of great Renaissance artist

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Renaissance
Harlem Renaissance
US Coins

Why is the Renaissance man concept still valued today?

The concept of the renaissance man is that he is an expert in all Field of technology and science.

This person was seen as a great business man or scientist.

Or generally just a great intellect.

It has not been possible for several hundred years to achieve this in-depth knowledge of so many diverse Field's.

The value of the concept is that a person with in depth knowledge of diverse fields is very useful in business, government and science above the basic qualifications he has due to the insight he can bring that will help the people working in these Field's.

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Renaissance
Middle Ages
Harlem Renaissance

What was the age after the middle age the after age or the Renaissance age?

The Renaissance Age was th age after the Middle ages.

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Renaissance
Harlem Renaissance

What was the most significant consequence of renaissance warfare?

Development of diplomacy as an alternative to war

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African-American History
Mark Twain
Harlem Renaissance

What was a major obstacle in Langston Hughes' life?

He overcame discrimination throughout his life, since he was black. His parents also divorced when he was young, so he he had a rough time.

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Harlem Renaissance

What Inspired WEB Dubois?

WEB Dubois was inspired by his anger at the racism towards the African American race.

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Harlem Renaissance

Who led the Harlem Renaissance movement?

Langston Hughes

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Medical Insurance
Harlem Renaissance
Ibuprofen

Can you lower your deductible prior to a surgery if you haven't yet seen a doctor for the condition?

You can apply to any company any time for changes! The question is - will you be approved? It's NOT relevant whether you see the surgeon first or not. You have symptoms that you know are a problem. Read over the application carefully... most companies even have a "catch all" question that asks if there are any problems they didn't ask about. They also often ask if there is any future treatment recommended.

What is your condition?

For more details see http://www.steveshorr.com/technical_questions.htm#What%20is%20a%20Pre-Existing%20Condition

I've already got coverage and I don't want to switch companies. Just wondering about lowering the deductible.

The questionairre I filled out and the phone interview asked the questions that you mentioned. As I said, I disclosed the condition (perianal fistula) and was granted coverage without any exemption on this condition. I wasn't actually suffering from the condition at the time of application. Have not had a problem with it since 1999 in fact. Have had this coverage since 2003. Surgery was recommended if there were future flare- ups, but it wasn't known if there would be flare-ups or not, as a matter of fact, this appears to be totally unrelated to the first one (differrent location). I had insurance at the time of the 1st problem, but with a different company. I had no lapse in coverage, I switched directly from one company to the other.

I re-read your reply and finally a light went on. What you're saying is I'll basically have to re-apply to lower the deductible and then disclose the condition I have NOW, even thought it's technically not been diagnosed this time.

Can they consider it pre-existing and not cover it at all (at the current deductible) since I disclosed it on the first application and they didn't exclude it?

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