Nikola Tesla

Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) was an inventor, electrical and mechanical engineer. He was famous for his contribution that led to the birth of commercial electricity. He also developed the principle of Tesla coil in 1891.

1,935 Questions
Scientists
Nikola Tesla

What were Nikola Tesla's last words?

"Let the future tell the truth, and Evaluate each one according to his work and accomplishments. The present is theirs. The future, for which I have really worked, is mine"

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Nikola Tesla

Why did Nikola Tesla leave Thomas Edison?

Edison was working on an direct current motor when Tesla began working for him. He couldn't make it work properly and he offered 50 thoundands dollars if he could fix the machine. That was a easy job for Tesla. Once he finished it, Edison took the offer back stating that it was a joke. Tesla took off inmediatly. The next thing Edison did, he took the patent for the direct current motor.

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What was tesla known for?

For the AD current he invented. But Despite the fact that Tesla worked closely with Westinghouse, he still retained his own laboratory, and was very happy when he was working there. He continued to make new discoveries, one of which was a lamp that fluoresced, and was actually a forerunner of today's fluorescent tubes. These hit the market some fifty years after Tesla's prototypes! He also investigated many other phenomena including X-rays and a vacuum tube or valve very similar to the Audion or triode valve pioneered by de Forest in 1907.

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Electrical Engineering
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Nikola Tesla

What is a tap on a Tesla Coil and where should you wire it?

If you are working with a coil, you should have all parts of the coil and knowledge to work with them. In the related links box below, I posted a websited which has all this knowledge and another one about builduing the tesla coil.

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Nikola Tesla

What was Nikola Tesla's IQ?

His IQ was not 500, wiki user. No such IQ. The real IQ was 160-310

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Thomas Edison
Nikola Tesla

Was Nikolai Tesla Better than Thomas Edison?

Thomas Edison was actually jealous of Nikolai Tesla because Tesla was smarter

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Physics
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Nikola Tesla
Gravity

How does Nikola Tesla's anti-gravity machine work?

The reality.

The "Dynamic Theory of Gravity" was one of two Teslas's discoveries, which he worked out in all details in the years 1893 and 1894.

More complete statements concerning these discoveries can only be gleaned from scattered and sparse sources, because the papers of Tesla are concealed in government vaults for national security reasons. These papers are located at the "National Security Research Center" now the "Robert J. Oppenheimer Research Center". These discoveries are denied access because they were classified, even though plans for the hydrogen bomb are on an open shelf and could be seen and copied.

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Poptropica
Nikola Tesla

Which case is Nikola Tesla's on mystery train island?

Tesla's case should be in the baggage car. It has coal stains on it.

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Nikola Tesla

Why did Tesla's alternating current system become the standard for providing electricity?

In the "War of Currents", George Westinghouse and Thomas Edison became adversaries due to Edison's promotion of direct current for electric power distribution over alternating current advocated by Westinghouse and Nikola Tesla.

AC was and it is the best system.

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Nikola Tesla

When did Nikola Tesla invent AC?

Tesla invented the alternating-current generator that provides your light and electricity, the transformer through which it is sent, and even the high voltage coil of your picture tube. The Tesla Coil, in fact, is used in radios, television sets, and a wide range of other electronic equipment - invented in 1891, no-one's ever come up with anything better.

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Aspergers Syndrome
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Nikola Tesla

Did inventor Nikola Tesla have Asperger's Syndrome?

A:It is a possibility.

Nikola Tesla was an inventor and engineer who was viewed as eccentric. Some of his characteristics that could be associated with Asperger's Syndrome (AS) are a possible photographic memory, picture thinking his inventions in every detail without drawing them, fastidiousness about hygeine, not finishing college, and being reclusive. Of course, these characteristics do not mean that he had AS. Less similar to people with AS, he also had friends and made a good impression on most people when he chose to interact with them.

Tesla also had characteristics of synesthesia and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

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Galileo
Nikola Tesla

Where did Galileo Galilei attend school?

In 1574, at the age of 10, Galileo's family sent him to the monastery of Santa Maria di Vallombrosa, near Florence, because his father wanted him to study medicine (a well-paying profession). But Galileo was interested in mathematics. At the age of 17, he entered the University of Pisa to study medicine, as his father wished, but then changed his major from medicine to mathematics and physics.

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Nikola Tesla

When did Nikola Tesla made his discovery?

Tesla invented the alternating-current generator that provides your light and electricity, the transformer through which it is sent, and even the high voltage coil of your picture tube. The Tesla Coil, in fact, is used in radios, television sets, and a wide range of other electronic equipment - invented in 1891, no-one's ever come up with anything better.

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Nikola Tesla

How does Nikola Tesla's work affect us today in society?

The inventions of Nikola Tesla are significant to mankind. He discovered Radiant Energy in 1889. He also invented AC electricity, Neon Lights, Radio transmission, The Electric motor, Wireless electricity transfer, Remote control, Hydraulics, Lasers, Space weapons, Robotics, and many, many more things.

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Nikola Tesla

Was there any places named or holidays celebrated in Nikola Tesla honor?

Mestrovic made a bronze bust (1952) that is held in the Nikola Tesla Museum in Belgrade and a statue (1955/56) placed at the Ruder Boskovic Institute in Zagreb. This statue was moved to Nikola Tesla Street in Zagreb's city centre on the 150th anniversary of Tesla's birth, with the Ruder Boskovic Institute to receive a duplicate. In 1976, a bronze statue of Tesla was placed at Niagara Falls, New York. A similar statue was also erected in his hometown of Gospic in 1986.

The SI unit tesla (T) for measuring magnetic flux density or magnetic induction (commonly known as the magnetic field ) was named in Tesla¹s honour at the Conférence Générale des Poids et Mesures, Paris in 1960 and The Tesla crater on the far side of the Moon and the minor planet 2244 Tesla are also named after him.

The street sign "Nikola Tesla Corner" was recently placed on the corner of the 40th Street and 6th Avenue in Manhattan. There is a large photo of Tesla in the Statue of Liberty Museum. The Liberty Science Center in Jersey City, New Jersey has a daily science demonstration of the Tesla Coil creating a million volts of electricity before the spectators eyes. Many books were written about Tesla : Prodigal Genius: The Life of Nikola Tesla by John J. O'Neill and Margaret Cheney's book Tesla: Man out of Time has contributed significantly to his fame. A documentary film Nikola Tesla, The Genius Who Lit the World, produced by the Tesla Memorial Society and the Nikola Tesla Museum in Belgrade, The Secret of Nikola Tesla (Orson Welles), BBC Film Masters of the Ionosphere are other tributes to the great genius.

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Nikola Tesla

What did Nikola Tesla invent?

You mean besides the Tesla Coil?

Nikola Tesla invented the Alternating current, hydroelectric power , fluorescent light, laser beam, wireless communications, wireless transmission of electrical energy, remote control, robotics, Tesla's turbines and vertical takeoff aircraft, X-ray tubes of his own design, vacuum tube which emitted light to be used in photography, a bladeless steam turbine based on a spiral flow principle, a pump design to operate at extremely high temperature, basic system of radio, an instrument to receive radio waves the radio, Alternating Current Motors and Transformers.
Tesla is often described as the most important scientist and inventor of the modern age. He is best known for many revolutionary contributions and inventions in the field of electricity and magnetism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Tesla's patents and theoretical work formed the basis of modern alternating current electric power (AC) systems, including the polyphase power distribution systems and the AC motor, with which he helped usher in the Second Industrial Revolution.

After his demonstration of wireless communication (radio) in 1894 and after being the victor in the "War of Currents" ( in the late 1880s, George Westinghouse and Thomas Edison became adversaries due to Edison's promotion of direct current (DC) for electric power distribution over alternating current (AC) advocated by Westinghouse and Nikola Tesla.), he was widely respected as one of the greatest electrical engineers who worked in America. Much of his early work pioneered modern electrical engineering and many of his discoveries were of groundbreaking importance. But due to his eccentric personality and his seemingly unbelievable and sometimes bizarre claims about possible scientific and technological developments, Tesla was ultimately ostracized and regarded as a mad scientist. Never having put much focus on his finances, Tesla died impoverished at the age of 86.

Aside from his work on electromagnetism and electromechanical engineering, Tesla has contributed in varying degrees to the establishment of robotics, remote control, radar and computer science, and to the expansion of ballistics, nuclear physics, and theoretical physics.

Many interpret the 1943 Supreme Court of the United States decision as crediting Tesla as being the inventor of the radio.

Nikola Tesla, at the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, demonstrated a device he constructed known as the "Egg of Columbus." It was used to demonstrate and explain the principles of the rotating magnetic field model and the induction motor. Tesla's Egg of Columbus performed the feat of Columbus with a copper egg in a rotating magnetic field. The egg spins on its major axis, standing on end due to gyroscopic action.

Tesla's device (two-phased induction motor) used a toroidal (doughnut shaped) iron core stator on which four coils were wound. The device was powered by a two-phase alternating current source (such as a variable speed alternator) to create the rotating magnetic field. The device operated on 25 to 300 hertz frequency. The ideal operating frequency was described as being between 35 to 40 hertz. Reproductions of the device are displayed at the Nikola Tesla Museum in Belgrade, the Technical Museum in Zagreb and in the Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum.

julian Trubin
Nikola Tesla (Serbian: Никола Тесла; 10 July 1856 - 7 January 1943) was an inventor, mechanical engineer, and electrical engineer. He was an important contributor to the birth of commercial electricity, and is best known for his many revolutionary developments in the field of electromagnetism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Tesla's patents and theoretical work formed the basis of modern alternating current (AC) electric power systems, including the polyphase system of electrical distribution and the AC motor. This work helped usher in the Second Industrial Revolution.

Born an ethnic Serb in the village of Smiljan (now part of Gospić), in the Croatian Military Frontier[1] of the Austrian Empire (modern-day Croatia). Tesla was a subject of the Austrian Empire by birth and later became an American citizen.[2] Because of his 1894 demonstration of wireless communication through radio and as the eventual victor in the "War of Currents", he was widely respected as one of the greatest electrical engineers who worked in America.[3] He pioneered modern electrical engineering and many of his discoveries were of groundbreaking importance. In the United States during this time, Tesla's fame rivaled that of any other inventor or scientist in history or popular culture.[4] Tesla demonstrated wireless energy transfer to power electronic devices as early as 1893, and aspired to intercontinental wireless transmission of industrial power in his unfinished Wardenclyffe Tower project.

Because of his eccentric personality and his seemingly unbelievable and sometimes bizarre claims about possible scientific and technological developments, Tesla was ultimately ostracized and regarded as a mad scientist by many late in his life.[5] Tesla never put much focus on his finances and died with little funds at the age of 86, alone in the two room hotel suite in which he lived, in New York City.[6]

The International System of Units unit measuring magnetic field B (also referred to as the magnetic flux density and magnetic induction), the tesla, was named in his honor (at the Conférence Générale des Poids et Mesures, Paris, 1960).

In addition to his work on electromagnetism and electromechanical engineering, Tesla contributed in varying degrees to the establishment of robotics, remote control, radar, and computer science, and to the expansion of ballistics, nuclear physics, and theoretical physics.

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Nikola Tesla

What was special about Nikola Tesla?

First off, Nikola Tesla was brilliant. The Croatian-born engineer spoke eight languages, almost single handedly developed technology that harnessed the power of electricity for household use, and invented things like electrical generators, FM radio, remote control, robots, spark plugs, fluorescent lights, and giant machines that shoot enormous, brain-frying lightning bolts. He had an unyielding, steel-trap photographic memory and an insane ability to visualize even the most complex pieces of machinery the guy did advanced calculus and physics equations in his head, memorized entire books at a time, and successfully pulled off scientific experiments that modern-day technology STILL can't replicate. For instance, in 2007 a group of lesser geniuses at MIT got all pumped up out of their minds because they wirelessly transmitted energy a distance seven feet through the air. Nikola Tesla once lit 200 light bulbs from a power source 26 miles away, and he did it in 1899 with a machine he built from spare parts in the middle of the desert. To this day, nobody can really figure out how he pulled that off, because two-thirds of the schematics only existed in the darkest recesses of Tesla's all-powerful brain.

Of course, much like many other eccentric giga-geniuses and diabolical masterminds, Tesla was also completely insane. He was prone to nervous breakdowns, claimed to receive weird visions in the middle of the night, spoke to pigeons, and occasionally thought he was receiving electromagnetic signals from extraterrestrials on Mars. He was also obsessive-compulsive and hated round objects, human hair, jewelry, and anything that wasn't divisible by three. He was also asexual and celibate for his entire life.

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Nikola Tesla

Who was Nikola Tesla?

Nikola TeslaNikola Tesla (Serbian Cyrillic: Никола Тесла) (10 July 1856 - 7 January 1943) was an inventor and a mechanical and electrical engineer. Born in Smiljan, Croatia part of Austro-Hungarian Empire, his father and mother were both Serbian , and later became an American citizen.[2] Tesla is best known for many revolutionary contributions in the field of electricity and magnetism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Tesla's patents and theoretical work formed the basis of modern alternating current electric power (AC) systems, including the polyphase power distribution systems and the AC motor, with which he helped usher in the Second Industrial Revolution. Contemporary biographers of Tesla have regarded him as "The Father of Physics", "The man who invented the twentieth century"[3] and "the patron saint of modern electricity."[4]

After his demonstration of wireless communication (radio) in 1894 and after being the victor in the "War of Currents", he was widely respected as one of the greatest electrical engineers who worked in America.[5] Much of his early work pioneered modern electrical engineering and many of his discoveries were of groundbreaking importance. During this period, in the United States, Tesla's fame rivaled that of any other inventor or scientist in history or popular culture,[6] but due to his eccentric personality, seemingly unbelievable and sometimes bizarre claims about possible scientific and technological developments, Tesla was ultimately ostracized and regarded as a mad scientist.[7][8] Never having put much focus on his finances, Tesla died impoverished at the age of 86.

The SI unit measuring magnetic flux density or magnetic induction (commonly known as the magnetic field B), the tesla, was named in his honour (at the Conférence Générale des Poids et Mesures, Paris, 1960).

Aside from his work on electromagnetism and electromechanical engineering, Tesla has contributed in varying degrees to the establishment of robotics, remote control, radar and computer science, and to the expansion of ballistics, nuclear physics,[9] and theoretical physics. In 1943, the Supreme Court of the United States credited him as being the inventor of the radio.[10] Many of his achievements have been used, with some controversy, to support various pseudosciences, UFO theories, and early New Age occultism.

Tesla is honored in Croatia where he was born, Serbia, as well as in the Czech Republic. In Smiljan, Croatia his birth place was remodeled as "Tesla museum". He was awarded the highest order of the White Lion by Czechoslovakia, as well an honorable doctorate from several universities includin Columbia, Yale etc. Because of this, he is alternately considered a luminary in the field of science and one of the symbols of personified pride for eastern Europe.

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Nikola Tesla

Was there a tesla earthquake machine?

He constructed a simple device consisting of a piston suspended in a cylinder, which bypassed the necessity of a camshaft driven by a rotating power source, such as a gasoline or steam engine. In this way, he hoped to overcome loss of power through friction produced by the old system. This small device also enabled Tesla to try out his experiments in resonance. Every substance has a resonant frequency which is demonstrated by the principle of sympathetic vibration&endash;the most obvious example is the wine glass shattered by an opera singer (or a tape recording for you couch potatoes.) If this frequency is matched and amplified, any material may be literally shaken to pieces.

A vibrating assembly with an adjustable frequency was finally perfected, and by 1897, Tesla was causing trouble with it in and near the neighborhood around his loft laboratory. Reporter A.L. Besnson wrote about this device in late 1911 or early 1912 for the Hearst tabloid The World Today. After fastening the resonator ("no larger than an alarm clock") to a steel bar (or "link") two feet long and two inches thick:

He set the vibrator in "tune" with the link. For a long time nothing happened-&endash;vibrations of machine and link did not seem to coincide, but at last they did and the great steel began to tremble, increased its trembling until it dialated and contracted like a beating heart&endash;and finally broke. Sledge hammers could not have done it; crowbars could not have done it, but a fusillade of taps, no one of which would have harmed a baby, did it. Tesla was pleased.

He put his little vibrator in his coat-pocket and went out to hunt a half-erected steel building. Down in the Wall Street district, he found one&endash;ten stories of steel framework without a brick or a stone laid around it. He clamped the vibrator to one of the beams, and fussed with the adjustment until he got it.

Tesla said finally the structure began to creak and weave and the steel-workers came to the ground panic-stricken, believing that there had been an earthquake. Police were called out. Tesla put the vibrator in his pocket and went away. Ten minutes more and he could have laid the building in the street. And, with the same vibrator he could have dropped the Brooklyn Bridge into the East River in less than an hour.

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GM and GMC
Fuel Pumps
Hyundai Elantra
Nikola Tesla

What controls the coil and injectors for an Elantra 1994?

"ECM" Electronic Control Module (Under front seat or behind dash).

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Scientists
Nikola Tesla

What was Nikola Tesla's field of study?

electromagnetism

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Nikola Tesla

What personality traits helped Nikola Tesla with his inventions?

One of his most important traits was honesty.

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Electronics Engineering
Military Equipment
Nikola Tesla

Can tesla coils generate an emp?

the coil it is used to produce high voltage, low current, high frequency alternating current electricity. A burst of electromagnetic radiation is something the coil will not do.

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Scientists
Nikola Tesla

What year did Nikola Tesla start college?

1879 at the Technical University of Graz, Austria, and the University of Prague.

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